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Full text of "Hardware merchandising July-September 1911"

HARDWARE»METAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Montreal i 701-702 Eastern Townahipa Bank Bide Toronto : 1«*-1*» University Are. Wfaanipcftt 34 Royal Bank Bldg 

New York: 115 Broadway. London, En*. : M Fleet St„ E.C. 



VOL. XXIII. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE : TORONTO, JULY 8, 1911 



NO. 27 




VCUTIiERYs 



|S' 



For Safe by Leading Wholesale Hardware Houses 



Is It Worth Your While 



introducing "Just as Good" 
brands that will not give 

"QUEEN'S HEAD" 

brand satisfaction? 




CANADA 



John Lysaght, Limited 

Maker* 
Bristol, Newport and Montreal 



A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 

Montreal 
Managers Canadian Branch 




No work- 
shop is com- 
plete without a 
TAYLOR -FORBES 
No. 20 Vise. It combines 
all the advantages of Five 

for the price of one and is 
.i great time and labor saver of 
unexcelled quality. 

By the use of its different combinations 
you bave an anvil, a combination anvil and 
vise, a drill press, a saw clam]) and a pipe 
vise— a repair shop in itself. 



COMB/NAT/ON ANVIL 
AND VISE 



All parts are made from selected materials, 
specially tempered. 

The extra parts are easily put on 
and taken off. There are no bolts 
or screws to get lost or be- 
come rusty. 

This combination cannot be 

equalled for quick sales 

and reasonably large 

profits. It needs but 

a display to make 

sales. 

IrVr/fe for 
Prloo 
List 



Taylor- Forbes, Co., Ltd. 

Gue/ph, - Ontario 

REPRESENTED BY:-Taylor-Forb«s Co., Ltd.. 216 Craig St. W. Montreal; H. G. Rogers-53^ 
Dock Street, St. John. NB ; W. A. MacLannan— Vancouver. B.C.: J. B. H. Rickaby -Victoria. B C ; 
Harry F. Monlden — Travellers' Building. Winnipeg. Canadian United Mfrs. Agency, London, Eng. 



A 



II A RDW A RE AND METAL 




Are You Helping Outfit 

The Vacation Grip ? 

There is a tidy bit of business to be had in outfitting the camper, the fisher- 
man, the summer-resorter and the tourist — but it's business you must work up. 

There are so many things a man would take along, if he thought of them! 
It's up to you to bring them to his attention — to feature them in your windows 
and in your 'newspaper advertising. 

First of all, of course, stands the GILLETTE Safety Razor. It's a necessity, 
as well as a luxury, to the man who appreciates real comfort. Wherever morning 
finds him — in lurching cabin or swaying Pullman — on the back porch or beside a 
convenient stump — he can enjoy his three-minute GILLETTE shave with solid 
satisfaction. 

Then there are hunting outfits and fishing tackle — paint, rope and fittings, or 
perhaps gasoline, for his boat — tents, camp stoves and cooking utensils — baseball, 
lacrosse and tennis supplies. 

Try a "Vacation Suggestions" window trim — and don't forget to feature the 
one thing needful for every vacation wanderer or stay-at-home — the GILLETTE 
fety Razor. 

The Gillette Safety Razor Co., of Canada, Limited 

Office and Factory— 63 St. Alexander Street, MONTREAL 

Offices also in New York, Chicago, London, England, and Shanghai, China. 
Factories in Montreal, Boston, Leicester, Berlin and Paris. 



-QiHette 



KNOWN THE 



WORLD OVER 



HAKDWARE AND METAL 



Mr. Hardware Merchant 




If you want quality, 
combined with price, 
you cannot do better 
than to buy 

6. H. & L, Mfg. Go.'s 

line of 

Builders' Hardware 

We especially re- 
commend to you our 
bevelled design sets. 



The Belleville Hardware & Lock Mfg. Co., 

BELLEVILLE, limited ONTARIO 



CHICAGO 
warn are W 




A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

Combining all the valuable features which experience 
has demonstrated to be desirable. 



(£{jtea<5<* Spring 'But JjEompfnj£, 



CHICAGO 




NEW YORK 



Send for Catalovu* M J6 




Are You Ready to Deliver 

LIGHTNING and BLIZZRAD 



There will be a greater demand than ever this season, for we 
are advertising them more extensively to both dealer and 
consumer than ever before in the history of the business. 



Dealers and House - 

holder s have 

learned 

that the Lightning 
and Blizzard Freez- 
ers make the finest 
cream with the least outlay in time, effort and material of 
any Freezer made and will stand good hard use season 
after season. 

Bettor write Your jobber at once. 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 



.1 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



SIGNS OF QUALITY 

ON GOOD 

Washers, Wringers and Churns 

ARROW 




BRAND 



mm.. 




YOU'LL SEE THEM AT THE BUSY STORES 

They're Trade Winners. No other line begins to equal 
them for Quality, Distinctiveness, Finish or Salability. 



THEY MEAN PROFIT TO DEALER AND SATISFACTION TO USER 



Eastern Agents , W. L. Haldimand & 
Son, Montreal, Que. 

Western Agents, H. F. Moulden & Son, 
Winnipeg, Man. 



CUMMER - DOWSWELL, Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 



TOP CORNICE No. 8014 

Height 30 in., Proj. 18 in. 




A Handsome, Bold, 

Neat, Clear-cut 

Cornice, throwing 

deep, rich shadows. 



AS A SPECULATION 



we made up a large quantity of this 
Cornice on our big new model power 
brake, and we made it to sell cheap. 
Let us quote on your requirements. 

GET OUR CATALOGUE C-1 ON CORNICES, SKYLIGHTS, ETC., ETC. 

THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited, GALT, ONT. 

MAKERS OF THE FAMOUS "GALT" SHINGLE. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ELECTRIC SAD IRONS 

For General Household Ironing 

No source of heat is better adapted to ironing than elec- 
tricity and no Sad Iron better equipped to perform this work 
than the 

B & M ELECTRIC SAD IRON 

It banishes the hot, dirty and bothersome stove. It does 
away with smoke and unhealthy gas fumes and it saves count- 
less, tiresome steps and physical and nervous energy. 

The B & M ELECTRIC SAD IRON saves time-laboring, perspiring time 

It permits ironing to be done at any time or in any room of the house. 
It is simply a practical, economical, labor-saving tool. 
It costs only 3 cents an hour at constant use, while on ordinary ironing 
the current is cut off about half the time. 

Every Merchant will find it Profitable to Handle this Iron 

B & M Electric Sad Iron Weight, 7 lbs. for HO volt current ; Full Nickel-Plated 

Solid Cast Iron Bottom with Heavy Asbestos Sheet under Top Plate, keeping the 
Top and Handle Cool ; Black Enamel Hardwood Handle. Has Hole in Back 
End for Heating Curling Iron. Has 6 ft. Flexible, Insulated Cord with Plug for 
attaching to Ordinary Electric Light Socket. Stand sent with Each Iron. 




•H- 



CHARCOAL IRONS 

For Use of Tailors and for Large Family Ironing 

The Sale of these Irons increases with each year. 

These are English Made Goods of Superior Construction and 
Better Finish than those commonly offered. 

SELF HEATING 

Polished Cast Iron Base ; Japanned and Decorated Hinged Top and Chimney ; 
Ornamental Brass Shield; Varnished Hardwood Handle and Latch Knob. 

It Will Pay You to Handle These Goods — Get Our Prices 

LEWIS BROS., Limited, Montreal 

OTTAWA TORONTO VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RIFLES 



S 
A 

Y Model 1899 

"SAVAGE" FEATHERWEIGHT RIFLE 

x\ Made in .30-30 and .303 Calibre 

G 

E 





Model 1910, .401 Calibre 

"WINCHESTER" REPEATING RIFLE 



w 
I 

N 
C 
H 
E 
S 
T 
E 
R 



The Modern Up-To-Date Rifles are the "Winchester" 
and "Savage." They have many good selling points. 
Safe-— Powerful— Accurate-— Simple in Construction. 

Champion Shotguns 



Best Value for 



Made by 

Iver Johnson's 
Wks. 




We Ship Promptly. 



"CHAMPION" SINGLE BARREL 

In Plain and Automatic Ejector. 
Plain— 12, 16, 20 ga., 44. Automatic— 12, 16, 20 ga. 
See Sporting Goods Catalogue for Full Line. 

Write for Prices 



W» Ship Promptly 



* FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, 



WHOLESALE HARDWARE and IRON MERCHANTS Limited 

Montreal, ----- Canada 





HARDWARE AND METAL 




STARRETT 

SAW FOR 
EVERY PUR- 
POSE, EVEN 
SCREW - SLOT 
TING. 

THEY CUT 
QUICKER AND 
LA ST LONGER 
THAN OTHER SAWS. 
ORDER BY NAME AND 
DO NOT ACCEPT SUB- 
STITUTES. 



STARRETT 

TUNGSTEN STEEL 

HACKSAWS 



ABSOLUTELY UNIFORM IN 

QUALITY AND TEMPER. 

THE PECULIAR SETTING 

OF THE TEETH IN THESE 

SAWS GIVES THEM FULL 

STRENGTH. NO TOOTH 

BREAKAGE LIKE 

MOST BLADES. 

m m 

THEY STAND UP 
TO ALL WORK 
A HACK SAW 
SHOULD DO. 



Made 



Sf L. S. Starrett Co., ™ 



Sold by 



^mdM^maorA^ 



MONTREAL AND WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 





TEEL OOMPANY OF UANADA 

Limited 

Bell Brand /£v\ Horseshoes 



TRADE f ■ ^ 1 MARK 




REGISTERED 



Accurate Crease, Exact Punching, Correct 

and Uniform Shape. 

Horse Nails Wire Nails 

Bar Iron Bar Steel 

Bolts and Nuts, Screws, Tacks, Bright Wire Goods, 
Wrought Pipe, Iron and Steel Wire, Field Fencing. 

District Sales Offices: 

Hamilton Toronto Montreal Winnipeg 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B C. H. G. Rogers, St John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Samson Tools 




Made to give satis- 
faction - not merely 
to sell. And they 
satisfy so completely 
that one tool sells an- 
other. 



Wmmm 



Repeat orders are coming to us at a 
good rate. Your stock may need at- 
tention. Order Samson Harvest Tools 
now. We aim to sell the best tools 
possible, and to have the quality in them 
to " make good." 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



TORONTO 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




BUTTS 



AND 



HINGES 



Scientifically made by expert workmen on rapid modern 
machinery are not too good for you. Keep a full stock 
of all sizes — Demand them from your jobber. 

CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 



HAMILTON 



MANUFACTURERS 



CANADA 



Davidson's Family Flour Caris-n 



Round— with overlapping Covers. Can be supplied 
Plain White, Japanned, or in Assorted Colors. 

Three Sizes, 25, 50 and 100 lbs. 




Ther'Empire" Flour Can 

TAKES UP LITTLE SPACE 
MADE TO HANG ON WALL OR DOOR 



Half Round Front, Flat Back, with hinge Cover 
White Japanned finish and lettered in gold 

Capacity 50 pounds 

Dimensions 18 in. high, 15 in. wide 




Pig 405 



WRITEIFOR PRICES 



Fig 405 A 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited 



MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"GET A RECEIPT" 




8898NQV.I9 
•D 77.77 



PETERBOROUGH 
HARDWARE 
COMPANY 
PETERBOROUGH 



Return This Check 
In Case Of Error 
It Is Your Receipt 



Putting a Receipt in Every Parcel 
Benefits the Customer 

It prevents disputes. Prevents overcharging. 

Prevents mistakes in change. Stops mistakes in 
charge accounts. 

Insures a proper record of money paid on account. 

Gives information about special sales and new lines of 
goods handled by the merchant. 

Protects children and servants by giving them a 
receipt to take home. 

Shows which clerk waits on each customer, and in 
case goods are exchanged proves the price paid 
and date purchased. 



Putting a Receipt in Every Parcel 
Benefits the Merchant 

It stops mistakes. Stops losses. Removes temptation. 
Increases trade. Increases profits. 

BECAUSE It enforces a correct record of 
All cash sales. All credit sales. 
All money received on account and all money 
paid out. 
It wins the confidence of the public. Makes every 

sale advertise your business. Satisfies customers. 
Makes each clerk responsible for the way he serves 

customers. 
Every merchant's success depends on whether his 
methods of handling his business gives the above 
results. 



National Cash Register 
Receipts protect millions of 
customers daily against 
mistakes and carelessness. 



Considering the material, work- 
manship, and what they do, 
National Cash Registers are the 
lowest priced machinery made. 

They sell from $13.00 to $870.00. 



National Cash Register 
Receipts protect hundreds 
of thousands of merchants 
daily 



Ask for complete information about the "Get a Receipt" plan. Write 
THE NATIONAL CASH REGISTER CO., F E ■™™W%SSg 1 ft8%S£. Toronto im 



9 



HARDWA R E A N I) ME T A L 



Implement Works 

For Sale By Tender 

Tenders will be received by the undersigned at their 
offices, 33 Scott Street, Toronto, up to twelve o'clock 
noon of Wednesday, July 19th, 1911, for the 
purchase as a going concern, of the Assets of 

The Wilkinson Plough Co. 



IMPLEMENT MANUFACTURERS 



Limited 



West Toronto Ontario, Canada 

CONSISTING OF 



LOT NO. 1.— REAL ESTATE, being 8% acres, more 
or less, on Brandon and Campbell 
Streets, West Toronto (Further par- 
ticulars may be obtained at the offices 

of the undersigned). Valued at $ 83,500.00 

Eleven buildings and erections there- 
on, including wood-working factory; 
shipping room ; storage and office 
building; blacksmith, machine and 
grinding shops; erecting shop; 
moulding shop ; scraper factory. All 
valued at $69,350.00 



$152,850.00 
Subject to Mortgage thereon, with 
Interest computed to June 1st, 1911.. $52,167.00 



Equity $100,683.00 

EOT NO. 2.— PLANT 

Machinery as per Inventory $48,286.19 
Shafting & Hangers; Pulleys; 
Belting; Tools; Scales; Dies, 

Etc., amounting to 22,206.57 

Patterns 7,613.45 

Patents 6,337.13 

Horses, Wagons, Etc 1,458.95 

Office Furniture, Etc 987.36 $86,889.65 



LOT NO. 3. — Toledo Steam Hammer Press 
Equipment, Valued at 



and 



13,000.00 



Forward $200,572.65 



Forward $200,572.65 

LOT NO. 4.— MERCHANDISE, AS UNDER: 

Walking Ploughs and parts $24 

Snow Ploughs 

Disc Ploughs 5, 

Gangs 1, 

Sulkies 1. 

Sleighs 6, 

Spreaders 4, 

Wheel Scrapers 5, 



Drag Scrapers 4, 

Wheel Barrows 2, 

Drag Harrows 1, 

Disc Harrows 

Ensilage & Straw Cutters.. 8, 

Dump Wagons 2, 

Dump Carts 

Rollers 2 

Furnaces 

Stable Fittings 

Bolts, Screw, etc 3 

Rivets 

Iron & Steel Bars 6 

Sundries 4 

Coke, Sand, Etc 

Paints, Oils, Etc 

Pig & Scrap Iron 2 

Lumber 8, 



,658.67 
625.76 
038.64 
547.21 
105.63 
,558.37 
,893.91 
,368.46 
,289.27 
,778.57 
568.81 
292.31 
,661.16 
,168.30 
244.81 
,517.91 
621.36 
189.79 
,578.86 
179.89 
,345.74 
,905.84 
370.24 
969.03 
,953.50 
,291.56 



LOT NO. 5. — Wagons and Parts, as per List 



$100,623.30 
7,191.00 



Total $308,386.95 



Tenders will be received for the five lots together, in which event Tenderers must state the amounts tendered for each lot 
separately. Tenders will also be received for each lot separately. 

The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 

Lot No. 1 is offered subject to conditions of sale which may be inspected at the offices of the undersigned. 

The Purchaser of Lot No. 1 must assume the mortgage and interest thereon. The Purchaser of the five lots will be given 
the benefit of all sales and manufacturing since April 22nd, 1911, and must pay all outlays for labor, expenses, and for supplies 
and materials purchased since such date. 

TERMS OF SALE. — One quarter cash (10 per cent at time of sale) balance in 3, 6 and 9 months with interest at 7 per cent, 
per annum, secured to the satisfaction of the Assignee. 

A certified cheque for 10 per cent, of the amount of tender must accompany each tender, which cheque will be returned If 
tender is not accepted. 

Other conditions o* sale may be seen upon application to the undersigned. 



E. R. C. CLARKSON 4L SONS 

Assignees 
33 Scott Street, TORONTO 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





IN PACKAGES 

You don't need to be an expert at figuring to see where you make 
more profit by handling 

Brantford All Around Glue 

(It's Granulated) t 

No weighing, no waste, no loss, no mess, no wrapping and tying — a simple, clean, 
handy, attractive package in three sizes, 1 lb., */2 lb. and J4 lb., selling respectively at a 
quarter, fifteen cents and ten cents. 

It's good for gluing anything. Carpenters and Cabinet-makers want it, so do 
householders. Keep it where they can't help seeing it, it is a self-seller. 

Your jobber sells it, ask him, or write us direct. 

CANADA GLUE CO., Limited 



BRANTFORD, 



CANADA 



There is a tide in the affairs of men 
Which, taken at the flood. 
Leads on to fortune. 

— Juliut Catsar 




Do not Hesitate 



■When the right opportunity presents itself. 



In tne race for fortune, the man who grasps his opportunities is the man who wins. 
A word to the wise is sufficient. 

Never be without a stock of 



HEADQUARTERS 
FOR 

Lead Pipe 

Lead Waste 

Traps and Bends 

Sheet Lead 

Solder, &c. 



HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE 

(THE COPPER COATED CAKE) 

THE BABBITT METAL WITHOUT A FAULT 

It is used from Coast to Coast. Is highly satisfactory wherever used. 
C*Mp TW P^T^T? ^i \C TV! f*\ \KT A G °° d ,h ' ng 3nd specify HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE. Experience has proven that it posi" 

HARDWAREMEN KNOW 

THE CANADA METAL COMPANY LTD. 



tively eliminates friction and runs cool at any speed. 

A good thing and buy the Babbitt Metal without a fault. 
PRESSURE is good to stock It brings repeat orders. 



HARRIS HEAVY 



Fraser Avenue, TORONTO 



11 



HARDWARE AJND METAL 



THE HEART OF A 
BABBITT METAL 




The United States Government made a radical departure from orthodox methods when they tested 
Magnolia, using water as a lubricant. 

This test in connection with the tests they made using oil as a lubricant furnishes valuable com- 
parative data. 

For instance, in the oil test, Magnolia showed only 25% superiority anti-frictionally, but in the 
water test it proved to be 200% superior to a high grade babbitt of the conventional kind, and 
1100% superior to White Brass. 

This demonstrates that a good lubricant will bolster up to a considerable extent even an ordinary 
grade babbitt, if plentifully supplied, but when water is used you get at the very heart of a babbitt 
and prove its true inherent value. This is worth knowing, because the oil supply gives out some- 
times or the oil holes become clogged or the quality of the oil is inferior. 

Engineers who study these problems will realize that this wonderful showing of Magnolia was due 
to its very low coefficient of friction ; they also appreciate that a metal that does not become hot is 
not liable to squash and wears very slowly. 

We lay particular stress upon this quality of Magnolia because it means safety and economy in 
every way and minimizes loss of power. 




Special Offer 



PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET BOOK. 680 
pages, over 2,000 subjects, We do not aim to make 
a profit on this book, as it is an advertisement, 
therefore offer it at the very low price of 40c, 
postpaid. Many Engineers pronounce it invaluable, 
Address Montreal office- 



Sold by Leading Dealers Everywhere or by 

Magnolia Metal Co. 



225 St. Ambroise Street 
NEW YORK 



MONTREAL 
CHICAGO 



"THE NAMES THE GUARANTEE 




W 



Backed by a reputation of 130 years. 

SAWS, EDGE TOOLS, FILES, STEEL, SHOVELS 



D 271. 

Two Speed, with ball thrust. 
Nickel-plated parts, black and 
red japanned with one pair of 
jaws each, plain and crocodile, 
rosewood handles. 

Price $3.40 each. 

D 272. 

One speed ditto bright, one 
pair plain jaws. 



D 266. 

Best Lignum Head, ball 
bearing, plate on head, 
rosewood handle, 
heavily nickel-plated. 

Sweep 8 in. $2.35 each. 
Sweep 10 in. $2.50 each. 



Price $2.20 each. 

DUTY PAID, Subject to Discount. 

For our New Tool Catalogue apply to 

Sole Canadian Representative : 

A. HENDERSON, Spear & Jackson, ltd. 



Metals and Hardware, MONTREAL. 



SHEFFIELD, England 




D266 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




10 Foot Power Press or Brake 

Capacity, No. 10 Gauge Soft Steei. 
Weight, 28,000 lbs. 



This machine is of the most MODERN design and embraces 
new features that are a distinct advantage. It is complete 
in every respect. Manufacturers of METAL "WINDOW 
FRAMES AND SASH, FIRE-PROOF DOORS, ETC., will 
find it a most economical investment. 



WRITE FOR PRICE AND FURTHER PARTICULARS 

THE BROWN, BOGGS CO., Ltd., HAMILTON, ONT 

TINSMITHS' TOOLS, SHEET METAL WORKERS' TOOLS, PRESSES, DIES 

13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




HIGHEST 
QUALITY 



QUICK 
SALES 



Griswold Hardware 

Griswold Hardware is specified by most of the 
leading hardware stores throughout the Dominion. 
Why don't you get acquainted with the Griswold 
line? It gives the best of satisfaction wherever used, 
and has proved to be the surest way of increasing 
trade. 

Our trade mark is the assurance of quality. 

Our products include FOOD CHOPPERS in 
many sizes, WAFFLE IRONS, GAS STOVES and 
RANGES of various kinds. 

Write for catalog and prices. 



The Griswold Mfg. Co. 

ERIE, PA. 






The Aylmer 
Windmill 
Force Pump 



Mr. Dealer : It will pay you 
to write for our illustrated 
Catalogues of Double and 
Single Acting Force and Lift, Hand, 
Windmill and Power Pumps; Hay, Stock, 
Portable Platform, Union, Dairy and 
Butcher Scales. Goods right and prices 
are right. 

The Aylmer Pump & Scale Co, Limited 

AYLMER, ONTARIO 

WESTERN REPRESENTATIVES : 

The Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., Limited 




WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 




Sell "Safe-Lock" 

the strongest fenoe made. 

Before you order any more fenc- 
ing, just note the "Safe-Lock" — 
it cannot slip. 

Strand wires in the "SAFE-LOCK" Fence do 
not have to lose strength by being kinked— the 
lock holds without it. 

This feature is a great selling point — it means 
greater strength, greater durability, greater value 
for your customer's money. 

The man who ham 4he "Safo-LocW 
Agency In your locality villi Jumt 
naturally get the bulk of the trade. 

You be the man — write us for Catalog and Prices 
Write us to-day. 



The Owen Sound Wire 
Fence Co., Limited 

Owen Sound, Ontario 

Western Agents 

Brandon Safe-Look Fence Co. 

Brandon, - - Man. 




14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



<&*9r(3ez> 



A \Vatp*ili( 



Sleepmeter 




Height 7 inches. Dial 4-yi inches. 
Rings steadily for 5 minutes, intermittently for 10. 



HERE'S Big Ben — he's not quite a year old, 
but in less than a year, he's proven in the 
States the biggest clock success that we have 
ever known. — Today, ten months afte& his 
appearance, 12,000 jewelers — 60 per cent, of the total 
United States number — sell him at the rate of 2,000 a day, 
at the highest figure that's ever been quoted. 

We have now completed steps to introduce Big Ben to 
the Canadian trade on as extensive a scale as we did in 
the United States. Beginning with September we will ex- 
tend our campaign to all the leading Canadian publications 
and in order to enable Canadian dealers to get the max- 
imum benefit from our advertising, we are packing Big 



Ben specially for Canadian trade, 6 in a carton with a 
full set of Store Selling Helps (2 posters, 2 show cards, 2 
metal signs) . 

On an order for 12 we add a solid mahogany display 
stand. On an order for 24 or more we print your name 
on dials, give you the posters, display stand and a beautiful 
metal sign lithographed in five colors. 

The retail Canadian price has been fixed at $3.00. You 
can sell him for more if you want but you may not sell 
him for less. — Big Ben is already carried in stock by 34 
Canadian wholesalers. We shall be glad to let you have 
their names upon request. 



In broken and dozen lots, $2.20 less 5%. In case lots of 24^ $2.10 less 5 %. 

• The Western Clock Mfg. Co. 
La Salle, Illinois 



15 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CERTAINTY IS WHAT A MAN SEEKS IN EVERYTHING 

The man who buys a 

Model 10 Visible 

Remington 



Typewriter 




buys absolute certainty; a certainty of satisfaction guaranteed by the 
greatest typewriter makers in the world 

Remington Typewriter Company, Limited 



18 Victoria Square 



Montreal, Can. 




Here's your chance for a brisk, profitable trade. Such 
trade comes easily to the dealer handling 

Acorn Corrugated 

Galvanized 

Sheets 

which are made of metal so gal- 
vanized that it readily passes the 
severe tests that British Govern- 
ment requires of such building 
materials. These Sheets are high- 
est quality, yet cost no more than 
ordinary, uncertain kinds. And 
you can DEPEND on Acorn Cor- 
rugated Sheets, for they are 

A CCURATELY MADE 

Our powerful machines stamp each corrugation separ- 
ately and make them absolutely accurate. Therefore, they 
fit together perfectly and are easily erected. For moder- 
ate-priced constructions, repairing old buildings, etc., they 
are unequalled in value. Build a reputation by selling 
Acorn Quality Sheets. Thus you get a grip on the trade 
you want. Large stocks always ready for shipment. Get 
full particulars. 




METAL SHINGLE & SIDING C? LTD. 

~l PRESTON & MONTREAL C 




BOYS', GIRLS' and BABIES' SLEIGHS 

with iron or wooden runners — sleighs that are built 
for service and durability. 

We sell more sleighs than any other company in 
the Dominion. Our success is due to the selling of 
quality goods. WRITE FOR CATALOG. 

The Gendron Mfg. Co., Limited 



DUCHESS STREET, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This trademark has a vital meaning to your customers. They are familiar with it 
because of the steady, striking national advertising of Genasco in the leading magazines 




and agricultural papers. They know it stands for 



Genasco 

The Trinidad-Lake-Asphalt Roofing 



And back of Trinidad Lake Asphalt is the natural quality in its make-up that gives Genasco long life. 
You don't need to try hard to convince your customers — our advertising does that for you. 
You do need to have a stock that they can buy from, and you ought to have it when they want it. 

The Kant-leak Kleet is a Genasco adjunct that makes it twice as easy to apply. Makes seams absolutely water-tight 
ind prevents nail-leaks. 

Order Genasco from your jobber with Kant-leak Kleets packed in the roll. 



THE BARBER ASPHALT PAVING COMPANY 

^'Largest producers of asphalt, and larg-est manufacturers of ready roofing in the world. 

PHILADELPHIA 



Gross-section Genasco Model Roofing 



Asphalt-saturated Wool Felt 
Trinidad Lake Asphalt 
Asphalt-saturatad Burlap 
Trinidad Lake Asphalt 



New York 



San Francisco 



Chicago 



Caverhill, Learmont & Company, Montreal. 

tXH. Howden & Co., Limited, 20j York St., London, Ontario 




Digging Asphalt from Trinidad Lake and transporting it for Genasco Roofing 



MEAttlNS' 

SANITARY WASHBOARDS 

Have the qualities which recommend them to particular 
buyers. 

These washboards are of metal construc- 
tion throughout and have no wood to warp 
and no nails to come loose or rough edges 
of zinc to cut hands. They cannot retain 
dirt because each board is made in one 
piece. 



Send for Particulars and Prices to 

Meakins & Sons, Hamilton, Ont. t 




No Dirt 
Can Lodge 

in the 
"All-Metal" 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





A NEW VALVE 

JENKINS BROS/ 

GUN METAL AND IRON BODY 

GATE VALVES 

" TYPE K " 

Special Features : 

Highest Quality Steam Metal. Perfect Intel-changeability. Double Compensating Bronze Wedges. 
Metal Gland in Stuffing-Box. Great Strength of AH Parts. Carefully tested to 250-lbs. Water Pressure 

UNRIVALLED IN DESIGN AND WORKMANSHIP 

A Thoroughly Reliable Gate Valve for Steam, Water, Oil, Gas or Air. A trial will convince you that it 
will pay you to use these valves on all your work. 

Stamped with TRADE MARK like cut. 

Stocked by Machinery, Hardware and Supply Dealers throughout the World. 



Catalogue and Full Particulars Cheerfully Furnished on Application. 

JENKINS BROS., Limited 



Head Office and Works: 
102 St. Remi St., Montreal, Canada 



And at 
95 Queen Victoria St., London, E.C. 




GLASS CUTTERS 

WHY are our ten styles of Glass Cutters more extensively sold than 
any other ? Because they give the user more cutting than^every other. 

why? •"~rr 

Because every wheel is ground and honed by hand,'and t every one 
is tested on glass. There are no poor wheels. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 



ts/tw/bm/l/KL, 



GREENFIELD, 



MASS., U.S.A. 




o y 

S IB 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

" Comet " Brand 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makers 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sola Canadian Sales Agent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

13 St. John Street - Montreal 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Died In factories of all kind* for 
harried machine repairs. 

All machine ihopi and railway 
■hops ahonld have It. 

Bridge builder., track lajeri, 
and itrnctnral metal worker* 
haye conitant me for It. 

Send for Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER ONTARIO 




BUY THE BEST 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

HFRPIII F\ starBrandcottonci ° thesLines 



SASH CORD 



Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by All Wholesale Dealers 




ON DON BAR IRON 

is the best line of bar iron 
that money can buy. It pos- 
sesses a uniformity of tex- 
ture, toughness, and easy 
workability that means 
perfect satisfaction both to 
you and to your customers. 
And the price is as low as 
we can make it without 
sacrificing anything of its 
quality. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON CANADA 

SALES AGENTS 
Ontario — Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba — Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 




Three 
One 



We have just 
issued under one 
cover new booklet 
containing 

First 

illustrations. 

Second 

descriptive matter. 

Third 

list prices of our 
complete line of 

Furnaces and 
Furnace Materials 

and 

Boilers and 
Boiler Materials 

Copies have 
already been 
mailed to our 
numerous customers 
in Ontario. 
Possibly some 
have been overlooked. 
Have you received 
a copy? 

If not, communicate 
with us to-day. 

Pease Foundry Company 

LIMITED 

Toronto, :: 



Canada 



Pease Waldon Company 



Winnipeg, 



LIMITED- 



Canada 



We manufacture and stock 
all materials required in con- 
nection with Warm Air, Hot 
Water and Steam Heating 
Installations. 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Saskatchewan Glass and Supply Company, Ltd 



WHOLESALE IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Glass and Builders 9 Supplies 



WE CARRY A FULL STOCK OF THE FOLLOWING: 



Polished Plate Glass 
Window and Leaded Glas4 
Fancy and Wired Glass 
Mirrors and Bevelled Plates 
Plasters, Limes and Cements 

No order too large or too small. 



Building and Sheathing Papers 

Felt and Asbestos Papers 

Rubber Roofings and Roofing Papers 

Nails and Sash Pins 

Putty and Glaziers' Points 

Prompt shipments our specialty. 



Metallic Ceilings and Cornices 
Metallic Shingles and Sidings 
Sewer Pipe and Tilings 
Plasterers' Hair, Sash Bars, Brick 
Mantels, Grates and Tile. 

Correspondence Solicited. 



P O. BOX 67q 



Cor. Manitoba and Sixth Avenue 

MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN 



TELEPHONE 348 



— "■ 






Convex Reversible 'Wafer, " Upright.' 



REGISTERS 

All Known Sizes, Shapes and Finishes 

The Genuine Convex Reversible 
Wafer works either way, by 
simply changing two screws. 

All Varieties of Registers, 
Faces and Borders supplied 

■ .i... .c_:_i_ Convex Reversible 'Wafer, ' Across." 

in any quantity or finish. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co. *%£$£* 



mm 



MMMiHMMMMaiMHiSli 



Quality Right! 




Prices Right! 



There is a new era of profit-making open to every hardwareman who is featuring the complete 



GREENING LINE 



Quality in the goods we manufacture is our first consideration, and we have the plant and 
facilities to turn out the real 'quality' article, at a price that is no higher than that of inferior 
goods. Of special interest to the hardwareman are: — 



GREENING'S 



STEEL WIRE CHAINS 

WIRE CLOTH 

WIRE ROPE 

COW TIES 

SPARK-PROOF WIRE GUARDS 

WIRE DOOR MATS 



Study your Greening Catalogue. It contains profit possibilities for every hardwareman. 

The B. Greening Wire Company, Limited 

Hamilton, Montreal and Winnipeg 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PARKER'S 

f Quick Working, 

Efficient, 

Convenient, 

SWIVEL 

VICTOR 

VISES 

ASSURE ECONOMY 

By one motion of either right or left hand any 
piece of work can be instantly grasped in the 
Parker vise. 

The leading feature of all our vises is the solid 
steel strenghening bar, also solid under portion 
of front jaw. 

Parker's vises are made by expert men who make 
this line their specialty. 

All parts are interchangeable. 

The Charles Parker Co. 

Meriden, Conn., U.S A. 




Copp's Stoves 
and Ranges 

SILVER QUEEN 




Our new medium 
priced up-to-date 
Range. 

It will pay you to 
nvestigateits 
merits. 



'The Western Stove Makers 



J, 




©H<!t€<Q 



Fort William, Winnipeg. Vancouver. 



Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 

Headquarters for Limited 

Side Wall and Floor Registers and Faces 





MOORISH DESIGN C\ST REGISTER 
Made in full sizes from 7x10 to 12x15 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 
New design, made in 8x10 and 9x12 sizes 



Our "EMPIRE SPECIAL" 

is an especially neat and attractive new design, and meets the demand for a register with a larger opening. 
Is a sure winner, and sells at a moderate price. Ask us for particulars. Manufactured by us at 



o 



wen 



Sound 



Ontario 



CHRISTIE BROS. CO. 
Cor. Park and Henry Sts , Winnipeg 



Western Agents 



M C, DREW & SON 
Vancouver, B.C. 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hamilton Jewel Gas Ranges 

forJMANUFACTURED or NATURAL GAS are made in over 125IVARIETIES 
and Every Requirement can be Supplied. 




The Ovens have Spring 
Balanced Drop Doors. The 
Valves, Airmixers and other 
trimmings are all nickel plated. 
Galvanized Dust Tray under Top 
Burners. The body of Range is 
Asbestos Linked. All these 
Ranges are equipped with 
Grave's Patent Safety Lighters 
— see cut above. This lighter is 
far superior to the old style 
Pilot Light. It is absolutely safe 
because the oven door must be 
opened before the Oven Burners 
can be lighted, and thus all 
possibility of explosion through 
accidental accumulation of gas in 
the oven is avoided. 

A Thermometer for regis- 
tering the heat of Oven can be 
attached to the Oven door of 
any Hamilton Jewel Gas Range. 

These Ranges can be fitted 
with Hot Water Heating attach- 
ments, or with Reservoirs or 
Side Broilers, and Top can be 
extended if desired. 



Large Hotel 
Ranges 

are "supplied in every style. 



No. 
15 
20 
30 
40 
50 
(50 
65 



No. 

70 
80 
90 
95 



Single Oven 

Size oi Oven Size of Top 



17x12x12 in. 
17x12x12 in. 
16xl6xllf in - 
15Jxl6ixll in. 
16Jxl6Jxll in. 
18xl6Jxll in. 
19x18^x12 in. 



22x19 in. 

32x19 in. 
35$x22| in. 
35£x22J in. 
36|x22J in. 
38.ix22 4 L in. 
39x24i in. 



Double Oven 



Size of Oven 
151x16^x11 
16Jxl6£xll 
18xl6Jxll 
19x18$ xl2 



Size of Top 
15jxl6x8£ 
16£xl6x8£ 
18xl6x8J 
19x181^x8 





Elevated Oven 

Ranges are made in many 
different styles which are fully 
described in our Catalogue 
No. 69. 



We also make various 



styles of 

Side Oven 

Ranges, which we have not 
room to illustrate here. 



If you have not got our 
catalogue, write us for one. 

All Ranges are thoroughly 
tested before leaving factory. 



Each Range is fitted with 

Jewel Adjustable 
Needle Valve 

which gives perfect control of 
gas supply. For accurate 
mechanical construction and 
satisfactory working, no other 
valve equals it, 

Get our Catalogue 
No. 69 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

Head Office and Factory at HAMILTON Winnipeg Branch, 130 James Ave. 

Agencies at Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver. 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SUMMER SPECIALTIES 

Asbestos -Lined Covers 
for Mrs. Potts 1 Irons 

This cover is made from two separate steel covers with heavy 
asbestos between : made to cover a set of three irons. It is used 
on Gas, Gasolene, Oil or Wood Stoves or Ranges, and will 
save the price of itself in fuel in a very short time. 



IIP 



Measuring Cups 

Marked for Measuring One- 

quarter and One-third 

Cups. 



Strainer Funnels 

(Strainer and Funnel Combined) 





GREATLY FACILITATE THE WORK IN THE KITCHE* 



A QUICK FIRE AND A GOOD OVEN 

That is what 

The " LeRoy " 

means 

And that's what campers and 
summer cottagers require. 
The "LeRoy" is just the 
range for the summer season. 
It has a good oven, therefore 
campers need not do without 
any of the pastry delicacies 
of home. It fires up quickly, 
and cools equally fast when the 
fire is quenched. Can be 
supplied with legs. 

SUGGEST THIS RANGE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 

Mc CLARY'S 




Style 9C 



LONDON 


WINNIPEG 


TORONTO 


VANCOUVER 


MONTREAL 


ST. JOHN 



HAMILTON 
CALGARY 
SASKATOON 



23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



-PUMPS- 

All Hinds 
Hay Unloading Tools. 
Darn Door Hangers. 

The word "MYERS"' assures 
QUALITY. Better write to us. 

F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND, OHIO 

J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary and Branch House* 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford copper Co. 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 



Attention! 



H«iV» Ilia tin* of splendid Milan 




DELTA 



SUPERIORITY 

FILES 

OF 
QUALITY. 



Are you handling the 

Buster Brown 

Children's Express Wagons ? 

They are beautifully made, painted, 
strong 1 and easy-running. Handy 
around farm, home or store. 

In 4 size*. Send for prices. 

WOODSTOCK WAGON &MF6. CO., LTD. 

WOODSTOCK, ONT 
Western Represents t itbs 

JAS. STEWART MFG. CO.. LTD., Winnipeg, Mm. 



A CONVENIENT CLOTHES RACK 




This High-grade rack can be fas- 
tened to the wall near a stove or range. 

When closed it projects only i i-» in. 
When extended, and all the bails are 
down, it stands out only 14 ins. from 
the wall and has a drying space of 19 
feet. 

Each bail can be lowered separately 
without interfering with the others. 

The sides of the rack are made of 
hardwood — the bails of galvanized 
steel, bent so as to be self supporting 
when in use. 

The price of the rack is $1.25 retail, 
manufacturers' price $9.00 per doz. 

This is a sure seller. Order from 
your wholesaler or direct from us. 

Modern Machinery Co. 

SARNIA, ONT. 



24 



"DELTA 
SPECIAL" 



This file is made very 
slim and blunt to file 
Panel and all fine 
tooth saws. It has 
more teeth to the inch 
and has a sharper edge 
than other files so as 
to leave a clean gullet 
and a smooth, even 
tooth on the saw after 
filing. Made of 

S. & C. Wardlow's 
Best English Steel. 

A Hand Saw File of 
unusual quality and 
temper. 

Delta Files have every 
advantage in the mak- 
ing and give every 
facility in the using. 
Write for information 
and prices. 

They bring results. 




DELTA 

DELTA 
File Works 

PHILADELPHIA, Pa., U.S.A. 
Chicago Office : 108 W. Lake St. 

( anadian Selling Agents 
H. S. Howland, Sons & Company, 



Stark-Seybold, 

Wm. Stairs, Son & Morrow. 



Toronto 

Montreal 

Halifax 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Write us for sees* 



PRICES. 



The Bridgeport Hardware Mfg. Corp. 

BRIDGEPORT, CONN., U.S.A. 







• 


9 


"GOOD CHEER" Sidewall Registers 




A line in four sizes, of uniform design throughout. Neat and tastefnl pattern, and 
supplied in black Japan, ordinary oxidized or full oxidized finish, with enamelled green 
fan. Our ordinary oxidized will about equal the more expensive fnll oxidized finish 
of other makes. \ 

Positive acting- fan — stays exactly where set, and when closed locks tight. No 
springs, etc., to weaken or loosen. 

The price? It will pay yon to inquire. 

A full line of the above carried by The Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Man. 






mmmmmmmmi 


The Jas. Stewart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 








Woodstock, Ontario 










KILLS GERMS 

DESTROYS MOTHS 

BRIGHTENS RUGS 

PREVENTS DUST 



EFFECT A CLEAN-UP FOR YOURSELF 

Be the agent in your district for 

SOCLEAN 

A large business is to be done by advertising 
SOCLEAN. Why not start a cleaning cam- 
paign at your store? We furnish you with 
window cards and counter advertising, suggest 
helps for your window decoration if you ask us. 
Make it a real big campaign, the goods are 
worthy of it, and the profit will make it well 
worth your efforts. 



WRITE DEPT. "H. 



SOCLEAN LIMITED 

444 King St. West TORONTO Phone Adelaide 1584 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The REAL 
3-MINUTE " 



ALA SKA 



" The Freezer with the Aerating 
Spoon Dasher." 

Special Features 

AERATING SPOON DASHER 
NOVEL ICE GUARD 
DOUBLE WOOD SCRAPERS 
EVERY FREEZER GUARANTEED 

Other Selling Points 

MAKES THE SMOOTHEST CREAM 
MOST ECONOMICAL IN ICE AND SALT 
QUICKEST FREEZING 
SIMPLEST IN CONSTRUCTION 

ALASKA FREEZERS 
PAY BIG PROFITS 

in money and good will. 
Write for Prices and Terms. 



THE SHEET METAL 
PRODUCTS CO. 



OF CANADA, LTD. 

Selling Agents for 
Canada 

Montreal 

TORONTO 

Winnipeg 



"y^afi : 




Quality Did It 

Back in 1864 the Nicholson File 
Co. started making files with an 
output of ioo dozen a day to 
supply a local market. At the 
present time the files made by 
the Nicholson File Company 
sell at the rate of 16,000 dozen 
a day, and the market is the 
whole civilized world. 

These are the well-known 
brands made by the Nicholson 
File Co. in Canada : 



" American n 

"Arcade" 

"Great Western 

"Globe" 



"Eagle" 

"McLellan" 

Kearney & Foot 

"J. B. Smith" 



All steel used in 
Nicholson Files is made 
strictly according to our 
own specifications which 
have been adopted after 
many ye^rs of experiment. And 
we use different grades of steel for 
different kinds of files. As a re- 
sult, Nicholson-Made Files are the 
fastest cutting tools of their kind 
in the world. 
Your Jobber can Supply you. 

NICHOLSON 
FILE CO. 

(Dominion Works) 

PORT HOPE, - - ONT. 







HARDWARE AND METAL 



Established 1868 



J. HISRCHHORN 



148-149 KOPENICKER ST. BERLIN, GERMANY 

Lighting Experts and Manufacturers of 



Electrical and Gas Fittings, Kerosene 
Burners and Lamps, Incandescent 
Kerosene Mantle Burners, Kerosene 
Heating and Cooking Stoves. 

For 1911 we are Putting on the Market 

The " Carmen " Kerosene Incandescent Air-Draught 

Table Lamps 

The "J. H." Intensifying Kerosene Inverted 
Lanterns ( wi *°£ ss a £i ficiaI ) 

Constructed upon Entirely New and Scientific Principles 

GOOD AGENTS WANTED THROUGHOUT CANADA 




THE "CARMEN 



Telegrams : 

"Kerosina, Berlin, 

Germany 




THE "J H." LAMP 



Code : 
ABC, 5th Edition 




Good Machinists Prefer 

Slocomb 



Micrometer Calipers 



for the simple reason that they are absolutely accurate and are the 
most durable tools of the kind made in the world. Dealers can in- 
crease sales of ALL TOOLS by putting in a stock of Slocomb 
Calipers and letting local machinists know about it. 

EThey are made in all sizes from to 24 inch and from to 600 m. m. metric. 

J. T. SLOCOMB CO., Providence, R.I., U.S.A. 

CANADIAN AGENTS:— Wood, Vallanc* Co.. Hamilton and Toronto. Ont. : Aikenhead Hardware Co., Toronto: Foss and Fuller. Montreal 




The satisfied smile, 

Happy and bright. 
He's making a pile 

By using FLUXITE. 



THE PRACTICAL 
MAN USES 



FLUXITE 



The Paste Flux That 

I M PLIFIES SOL_DE: 
AND SUPERSEDES LEAD BURNING 



RING 



It solders even dirty metals without cleaning and without corrosion. It joints lead 
without solder, merely by the use of a blow-lamp or blow-pipe. Anyone can do soldering 
work with Fluxlte. It is a necessity in the tool kit of every motor car, workshop and 
home. Easy to use. easy to sell. 

REMEMBER IT IN YOUR INDENTS. 

Pncked in small and large tins. Made by 

THE AUTO CONTROLLER CO., 2U J&ndonT d s J e . r EN n G d " y 

27 ^^mi^—^—^ 



1 1 A RDWARE AND METAL 



Tl I KGRAMS; 'BIGSBY. MITCHAM 



(Established 1840) 



W. T. BIGSBY C& SONS, 



CODE : A B C— 5th EDITION 

MITCHAM, 
LONDON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



OIL AND SPIRIT VARNISHES, JAPANS, LACQUERS, 
PAINTS, ENAMELS AND TURPENTINE SUBSTITUTE 

FQR THE USE OF 

Railway Companies, Shipbuilders, Electr cal and other Engineers, Coachbuilders, Makers of Bodies for Vehicles 

of all Kinds, Builders, House Painters, Ironmongers, Oil and Colourmen, Cabinet and 

Furniture Makers. Tm-Plate Printers, etc., etc. 

LITHOGRAPHIC and LETTERPRESS PRINTING INKS 

For Newspapers, Magazines, Advertisement Posters, Art Calendars and Other High-Class Work, 

Tin-Plate and Cardbord Printers, etc. 

Our Agents in Quebec and Ontario are: THE MOUNT ROYAL COLOR & VARNISH CO., 193 Dorchester St. East, Montreal. 

For Brit'sh Columbia— AMES BROS., Box 355, Vancouver, B.C. 

Saskatchewan, Alberta, Assiniboia and Manitoba — G. H. SAYWELL, Saskatoon. 

Mr. Saywell will shortly be calling on you to fix up Agencies 





Everything is accessible 



WHEREVER OUR 




BICYCLE STEP-LADDER 



IS USED. 



Build your shelving from floor to ceiling and economize 
space. No matter how high your shelving may be we have 
a ladder to meet your demands — a ladder that satisfies both 
climbing need and the easy sliding requirement. 

Our Bicycle Step Ladders are built of hardwood in any 
finish you desire and are guaranteed to be the most 
durable on the market. 



WRITE FOR CATALOG AND PRICES. 

The Hamilton Brass Mfg. Company, Limited 

Hamilton, Ont., and Montreal, P.O. 



-i A A 



^ GROW, DEALERS! SPREAD OUT! 

wmJ^mm Put vourself in a position to take any kind of a roofing 



Al A "A A A 
A A "UI 



Put yourself in a position to take any kind of a roofing 
contract. With 



"CROWN" 



PATENT 
STEEL 



SHINGLES 



you have a better proposition than the slater can possibly 
offer. Get some (or all) of that business you've had to 
lose to him for so long. Get started to-day— right now, 
by writing for our catalogue and price lists. At the same time we'll send you our samples, 

charges prepaid. Write at once to 

McFARLANE 6 DOUGLAS, Limited, 2so-2go s/ater street, Ottawa, Ont. 

" 28 " 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Curved Troudh 





Any Size, Any Style, Any Sweep 




We specialize on it. That's how we turn it out so 
quickly, so neatly and so cheaply. 

TRUST US WITH YOUR NEXT ORDER. 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. OF CANADA, Limited 

TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

• (18) 




Only a Cent's Worth 

of gasoline is required to produce sufficient heat to do 
four hours' ironing-. Tell that to your women custom- 
ers as you point to 

The Ideal Self-Heating 
Sad Iron 

Tell them that it does away with going back and 
forth between stove and ironing board ; that its com- 
bustion is odorless and perfect, that its heat is increased 
or decreased at will, and you'll be surprised at the 
string of customers you'll have after One sale ! 

Write us or your jobber. 

Ideal Sad Iron Mfg. Co., Dept. B. 

Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. 



A STRONG SERVICEABLE LADDER 

There is no line on the 
market so suited for. hard 
wear and so certain to 
give satisfactory service 
as the 

FAULTLESS 
LADDER 

It is made from 
clean, kiln-dried, 
short leaf yellow 
pine, and equipped 
with the "Faultless 
Lock." A bolt un- 
der each step and a 
galvanized steel 

plate on the ends 
of every bolt clamp- 
ed tightly to the 
sides, eliminates all 
chance of spreading. 

Made 4 to 10 feet high and extra heavy 
10 to 16 feet. 

A Line that can be Safely Recommended 
Write for Catalogue "B" 

The Stratford Mfg. Co., Limited 

STRATFORD - CANADA 




29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ASK US WHY 

If you want to know more about "STANDARD" 

DOUBLE ACTING 



■ 

■ 

\V3 


1 






SPRING FLOOR 
HINGES, let us tell you a few dealers, the LARGEST 
and BEST, who believe in keeping UP-TO-DATE and 
are pushing the "STANDARD" line. 

THE STANDARD MFG. CO., Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A. 




" BAILEY " IRON SPOKE SHAVES Nos. 51 to 65 are superior in 
tyle and finish to any on the market. 

STANLEY RAZOR EDGE SPOKE SHAVES Noa. 72 to 85 are so 
called from the shape of the Cutter, which is Hollow Ground, giving a 
keen cutting edge. The adjustable front can be moved up or down and 
s coarse or fine shaving can be cut. 

The STANLEY UNIVERSAL SPOKE SHAVE No. 67 has both 
Handles detachable ao that either of them can be screwed into the socket 
an the top of the stock, thus allowing the Spoke Shave to be worked 
onto the corners, or panels, as no other spoke shave can do. They aie 
supplied with both a straight and curved bcrttom. 



COPYRIGHTED 



THE STANLEY 



"New Britain.Conn.U.SA. 



i r 



WIRE BALE TIES 



Other Specialties we 
make are 

Annealed Wire 

specially soft 
and pliable. 

WIRE NAILS 

Perfect heads 
and points. 
Full weight. 



For Baling Hay, our Wire, made, 
all the time, from the finest qual- 
ity Bessemer Rods, will give the 

most complete satisfaction. It will be found at least 10 per cent. 

stronger than any other Baling Wire on the market. Better send 

along an order. There is real satisfaction and profit in handling 

this well-known line. Get our prices. 

THE LAIDLAW BALE -TIE CO., Limited, Hamilton, Ontario 

GEO. W. LAIDLAW. Vancouver. B.C. HARRY F. MOULDEN. Winnipeg. Man. 



PLIERS :: SHOVELS :: LOCKS 

Mr. Buyer: — We can give you immediate shipments in these lines. Our stock 
is complete and our lines the very best. We know our price will interest you. 



SOLE AGENTS FOR THE CELEBRATED 



Lindstrom Swedish Pliers and Geo. Wolfe & Son's Shovels 



WRITE FOR CATALOGS. 



WHOLESALE ONLY. 



Schuchardt & Schutte, 307 Goristine Bldg., Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Not an Enterprise 
for the "Quitter " 

"If there is one enterprise on earth," says John 
Wanamaker, "that a 'quitter' should leave 
severely alone, it is advertising. To make 
a success of advertising one musT: be prepared 
to slick like a barnacle on a boat's bottom. 

" He musl know before he begins it that 
he must spend money — lots of it. 

" Somebody must tell him that he cannot 
hope to reap results commensurate with his 
expenditure early in the game. 

" Advertising does not jerk ; it pulls. It 
begins very gently at first, but the pull is steady. 
It increases day by day and year by year, 
until it exerts an irresistible power." 



WE MAKE 



CORRUGATED IRON 

STRAIGHT OR CURVED 



Every Sheet Absolutely Uniform 



Corrugated and plain round 
conductor pipe, all styles of 
Eavetrough, Elbows, Valleys, 
Ridge Roll, Skylights and 
Ventilators. :: :: :: :: 



Get our Prices for Galvanized Iron Sheets 



Wheeler & Bain 

THE QUICK SHIPPERS 
TORONTO CANADA 



A SUMMER 
PROFIT BOOSTER 



The fact that many retailers decrease 
their efforts during July and August 
gives all the more opportunity to the 
energetic ones who put on a little extra 
steam, during the hot weather, in an en- 
deavor to corral more business. 

For a large and very important con- 
stituency, "AMPHIBIA" Leather Belt- 
ing offers a splendid opportunity for the 
dealer to secure immediate orders, and 
introduce himself to a nice prospective 
trade. 

The most obvious prospects for this 
class of business are the manufacturers, 
and there is scarcely a town or village, 




especially in Central and Eastern Can- 
ada, that has not a manufacturing plant. 
Every plant demands an economical and 
reliable belting. We have it. 

"AMPHIBIA" WATERPKOOF BELTING 
could be used under water without harming 
it in any way. 

"AMPHIBIA" Heavy Single is made for extra 
heavy work, from very thick leather. 
"AMPHIBIA" Light Double will take moder- 
ate power over small pulleys. 
"AMPHIBIA" HEAVY DOUBLE is the giant 
belt intended for heavy mill work. 
"AMPHIBIA" Planer for the particular work 
on wood planers. 

"AMPHIBIA" Special Laundry for the wash 
wheels. 

Write at once. 



Sadler & Haworth 

ESTABLISHED 1876 

MONTREAL. 511 William St. TORONTO, ?7 Melinda St. 

ST. JOHN. N.B., 89 Prince William St. 

WINNIPEG, 244 Princess St. 

VANCOUVER. B.C.. 217 Columbia Ave. 



81 



II A K I) WARE AND METAL 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

Are showing at the Winnipeg Exhibition a splendid line of goods of their manufacture, 
including : — 

Jewel Stoves and Ranges, 

Jewel Gas Stoves, 

Jewel Warm Air Furnaces, 

Imperial Standard Scales, 

Champion Jewel Scales, 
Curry Combs and Hard-ware Specialties. 

This will be a large and striking exhibit, well worth seeing. 

The new warehouse of this company at 130 James Avenue, Winnipeg, is now completed 
and occupied. A large stock of goods on hand. Western merchants would find fit to their 
advantage to call. Mr. Lionel Haney, Manager, will be delighted to meet all who come and 
give them a hearty welcome. 

The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

Head Office and Factory, Hamilton, Ont. 
Branch Warehouse and Office, - - 130 James Avenue, Winnipeg 



You Can Add $20.00 Monthly 

to Your Income 

IF YOU WILL ACT AS MACLEAN'S SPARE 
TIME REPRESENTATIVE IN YOUR TOWN 

No matter what you do now, you can add this snug sum to your income during your 
spare hours, without interfering with your regular work. 

It is both easy and pleasant to earn this big money. 

"We will tell you who to see, what to say, and how to get the orders. You can easily 
add from $5 to $50 to your monthly income. Hundreds of others are doing it — so can you. 

You will act as circulation representative of the fourteen publications of the MacLean 
Publishing Company. Our papers are well established, and easy to sell. 

Send for our plan now. Write a letter, or a post card will do. it will bring you, by 
return mail, complete particulars. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, ;™ ™™o 



32 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Leaders in Dry Cells 

COLUMBIA 

There can be only one leader in any given line. That leadership must 
be obtained and recognized on account of superior qualities proven in 
d service. 

On this basis Columbia has won the distinction of having the longest 
life, being the lowest in cost in the end, and giving the maximum of 
good service. 

It is made of tested material, and only skilled men and highly special- 
ized machinery put the ingredieijts together. 

To make Columbia of greatest service to our customers we have made 
it from two formulas that produce somewhat different results. 
COLUMBIA is a light drain cell for all forms of intermittent work — 
bells, telephones, signals, self winding clocks, electrical toys, wireless 

telegraph outfits, and numerous other things 

Its chief qualities are long shelf life, uniformity of service, and low cost when compared with the length of 

its life. 

COLUMBIA IGNITOR is somewhat different. It is a strong current, quick recuperating cell for all forms 

of motor ignition — automobiles, motor boats, gas and gasoline engines, motor cycles, aeroplanes. 

When once used these will be always used. For sale by all electrical dealers. 

Address H.M.— 11 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Ltd. - Toronto, Ont. 

NOTE— Our New Factory at Toronto is thoroughly prepared to make quick shipments 
of fresh cells in any quantity. 




Palmer's Arawana and Monarch Hammocks 




A standardized line of Couch Hammocks, easily dismem- 
bered and permitting of partial replacement. 

The original, largest and best equipped Hammock Plant 
in the country. 

Send for catalog of Arawana and Couch Hammocks, 
illustrated in colors. 



UTOPIA ROYAL COUCH HAMMOCK 



pi 

TVPECS 
ARAWAtfA 
COUCH 



Also manufacturers of Mosquito Canopies, Nettings, 
Crinoline Linings, Horse-fly and Minnow Net- 
tings, and Window Screen Cloth. Dyeing, 
Sheer and Swiss Finishing. 

The I. E. PALMER CO., 

Middletown, Connecticut. New York Office : 55 Worth St. 
Canadian R. preventative : 

R. N. SCOTT, 200 McGill Street, Montreal, Que. 




WStW/t^^T^ 



33 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Dominion Ammunition 

Hits Hard and Hills 





Your customer looks for this TRADE MARK on DOMINION attractively 
labelled boxes. 

Your profit is best on DOMINION. Costs your customer one-third less 
than imported. 

PRICE and QUALITY will satisfy old customers and bring you new trade. 

Reliable ammunition for all makes of Revolvers, Rifles and Shot Guns. 



Dominion 
Cartridge 

Co., Ltd. 
Montreal, Canada 



REMINGTON 

UMC 



T »40t M^ 



RIFLE AND PISTOL 
CARTRIDGES 

For One-Shot Rills 




For small game, big game, target or protection in any make of 
gun under all weather conditions. 

The uniform ignition due to the perfection of the famous 
Remington-UMC primer, makes for sure fire, accuracy and 
penetration. 

In Remington-UMC big game cartridges, perfect combustion, accurate gauging, guarantee 
uniform flight in long range shots. 

Order now through your jobber. 

Our extensive advertising insures your sales. 

/^em/ngjo/t-UAfC the perfect shooting combination 

Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 

299 Broadway, - - - New York City 



34 



Midsummer Methods in Sporting Goods Department 

Firms Are Advertising Camping Supplies — A Splendid Opportunity for Trade 
in Tents, Stoves, Hammocks, Etc., for Use in Summer Outings — The Bicycle 
and its Place in the Hardware Store — Christie Bros. Sell a Large Number 
From Samples. 



The trade in sporting goods can be 
counted upon to remain consistent right 
through the summer season. There will 
be a steady demand for baseball sup- 
plies, lacrosse goods, anglers' accessories, 
etc., until autumn arrives, when the de- 
mand will veer to football supplies. Be- 
ginning, then, with the advent of spring 
and continuing right through until the 
time arrives when the air is too chilly for 
field sports, there is a steady trade to 
cater to. 

The sporting goods business is found 
to be highly satisfactory from the stand- 
point of the dealer. The average sports- 
man is an enthusiast of the first water. 
He will buy what he needs for sport 
with less hesitation than he might show 
if it were a question of the purchase of 
some of the mere necessities of life. 
The sportsman is harder to please than 
the average customer, however. He de- 
mands goods that suit him — and he al- 
ways knows what he wants. Further, 
he prefers to be waited upon by a clerk 
who knows something about the goods 
he is selling. The clerk who can dis- 
course learnedly on the relative merits 
of different flies and rods, and can ad- 
vise in the selection of a tennis racket 
or a baseball "decker" will sell con- 
siderably more than the salesman who 
knows less about such things than the 
purchaser. 

Many hardware dealers have found it 
highly profitable to place their sporting 
goods department in charge of a man 
closely connected with local athletic 
clubs and circles. His connection in- 
sures the store a large share of the busi- 
ness done in all sporting lines. 

Camping Supplies. 
There is a splendid opportunity at the 
present time to push the sale of camp- 
ing supplies. The hot weather is driv- 
ing people to live in the open. They 



are deserting their homes in the city 
and searching out quiet, cool spots in 
the country where they can pitch tents 
and spend the time in delightful gyp- 
syesque fashion. Before going camp- 
ing, however, people need certain sup- 
plies. In the first place, they need 
tents and tent stoves. A very primitive 
type of stove will do, but it is impossible 
to get along without some means of 
cooking meals, for the camp appetite is 
proverbially hearty. Cooking utensils 
are also needed — pots, pans, kettles, 
knives and forks. Few people care to 
take their regular household goods to 
camp, preferring to lay in a stock of 
cheap articles to be used only for camp- 
ing purposes. 

This means a lot of business for the 
hardwareman, if he takes any steps to 
secure a share of it. A number of firms 
are pursuing energetic campaigns along 
this line at the present time, among 
them being James S. Neill & Sons, 
Fredericton, KB. Neill & Sons have 
been advertising camping supplies for 
the last fortnight, using liberal space 
in the Fredericton daily papers. In 
addition to the lines mentioned, they ad- 
vertise fishing tackle, lanterns and ham- 
mocks, all of which are in the nature of 
necessities at camp. 

Advertise Picnic Baskets. 

At the other extremity of the Domin- 
ion, the Drake Hardware Co., of Vic- 
toria, are advertising picnic baskets. 
The summer picnic, despite its oft pic- 
tured discomforts and disadvantages, is 
an established institution. People will 
go picnicing, as long as there is any 
place to go to. Baskets to contain the 
store of good things which constitute 
the better part by far of every picnic 
are therefore much in demand. The 
Drake Hardware Co. say in their ad : 
"Picnic Baskets are greatly in request 
at the present time. Kindly remember 
we make a specialty of these and carry 
the good kind, useful for picnicing, 
at home, or to take with you when trav- 
eling on a tourist car." They advertise 

35 



two kinds and four sizes, ranging in 
price from 50 cents to 90 cents. 

Struck the Right Moment. 

A point to be considered is that peo- 
ple very frequently do not realize just 
what they need until they go camping. 
After a few days spent in experimenting 
with camp fires, they are only too pleas- 
ed to invest in a small wood stove. A 
case is recalled where a dealer, realizing 
this fact, worked up a splendid business 
by sending circular letters to all parties 
camping within a radius of a few miles 
of the city. 

A Bicycle Department. 

Fewer hardwaremen handle bicycles 
now than during the "biking craze" of 
twelve years ago and yet that branch of 
trade, as it stands to-day, is more satis- 
factory to handle than it was then. It 
is not necessary to carry a large stock; 
in fact, many hardware dealers sell 
solely from samples. Purchasers are 
not as hard to please, their desire being 
to secure a good, serviceable bicycle at 
a fair price. 

Christie Bros., of Owen Sound, have 
handled bicycles for years and have 
found that they constitute a paying de- 
partment. They sell entirely from sam- 
ple and are not therefore hampered 
with a large stock. The wheels that they 
do carry are always prominently dis- 
played. Recently, the writer paid a visit 
to OAven Sound and found one window- 
in Christie Bros.' store given up to a 
very attractive bicycle display. "We 
have a good business in bicycles," he 
was informed, "and it involves little or 
no work on our part. We do not carry a 
large stock and do not attempt to do re- 
pair work. Practically all we find neces- 
sary is to advertise our goods and ar- 
range window displays. We sell quite 
a number of wheels each year from sam- 
ple." 

The bicycle affords a good opportun- 
ity for hardware dealers at the present 
time. The success achieved by this one 
firm is not in any sense unique. The 
same has been done elsewhere and can 
be done by any other dealer who takes 
up the business in the proper way. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hot Weather Stimulated Demand in Many Lines 

Hardwarenien Were Kept Busy Supplying Screens, Garden 
Hose, Refrigerators, Hammocks, etc. — A Record Sale of Elec- 
tric Fans — General Business Suffered. 



manner. 


l .1 


us 


demonsl 


rule 


their 


i ( rits at 


tl e 


store, 


or write 


for 


book- 



Hardware dealers have probably less 
reason to complain of the weather than 
other merchants. True, business has 
fallen off since Old Probs started on 
the rampage. In some lines, retail busi- 
ness has been more or less at a complete 
standstill. It has been too hot for shop- 
ping. People have preferred to lounge 
around the house in vain efforts to keep 
cool, rather than to risk trips to the 
mercantile sections. To counter-balance 
this, the torrid weather- has created a 
large demand for certain lines of goods 
which are handled exclusively by the 
hai'dwareman. 

Garden hose, for instance, has been 
one of the "best sellers" during the 
past week. The extreme heat made 
sprinkling more or less of a necessity. 
Much relief could be secured by soak- 
ing the sun-baked walls of the houses 
and the sadly wilted grass and gardens 
with water. People who had never used 
garden hose before found themselves 
hurrying to hardware stores on Mon- 
day to lay in a supply. In Toronto, 
where the heat records of half a cen- 
tury were badly smashed, the drain on 
the water supply became so heavy that 
the civic authorities had to forbid grass 
watering on pain of severe penalties. 
People seemed, however, to fear the au- 
thorities less than they did the sun, for 
they went on buying hose and using the 
city water on a lavish scale. The Rus- 
sill Hardware Co. report a record-break- 
ing sale of hose. "Usually the demand 
has been pretty well satisfied by this 
time," they state, "but this week, the 
orders came so thick and fast that we 
could hardly satisfy them." 

Screen Doors Sold Well. 
The same applied to screen doors and 
•window screens. Although sales of such 
goods are usually made during June, the 
hot weather brought a relapse in the de- 
mand. Hardware stores were soon de- 
pleted. "I was sold right out by Tues- 
day morning," declares one western On- 
tario dealer. "People were buying 
screens for every door and window in 
the house, in the hope of securing every- 
thing in the way of a breeze that was 
going. Consequently, we had requests 
for some most unusual sizes. One man 
asked for a screen six feet by ten feet — 
he wanted it for a store window." 

Record Sale of Fans. 

The extreme limit to which the heat 

attained led people to make purchases 

which in cooler moments they would 

probably have considered as unwarrant- 



ed extravagances. The electric fan be- 
came a much-sought article. Few homes 
prior to the outbreak could be found 
which boasted a fan, but now there are 
countless houses in Toronto thus equip- 
ped. 

Last week one of the windows in the 
retail store of Rice Lewis & Son, To- 
ronto, was given up to a display of fans. 
This doubtless served to direct a large 
share of the business their way. Cer- 
tainly Rice Lewis & Son did a record 
business on Monday and Tuesday. "We 
sold more fans than ever before," ex- 
plained the manager. "People came in 
to buy fans for their homes, prepared 
to secure comfort by that means, no 
matter what the cost might be. Al- 
though we sold a great many for offices, 
the majority of the orders were for pri- 
vate homes." 

One dealer reports that he received 
an order from one man for a fan for his 
dining room and one for each bedroom 
in the house. 

Advertised Irons. 

The sale of other electrical goods was 
accelerated as a result of the weather 
conditions. Timely advertisements were 
inserted by a number of firms, with best 
results. The Bond Hardware Co., of 
Guelph, advertised electric irons, and, it 
is understood, had a large sale as a re- 
sult. Their ad. was written to appeal 
directly to the housewife who desires 
to carry out her duties as comfortably 
as possible on warm days. 

Refrigerator Sales. 

Although the refrigerator season pro- 
per has been over for some little time, 
the heat wave brought the demand back, 
bigger and more insistent than ever. 
People who had depended on their cellars 
for storage of food found this method 
entirely inadequate. There was, conse- 
quently, a big sale of refrigerators. Rice 
Lewis & Son made a special effort to 
attract trade in this line, advertising ef- 
fectively in the Toronto papers each 
day of the crisis. "Buy now refrigera- 
tors 'that breathe coolness and save you 
ice,' " read their advertisement. "The 
present hot spell has emphasized the im- 
portant part refrigerators play during 
the summer months. Such heat as we 
are now having will tend to taint so 
many articles of diet unless kept in re- 
frigerators of a strictly sanitary nature. 
Ours are proved and recommended by 
the medical profession in an emphatic 



' calera report a number of curious 
and unusual requests. One man order- 
ed a rti'rigerator by telephone and in- 
sisted OD immediate delivery. "Send 
it up inside of ten minutes," he said. 
His house proved to be a good half-hour 
drive from the store. 

A Run on Hammocks. 

The habit of sleeping outside became 
pretty general during the hot nights. As 
a result, hammocks were in heavy de- 
mand. One Toronto dealer states that 
he sold no less than a dozen hammocks 
in twenty-four hours, despite the fact 
that he had only found customers for 
three during the whole season previous 
to that. 

Tents were also in demand. Although 
not handled in all hardware stores, some 
dealers carry them, and they managed 
to dispose of quite a number to heat- 
plagued residents of ' ' Torrid Toronto. ' ' 

Rented Out Tents. 

A western Ontario dealer is reported 
to have done a brisk business by rent- 
ing tents for the week. Many people 
availed themselves of this opportunity 
to "sleep out" at a comparatively small 
cost. 

Thermometers Sold Well. 

It was not only the necessities which 
were in demand. There was a big run 
on thermometers. People wanted to be 
in a position to tell just how miserable 
they really were. Dealers in all parts 
report that they sold more thermometers 
than ever before. 

And so, taking it all around, the hai'd- 
wareman did not suffer as much as mer- 
chants in other lines. What he lost in 
regular trade, he made up in the heavy 
run on the lines mentioned. What trade 
resulted from the warm spell was shared 
largely by the ice cream vendor and the 
hardware dealer. 



NEW SCHOOL WITH NOVEL 
EQUIPMENT. 

Chatham, Ont.- — J. L. Wilson & Son, 
architects, of this city, are preparing 
plans and specifications for a new $20,- 
000 school for the Chatham board of 
education. In addition to the usual 
equipment, the building may include 
some new features, such as a vacuum 
cleaning system and fan system of ven- 
tilation. 

N. M. Moore, who has for some 
months been conducting a tinware busi- 
ness on Fifth Street North, is closing 
out his stock. His future intentions have 
not yet been announced. 



HARDWA k K AND METAL 



Buying Public are Demanding Better Service 

Keep Business at Home by Improving Store Methods — Organ- 
ization of Merchants Means Better Conditions — Employ Best 
Clerks and Encourage Them in Self-improvement. 

By M. Moyer, Treasurer Retail Merchants' Association of Canada. 



The fact becomes more apparent every 
day that it is not cheap selling that 
draws trade, but up-to-date service, and 
if the consuming public have to send 
away from their own towns to get the 
service they approve of, then there is 
something wrong with the methods oi 
store keeping. There is perhaps nothing 
we have in the country which is so slow 
to move out of its old rut as store 
keeping, and in consequence of this, the 
country is losing one of its best assets. 
The men who distribute the products 
and bring within easy reach things the 
people need and desire to have, are an 
important factor in all communities, and 
if these fail to do the w T ork in the best 
possible manner then the people have 
reason to complain, and if they are forc- 
ed to seek other places to do their buy- 
ing the merchants are largely to blame. 
The old time idea still prevails in the 
minds of a good many merchants that 
they cannot be on friendly terms with 
other who are in the same line of trade 
and instead of working together to im- 
prove the commercial machinery they 
are trying to throw obstacles in the way 
of each other, and while they are doing 
this their customers are deserting them. 

Bitter Rivalry Results in Poorer Service. 

The time was, when customers thought. 
such a state of affairs was necessity, 
that bitter rivalry was their opportun- 
ity to get things cheaper, but they have 
grown out of that fallacy, and are de- 
manding a more dignified service. 

Some of the merchants are realizing 
this, and are improving their methods, 
but others are not, and until they all 
agree to conform with popular, up-to- 
date business ideas, their services, as 
distributors, are inadequate and not sa- 
tisfactory. While all other lines of ac- 
tivities have found great help and ad- 
vantage in united effort, there are still 
a great many so called merchants, who 
are hanging on what they have got, and 
are opposed to anything and everything 
which is in advance of their own old 
stick-in-the-mud notions. 

Knocking Merchants' Organizations. 

There are even cases where some of 
the merchants in a towm organized a re- 
tail merchants' association in order to 
improve conditions, and those who did 
not join, led their customers to believe 
that it was a combine to raise the 
prices of goods, and for that reason 
they did not join them. Tactics of this 
kind are common among merchants and 
as long as they don't rise to a higher 



level, or weed out the old fossils the 
country will sutler for want of up-to- 
date business men. 

Manufacturers and producers of all 
kinds are constantly on the alert for im- 
proved machinery at any cost, in order 
to produce, more, better ana cheaper 
goods, but the merchants are not fol- 
lowing this rule and tor that reason 
they are not getting the trade that 
rightfully belongs to them, and they are 
not rendering the service the people are 
entitled to. 

While this machinery consists princi- 
pally of men, they require the best, but 
like machinery, in order to get satisfac- 
tory results they must be properly oiled 
and have careful attention. In this re- 
spect the clerk does not get the same 
chance as a machine. If a machine does 
not work perfectly, it is helped and ad- 
justed until it does perfect work. A 
clerk would be more than human if he 
could give the best that is in him with- 
out the oil of encouragement and ap- 
preciation. In some places, where the 
employers understand how to treat their 
clerks, they do their work so perfectly 
that people take a real pleasure in buy- 
ing from them, and consequently will get 
their trade. 

Clerks Should Aim at Increased Knowl- 
edge. 

As soon as a clerk thinks he knows it 
all, then he has to start to learn how 
little he knows. What he knows to-day 
is not enough for him to know to-mor- 
row. Salesmanship like music requires 
constant intelligent practice. A word, a 
look, or a simple act, may make or lose 
a customer which may mean hundreds of 
dollars to the store. Many a manufac- 
turer throws out a machine which has 
cost him thousands of dollars and re- 
places it with a better one, and he finds 
that it pays to do it. 

Would it not be equally wise on the 
part of the merchant to demand a high- 
er type of a machine in the shape of 
better clerks. Improved machines are 
invented and manufactured, because it is 
a known fact that there is a constant 
demand for better machines, for which 
the manufacturing world is willing to 
pay. If the commercial world were will- 
ing to pay for better clerks, surely the 
service could be so much improved that 
it would meet the demands of the peo- 
ple, and business would follow its na- 
tural channel. Better clerks and business 
improvements can only result from unit- 
ed effort which will be my next subject. 
37 



HANDLING CEMENT IN THE HARD 
WARE STORE. 

The handling of cement is quite a 
figure in the business of many retail 
hardware men throughout the Domin- 
ion. A. Leger of Lacroix & Leger, 
Mount Royal Ave., Montreal, stated to 
a representative of Hardware and 
Metal that their trade in cement was 
quite appreciable. They are located in 
a district that is being rapidly built 
up and are also approximate to a simi- 
lar field in the north central part of 
the city. "One must follow the build- 
ing operations," stated Mr. Leger, and, 
when you have made his acquaintance 
you understand how it came about that 
his fellow hardwaremen selected him 
again as the president of their associa- 
tion. "Close relation with prominent 
builders is a decided asset for it then 
becomes an easier matter to follow 
what is being done and what work the 
future is likely to bring." 

Cement is not like the ordinary ar- 
ticle in the hardwareman's stock. The 
demand for the most part is not in 
small lots. There is a certain trade of 
that character but the real business 
must be in the large sized parcels. 
Building up such a trade depends most- 
ly upon opportunity and the realization 
of it. There is no set of rules to fol- 
low. One man may see the opening in 
his town and may be in other respects 
well adapted for just that trade. His 
acquaintance with the building con- 
tractors may include practically all 
those in his town and so on. The 
handling of cement presents no difficul- 
ties once the business is assured. 

Keep in Close Touch. 
As president of the hardware branch 
of the R.M.A., Mr. Leger has devoted 
a great deal of his attention to the 
consideration of profits and has also 
endeavored to have the dealers gener- 
erally understand that straight business 
methods should be followed. By that 
is meant the avoiding of any tendency 
to cut prices. In this work he has had 
assistance and he believes that condi- 
tions among the trade have in recent 
years shown considerable improvement. 
In some lines there may still be some 
shading of prices but it is limited and 
does not call for much attention. 

Mr. Leger on Profits. 
Of course there are some lines which 
do not bring as much profit as they 
should. In fact the discrepancy in this 
direction has to be made up in some 
other. Custom is probably responsible 
for the falling off in some prices. It is 
not easy to get away from prices that 
have been so and so for years accord- 
ing to a certain scale 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN ■ President 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circulate in the Province! 
of British Columbia. Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba. Ontario, Que- 
bec, Nova Scotia. New Brunswick, P.E. Island and Newfoundland 

CABLE ADDRESSES 

CANADA : Macpubco. Toronto. ENGLAND : Atabek. London. Ens;. 

OFFICES 

Montreal 701-702 Eastern Townships Bank Building. Phone Main 12SS 

Toronto - - - 143-149 University Avenue- Phone Main 7324 

Winnipeg; - - - 34 Royal Bank Building- Phone Garry 2313 

Vancouver, B.C H. Hodgson, 11 Hartney Chambers 

London. Eng. • E. J Dodd. 88 Fleet Street. E.C. Phone Central 12960 
New York - R. B. Huestis. 115 Broadway. N.Y. Phone 2282 Cortlandt 
France - - John F.Jones 4* Co. . 31bis Faubourg Montmartre. Paris 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada and United States, $2: Great Britain. 8s. 6d.; elsewhere, 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 



VACATIONS AS AN INVESTMENT. 

It is conceded by nearly everybody that an annual 
two weeks' change of scene is essential to keep a busi- 
ness man in proper condition to do business. If this 
principle has been even partially accepted before, it must 
have gained many a convert during the past couple of 
weeks, when the terrific heat wave seems to have sapped 
the vitality of everyone who has had to endure it. 

Anyone who notices the jaded appearance of employ- 
ers and clerks alike, during this heated term, will be 
ready to admit that it will take a long spell of cool 
weather under the ordinary conditions of work for them 
to regain their snap and vigor On the other hand, a 
couple of weeks spent in the country, among the moun- 
tains, or on the shores of a lake, will put them in such 
shape that they will take up their work more heartily 
than ever, upon their return to the store. 

From the most sordid money standpoint, it is advis- 
able for everyone connected with the store to partici- 
pate in the summer vacation. The employer should cer- 
tainly take a respite from work, and make it just as 
lengthy as he possibly can. If he wishes to retain the 
capacity for managing his store as long as possible, and 
to avoid the necessity of a retirement through ill health, 
he must not fail to take advantage of the natural slack- 
ness of trade, to enjoy from two weeks to two months of 
good fresh air, free from dust and smoke. The longer a 
merchant is able to remain in harness, the more oppor- 
tunity he will have to make money, and, as his summer 
vacation will unquestionably add to his years of useful- 
ness, it should prove the best kind of an investment for 
him. 

The vacations he allows his clerks will also redound to 
his profit. A tired, perspiring clerk cannot be expected 
to make as much money for his employer as the one who 
has been refreshed and invigorated by a pleasant vaca- 
tion, which he can recall to mind for months to come. 



HARDWARE AND THE WEATHER. 

It is a satisfactory feature of the trade that no 
change of the weather, no turn of the season, can fail to 
prove itself of some benefit to hardware dealers. For in- 
stance, the unprecedented warm spell of the past week, 
which has almost paralyzed trade in some directions, 
brought in its wake a singularly brisk demand for many 
hardware articles, the activity thus created almost coun- 
terbalancing the inevitable falling off in regular business. 
People found that they needed refrigerators, screen doors, 
garden hose, electric fans and kindred articles and to the 



hardware store they went to get them. In some lines, a 
record business was done. In other branches of trade, 
merchants report a singular dullness, alleviated in no 
way by demand for special goods. It was the hardware- 
man's good fortune to handle the very articles needed in 
case of a heat crisis. 

In winter time the demand sets to stoves, weather- 
strips, blankets, etc., and again the hardwareman is to 
the fore. Every atmospheric change brings with it a 
new demand and thei hardware business is, therefore, of a 
thorough all-year-around description. A protracted spell 
of severe weather, no matter of what description, cannot 
hurt the trade as severely as it affects other lines of com- 
mercial enterprise. 

CAUSE OF SLOW COLLECTIONS. 

It is reported that collections in Ontario are not en- 
tirely satisfactory at the present time. This condition is 
particularly true of the rural sections and is probably 
due to the fact that the farmer has reached the end of 
his ready cash and is now traveling on credit until the 
harvesting is over. It is undeniably true, however, that 
the primary cause could be traced farther back than the 
necessity of carrying farmer customers over the harvest- 
ing. It lies in the fact that too many dealers are defi- 
cient in looking after their own collections. Accustomed 
to wait themselves, they make the wholesaler and the 
jobber wait in turn. 

That this is the root of the whole trouble is estab- 
lished by the fact that it is the same men, year after 
year, who fall behind. The paper turned back is gener- 
ally decorated with familiar names. These men are 
chronically slow in meeting financial obligations and it 
is doubtful if they will ever get their business on a basis 
where they will not have to slave and scrape to meet 
notes. 

Here is an incident which explains why some retail 
dealers never get their heads above water. A Toronto 
wholesaler had occasion, some time ago, to purchase 
goods at the store of an old hardwareman. Some weeks 
passed and no bill was presented. Finally, the whole- 
saler happened to meet the dealer. "I have not received 
a bill yet," he reminded the latter. "Don't treat me any 
different from any other customer; send in your bill and 
I'll send you a cheque." "I am not treating you differ- 
ent," was the reply. "Didn't know you owed me any- 
thing. You see, I haven't time to bother much with the 
books, so a man comes in twice a year and fixes them up 
for me. He looks. after the accounts." This may sound 
incredible to merchants who run their affairs on a 
business basis. The wholesaler was hardly inclined to 
believe that anyone could be so slack, but sure enough, 
it was not until five months after that the bill arrived. 

Is it any wonder that some men fail to make a success 
of business? It is impossible to get along and prosper if 
collections are not made promptly and thoroughly. Fur- 
thermore, the dealer who neglects to go after the money 
due him will find it exceedingly difficult to make pay- 
ments on his own indebtedness. 

It is expected that the slowness now experienced in 
making collections will be dissipated after the harvesting 
is over. It will never be thoroughly removed, however, 
until dealers, as a body, pay more attention to their own 
collecting. 



PUNCTUALITY. 

A hardwareman asked a representative of Hardware 
and Metal, the other day, why this paper often ridiculed 
the clerk, but never the proprietor. This dealer said that 



38 



II A K I) W A H K ANU M KT A I. 



he thought that it would do the hardwaremen good to 
give them a memory jogger once in a while, and, just to 
please him, we are going to make a few remarks on the 
subject of punctuality. 

This is one of the hardwareman's most vulnerable 
points. At the Peterboro Convention, last February, it 
is doubtful if a single session commenced even approx- 
imately on time. One of the evening meetings was de- 
layed so long that a dealer remarked to the writer: 
"It's a shame to think what some of these dealers would 
do to their clerks if they came down to work as late as 
the dealers themselves come to these meetings." 

In a certain Western Ontario town, where the Alder- 
men, Board of Trade members, and other dignitaries are 
largely retail merchants, it has become customary to an- 
nounce 8 o'clock meetings for 7.30. By bitter experience, 
it has been learned that, unless this precaution were tak- 
en, it would be 8.30 before a quorum would assemble. In 
this town, to use the words of a local wag : "Punctual- 
ity Is the Thief of Time.," Any dealer who is a member 
of any official board should make it a point to be on 
hand promptly at the appointed hour. Minutes are money 
to the business man, and anyone who delays the opening 
of a meeting on time is causing a loss of time, comfort 
and money, to those who are punctual. 

There is another class of appointments which the 
average retailer does not consider necessary to be kept 
right to the minute. These are the appointments which 
he makes with traveling salesmen, to look over their 
samples at a certain hour. Many a salesman loses va- 
luable time in this way, when, in nine cases out of ten, 
the dealer could easily arrange his work so as to keep 
the appointment on time. 

Punctuality is the mark of the real business man. It 
not only saves time for all concerned, but is an ordinary 
courtesy which should never he overlooked in mercantile 
life. 



INTERESTING CLERKS IN PROFITS. 

It is strange how many good merchants are in the 
habit of judging their business primarily by the annual 
turnover. Hence, they are also prone to judge the value 
of their clerks by the gross volume of their sales. 

That this is a fallacious principle, will be readily 
recognized, if a little thought be given to the subject. It 
is not the business with a large turnover, but the one 
with a profitable turnover, which should give the mer- 
chant cause for congratulation. Many a business oper- 
ating on microscopic profits has a large turnover, and. 
on the other hand, not a few stores with a comparatively 
small total of sales, are netting their owners handsome 
profits. 

Of course, the making of profits depends very largely 
upon economical management, but the importance of 
training clerks to sell for profit must not be overlooked. 
Without this training, a clerk will naturally follow the 
line of least resistance, and sell those goods which are 
easiest to sell. 

Some merchants have already adopted methods by 
which their clerks know the net profit on their sales and 
are encouraged to sell the most profitable lines. This 
eventually results in giving the store a reputation for 
high-class goods, which usually carry the best profits, and 
in developing superior selling ability in the staff. 

One Ontario hardware store, by adopting a triple 
price-mark system, as recently described in these columns, 
has eliminated the tendency to cut prices below the 
profit mark, and developed a desire, on the part of the 
clerks, to make the maximum profit on their sales. 

Another plan adopted by a Montreal firm, is to share 
profits with the clerks, whose income is therefore de- 



pendent upon their making pi-ofitable sales. The total 
cost of each line in the store is accurately figured out, and 
the profits are shared, accordingly to a fixed schedule, on 
every sale made. A peculiar feature of this system is 
that the clerks are obliged to share losses as well as 
profits, so that when a clerk sells nails, he as well as the 
e.nployer, loses money on the transaction. Of course, a 
necessary part of this idea is that the correct proportion 
of the overhead expense should be charged to each line 
carried, and this requires a carefully worked out system 
of accounting. 

Neither of these plans may be universally applicable, 
but the general idea of interesting clerks in the store's 
profits is a good one, and is worth all the thought and 
ingenuity that the dealer can employ in working out a 
system that will suit his own needs. 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

The tinsmith's work is not the most desirable in wea- 
ther such as has been experienced during the past week. 

* • » 

It is reported that the recent hot spell has brought 
an increased demand for refrigerators and ice cream 
freezers. It's an ill wind, etc. 

* * * 

There is one hardwareman in Ontario who sends out 
his accounts twice a year regularly. He complains that 
people are "slow pay." Whose fault is it? 

If not supplied regularly with food, the body soon 
gives out. How long a tenure of life would you give a 
business conducted on the bi-yearly collection basis. 

* * * 

This hot weather suggests the possibility of making 
a run on thermometers. The average man loves to tell 
what the temperature was on his front veranda, as he 
compares notes with his business friends. 

The hardwareman who works all day and then every 
evening as well is adding an unnecessary load to the 
"white man's burden." The life of the retail dealer is 
arduous enough without adding to the length of the hours 

of service. 

* * • 

Several of the leading Toronto hardwaremen were ex- 
traordinarily busy during the record-breaking hot wave 
Their sales of hot weather specialties reached very large 
proportions. No further proof is required, that the well 
managed hardware store need fear no serious mid-sum- 
mer slump. 

* * * 

Old Sol has smiled indulgently, and warmly, on the 
hardwareman. His ardent efforts have resulted in a 
splendid sale of hammocks, tents, hose, electric fans and 
the other articles with which the sweltering population 
have sought to cope with the terrific heat. But is busi- 
ness at this price worth it ? 

* * » 

A dealer at Creemore took his tinsmiths three miles 
into the country to instal a furnace. As he had a lot 
of work to do at the store before leaving on a holiday 
trip the next day, he left his horse with the men, as 
soon as he got them started, and undertook to walk 
home. With the thermometer registering 103 in the 
shade, those hot country roads were not very comfort- 
able. "I laid down for a rest under every tree on the 
road, and I was all in when I reached the store," he 
said. 



39 



II A HI) W A H E AND M E T A L 



A Suggested Sporting Goods Display 

Idea Put Out by Manufacturing Firm to Help Their Dealers 
—How Lithographed Advertising Cards May be Used Effec- 
tively in Window. 



Stocking the dealer is no longer re- 
garded l>y progressive manufacturers as 
the final step in the creation of adequate 
distribution and in the maintenance and 
upbuilding of sales. To simply place 
goods on the shelves may have been the 
sum-total of progressive effort a decade 
agb. To-day it represents no more than a 
working basis. 

The dealer is no longer asked to de- 
pend solely upon his own efforts in the 
moving of his stock but receives the co- 
operation of a branch of the manufac- 
turers' selling organization, the sole 
purpose for the existence of which is to 
create sales for him. 

This year, the efforts of the Reming- 
ton Arms-Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 
in this direction are especially note- 
worthy. Always an extensive adver- 
tiser, this Company has not only ar- 
ranged its advertising schedule so that 
its dealers may reap the greatest pos- 
sible benefit from it, but it is backing 
up this sales-creative work in a manner 
that cannot fail to re-act to the mutual 
good. 

With the fact in mind that the dis- 
play window of a dealer proves a worth- 
while trade winner when made attrac- 
tive by original and artistic arrange- 
ment and decoration, this company is 
offering its dealers a window trim, a 
photograph of which is shown on this 
page, which combines unusual attrac- 
tiveness with distinct selling value. 

The trim in its entirety is calculated 
to not only immediately arrest the at- 
tention of the passerby, but to suggesl 
the pleasure of shooting, in a way that 
will create a want on t be part of the 
spectators, for the arms and ammuni- 
tion on sale. 

A particularly striking feature of the 
Eemington-U.M.C. window display is a 
lithograph in the shape of an enlarged 
steel-lined shell with a cut-out flying 
duck standing out in relief. At the top 
is the caption, "A Bird in Every Shell." 

Another interesting feature that at- 
tracts marked attention is a reproduc- 
tion of a target showing (lie remarka 1 le 
sere of 2.484 out of a possible 2,500 
made by Arthur Hubalek. Behind the 
bullet-punctured bull's eye, and plainly 
visible, is the Remington-U.M.C. trade 
mark. "The Trade Mark Behind the 
Record" is the happy phrase this dis- 
play contains. 

A further illustration of originality 
and effectiveness is the lithograph an- 
nouncing the world's record high aver- 



age of 97.75 per cent, for the year, made 
with Reniington-U.M.C. steel-lined shells 
by W. H. Heer. This lithograph, too, 
is in the form of a shell and shows the 
champion standing within. 

In many other ways the firm in ques- 
tion is co-operating with its dealers so 
that they may reap the benefit of in- 
creased profit through increased sales. 



RENTING INSTEAD OF LENDING. 

Stratford, Ont. — A new line of busi- 
ness for hardwaremen has been suggest- 
ed by one of the fraternity in a little 
talk. 

' ' I have been renting articles of hard- 
ware on a small scale lately," he re- 
marked, "and I find it is good business. 
It brings in some money, and it helps to 
put a stop on the borrowing fiend. 

"Formerly, people used to come in 
here to borrow all isorts of articles — 
particularly tools. It would be 'just for 
a minute,' but in many cases the minute 
ended only when, some weeks later, I 
sent a clerk to hunt up the missing 
article. 

"The climax came when a gentleman 
dropped in to borrow a rat trap. ' The 
house is just full of rats and mice,' he 



said. ' I just want it till I clear them 
out, and then I'll return it right away.' 

" 'See here,' I said, 'I'll rent you a 
trap,' and after 1 had shown him what 
a joke he had really attempted to per- 
petrate on me, he rented. He took a 
big cage trap, the kind that I usually 
sell for 75 cents, and was to pay 25 
cents for the use of it long enough to 
clear out the rats — two or three weeks 
— we finally agreed. At the end of that 
time 1 had my trap none the worse for 
wear, and 25 cents into the bargain. 

"I have tried the scheme out with a 
number of articles, and it seems to work 
fairly well. The usual way is to bill the 
article at its full value, and then to sti- 
pulate that, if the purchaser wants to 
return it, a rebate of a certain amount 
will be allowed. If the customer keeps 
the article, all right ; and if not, I get 
enough to pay for the depreciation 
several times over. This way, I don't 
have to send after articles, or keep 
track of the time they must be in, since 
it's up to the customer to return them if 
he wants his rebate. There are some 
lines of hardware with which the scheme 
could be worked out quite profitably, I 
think; and it might even pay to adver- 
tise it at certain seasons of the year. I 
fancy that, in the case of the rat trap 
referred to before, quite a bit of busi- 
ness could be done with chicken-owners 
during the brooding season. Anyway, 
it is better than lending without any 
consideration at all." 




Suggestion for Sporting Goods Window. 



Our Page for Hardware Clerks 



Stick to the Task in Hand 

You Can't Sell Hardware and Think of Frivolous Things at the 
Same Time — ' 'Dubness" the Result of Not Concentrating on the 
Important Thing of the Moment — Give Every Speck of Atten- 
tion to Each Customer. 

By Victor Lauriston. 



It didn't happen in a hardware store. 
Maybe such a thing could never hap- 
pen in a hardware store. And, may- 
be, again, it could. 

"It's certainly a splendid piece of 
goods," the salesman remarked. "No- 
tice the extra weight and the smooth 
surface. This check is all the go for 

winter wear, and " 

The lady beyond the counter stared 
queerly at him. And then she noticed 
that the clerk's face wore a far away 
look, and that his eyes were fixed on a 
distant part of the store. 

"Pardon me," she remarked gently, 

"but — that's the flowered piece of goods 

you're showing me. Here is the check." 

He had been sailing in the clouds, but 

he quickly tumbled to earth. 

We all hate extremes, and that inci- 
dent was extreme. But it flings a 
dazzling chunk of first-class radium 
light on the reason why a lot of clerks 
never become anything better than 
dubs. 

The dub's a useful article. He helps 
to fill in between times — he can hold a 
job till a genuine salesman comes 
along and secures the predestined place; 
and after the salesman's promoted, as 
he's bound to be, the dub can drift in 
again and fill the same place, till an- 
other sample of the real thing turns 
up. 

"Dubness"— that is, the quality of be- 
ting a dub — is often just another name 
for wool-gathering; and wool gathering 
signifies letting your mind go kiting 
away to the skies wheo you ought to 
be contentrating every whit of your 
attention on the task in hand. 

For you can't negotiate to advantage 
while your mind is meandering else- 
where—while your thoughts are loping 
back to last night's party, or explor- 
ing the dark veil of the future and con- 
juring up fram its shadows some scheme 
for meeting that tailor's bill which is 
going to hit you amidships next week. 
Nor can you sell or put your whole 
soul into selling when you're watching 
the passers-by upon the streets or fur- 



tively making eyes at the. cashier. 

Oh, I know all about those dull 
spells when the customer turns the ar- 
ticle over and over and over, and hems 
and haws about it, and says, in actions 
if not in words, that before buying 
he'd like to consult his wife. Then's 
the time that you would like to lean 
back and let your mind go kiting to 
other themes. It's pretty tedious wait- 
ing for the customer to make up his 
mind 

But that's just the time, of all times, 
when you ought to be on the job. For 
the hour of indecision is the hour in 
which the customer must be led to de- 
cide; and you are there to lead him. 
It's then that the chance word fitly 
spoken makes the article an apple of 
gold in the customer's eye and winds up 
by adding to your cash register's con- 
tents one or two pictures of silver. 
And it's by studying him in every word 
and act, by deftly questioning him, 



that you'll discover the chance word 
which will do the trick. 

So Concentrate yourself upon the 
single sale you have in hand. It's 
pleasant to meditate on a wide range of 
topics-^ut you can do that when you're 
not selling. It looks decidedly dashing 
for you to pause in the middle of a 
sale and wave your hand to a passer- 
by — but your customer mayn't be enam- 
ored of interruptions, and the "dash" 
of your act may stroke his fur the 
wrong way. 

In selling nothing counts like con- 
centration — rhe giving of every speck of 
your attention to the task in hand and 
the customer with whom you deal at the 
moment. Centre all your thoughts on 
these things, and let the rest of the 
world, for the nonce, drop quite out of 
your range of vision. 



BIG ORDER FOR RAILS. 

It is announced that the Canadian 
Northern Railway has just placed orders 
with the Dominion Steel Corporation and 
the Soo Company for 105,000 tons of 
rails. The tonnage represented in these 
orders alone will lay approximately 975 
miles. 




41 



Furtively Making Eyes at the Cashier. 



1 1 A K L) W ARI5 AND M E T A L 



Twenty Years Ago 

In the Canadian Hardware Trade 



Hardware Letter 
Box 



The following interesting items arc 
taken Prom Hardware and Metal, issue of 
July 11, 1891: 

"-Commercial (raveling by bicycle 
is the latest. A young gentleman 
rides a high-wheel roadster and car- 
ries a sample case, a rubber coat and 
other small articles. He is traveling 
for a Toronto house, and his route 
lies from Toronto, taking in all the 
i owns and villages to Sarnia. The 
bicycle is finding new fields of use- 
fulness every day. " 
Editor's Note. — The traveler who 
would now start out to cover the terri- 
tory between Toronto and Sarnia, on a 
high-wheeled bicycle, would undoubtedly 
create a sensation in every town along 
the line. If he succeeded in completing 
the trip he would be acclaimed a modern 
Hercules. A good many hardware 
travelers are now going over their routes 
in automobiles, and there are some retail 
liardwaremen who are making good use 
of the motor car. Stephens & Douglas, 
Chatham, Out., are using one for their 

country canvasser. 

* * * 

"Following the example of the 
law makers and law breakers at Ot- 
tawa, the employes of Harris, Son & 
Co., and Waterous Engine Works 
Co., of Brantford, took no holiday 
on Dominion Day, in consequence of 
the pressure of work." 
Editor's Note — Harris, Son & Co. are 
now the Braniford branch of the Massey- 
Harris Co., and Waterous Engine Works 
Co. are still among the leading industrial 

plants of Brantford. 

* * » 

"The Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, 
have taken out a permit to build a 
factory on Queen street, between 
Barton and York street." 
Editor's Note— The Ontario Tack Co. 
were taken over by the Canadian Screw 
Co., who later became merged into the 

Steel Co. of Canada. 

* * * 

"Mr. Peleg Howland, of H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co., Toronto, was 
married to Miss Smith, of Cheboy- 
gan, Mich., last week, and is away 
on a few weeks' trip on the Upper 

Lakes. ' ' 

* • • 

"W. R. Hobbs, of the Hobbs 
Hardware Co., London, has leased 
the residence known as Erie Bank, 
at Port Stanley, and his family has 
taken possession for the summer 
months." 



Razors. 

Leith Bros., Calgary. — "Could you let 
us know who are manufacturers of the 
Barrel make of razors?" 

This razor is made by a German linn, 
whose Canadian representatives are 
Greef-Bredt & Co., 62 Front W., Tor- 
onto. — Editor. 

Bluestone. 

Simmons Bros. — " Kindly advise us 
where we can purchase bluestone." 

Any paint and varnish jobbers can 
supply this article. — Editor. 

Furniture Journal. 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Gait, Out. — 
"Would you be good enough to advise 
us of a furniture journal issued in Can- 
ada?" 

Canadian Furniture and Upholstery 
Journal, Toronto. — Editor. 

Toledo Cooker. 

E. T. Wright & Co., Hamilton.— "Do 
you know who makes the Toledo Cook- 
er?" 

Toledo Cooker Co., Toledo, Ohio. — 

Editor. 

Fire Brick and Fire Clay. 

A. B. C, Ontario. — "Could you in- 
form us where we can purchase Key- 
stone Fire Brick and Fire City in car- 
load lots?" 

Ontario Lime Association, Toronto. — 
Editor. 



FINE CORONATION GIFT TO THE 
KING. 

As an expression of their unswerving 
loyalty to the British Crown, the Sas- 
katchewan Grain Growers' Association 
has presented to His Imperial Majesty 
King George V., as a coronation gift, an 
exquisitely designed Sterling silver cen- 
tre piece, taking the form of a magni- 
ficent bread basket. 

The Grain Growers of Saskatchewan 
believe Canada will be the "Granary of 
the Empire," and as Saskatchewan is 
the largest grain growing Province in 
Canada, they believe their Province will 
be "The Bread Basket of the Empire." 
The design of the gift, therefore, took 
the outline and form of a magnificent 
bread basket centre piece, which stands 
36 inches high, with a width of 22 
inches. 

The decorations on this fine centre 
piece are emblematic of Canada. The 
basket proper, exceptionally graceful in 
outline, is artistically saw-pierced and 
embellished with delicately executed 
maple leaves and sprays of Red Fife 
winter wheat. On one side, beautifully 
42 



etched, is the Canadian Beaver and 
Dominion coat-of-arms, while on the re- 
verse side is the Saskat cliewan COat-of- 
anns, together with the Grain Growers' 
motto, i.e., "Fiat Justitia Ruat Coel- 
iiin. 

The handle of the basket is grace- 
fully festooned with sprays of wheat so 
delicately modeled and finished that a 
second or third look is almost necessary 
to realize that they are not actual, but 
cunningly wrought models. The heads 
of the wheat are of solid gold, while the 
leaves and stems are colored true to na- 
ture. Intertwined with the sprigs of 
the wheat, the presentation inscription 
appears. 

The distinction of furnishing this 
basket to the Grain Growers' Associ- 
ation was intrusted to Mr. B. C. Crich- 
ton, a leading Jeweler of Moose Jaw, 
Saskatchewan. It was exclusively ori- 
ginal and characteristically Canadian in 
design — produced from silver and gold 
mined in Canada, and made by Canadian 
skilled artists. 

The details of the construction were 
carried out for Mr. Crichton by the 
Meriden Britannia Co., of Hamilton, 
Ont. 



INSTRUCTIVE BOOKLET ON SAWS. 

An exceedingly neat booklet has re- 
been issued by Shurly-Dietrich Co., of 
Gait, makers of "Maple Leaf" saws. In 
this booklet, which is entitled "The Art 
of Saw Making," all the principal oper- 
ations in making hand saws, are describ- 
ed and illustrated. Being printed in two 
colors, a very attractive appearance is 
given to the booklet, which is of vest 
pocket size. 

The illustration reproduced herewith, 
is one of those shown in this booklet. 
It gives an idea of that important oper- 




ation in saw making, known as "'ten- 
sioning." This means that the saws are 
smithed and hammered, so as to make 
them perfectly flat. It is necessary that 
this work should be done by experienced 
sawmakers who have been carefully 
trained in the art. 

Shurly-Dietrich Co. are mailing this 
booklet direct, to all the carpenters on 
their list, and they will do this for any 
hardwareman who will supply them with 
a list of names. 



Method of Improving Sale of Cream Separators 

Christie Bros., Owen Sound, Have a Canvasser Who Visits Likely Purchasers in 
the Rural Districts — Holding of Demonstrations and Annual Sales Also Found 
to be Effective. 



A splendid opportunity presents itself 
at the present time for the sale of cream 
separators. The demand is heavy at this 
season and the hardwareman, who 
handles a stock of separators, can work 
up a large trade if he takes steps to 
draw custom to his store. 

Although it is sold through many 
sources, the cream separator logically 
belongs to the hardware dealer. He 
sells all other household and farming 
conveniences, such as washing machines 
and vacuum cleaners, in addition, he 
handles almost exclusively dairying sup- 
plies, such as pans, pails and trimmings. 
It is natural, therefore, that the public 
should go to the hardware store when a 
cream separator is needed. The fact re- 
mains, however, that a large share of 
the trade goes elsewhere for the simple 
reason that a stronger bid for the cus- 
tom is made in other quarters. 

"I handle cream separators," a well- 
known hardware dealer said, recently, 
"but I have never featured them. I 
have so many different lines of goods 
that I haven't the time or the space to 
do much with separators." 

If a line of goods is worth handling at 
all, it is worth handling well. The 
dealer in question sold possibly half a 
dozen cream separators a year, and this 
despite the fact that the particular 
make he handled was as good as any on 
the market. His profit in this depart- 
ment of the store was not therefore, 
very large, considering the possibilities 
that exist for a wide and profitable 
trade. \ \~\ 

The dealer who desires to improve his 
sales of separators should first look 
over his field carefully. He will find 
that a good percentage of the farmers 
in his section do not possess a separ- 
ator of any kind. A good many more 
will be ready to invest in a new one. 
He will find, however, that the farmer, 
in a matter of this kind, is a chronic 
procrastmator. Mr. Agriculturist may 
come to the conclusion in 1311 that he 
needs a cream separator but if left to 
himself, he will probablv make the pur- 
chase somewhere about 1014 This dis- 
position to put off for a little lomrer 
the purchase of a necessarv implement 
or utensil, does not ma^e the farmer a 
less valuable nrosnect. bv anv means. 
If approached in the right wav, he will 
close the deal as quicklv as anv other 
man. It is the heavv drag of his many 
duties, the great distance that he lives 
from town and the infrequency of his 



visits that causes the farmer to delay 
in such matters. 

The secret that the dealer should 
grasp, therefore, is that it pays to go 
to the farmer, when the farmer is slow 
in coming in of his own accord. Many 
hardwaremen have inaugurated canvass- 
ing systems with considerable success. 
Among the number are Christie Bros., 
of Owen Sound, who are this year con- 
ducting a canvass of the surrounding dis- 
trict, with a view largely to the sale of 
cream separators. 

Have Capable Canvassers. 

Some years ago, Christie Bros, fol- 
lowed the same plan with considerable 
success. They found that it paid as long 
as they kept a good man on the road. 
Salesmanship of this nature entails the 
possession of a rare combination of 
qualities — tact, suavity, perseverance 
and a certain degree of intuition. Every 
man can not make a success of it.. Fin- 
ally, therefore, they found it so difficult 
to get men who "fitted in" that they 
abandoned the idea. 

This spring, they secured a man who 
gave promise of making a success of the 
work and he was started out. He has 
since demonstrated to the fullest his 
capabilities and is bringing in a splendid 
amount of trade. 

He gives practically his whole time to 
outside work, driving out to some sec- 
tion each morning and making, as far as 
possible, a house-to-house canvass., As 
the season progresses, however, and 
"prospects" accumulate, his time will 
largely be devoted to seeing those who 
are down on his list as "probables." 
Every effort is made to secure the names 
of prospective purchasers, a great deal 
being done in this way in the store it- 
self. Customers irom the rural sections 
chat readily of the doings in their neigh- 
borhood and are always willing to tell 
if they know of anyone who is in need 
of any particular article. 

The salesman will frequently have to 
call several times at one place before 
the deal is closed. It is persistency 
which counts in such cases. Sometimes, 
if it is deemed necessarv, he takes out 
a separator with him to show the cus- 
tomer. The opportunity thus presented 
of demonstrating the working of the 
machine enables the salesman verv fre- 
quently to close up the deal without 
further ado. 

Visit Fall Fairs. 

Christie Bros, also make it a point 
to have a representative at all the fall 
43 



fairs in that section. They find that it 
is possible, not only to make many 
sales on such occasions, but to secure a 
list of "prospects" which can be follow- 
ed up later. 

Hold Demonstrations. 

Many hardware dealers get good re- 
sults from the holding of demonstra- 
tions. It has been amply proven that a 
demonstration of stoves is a telling 
method of interesting the public. Equal- 
ly good results can be obtained with 
cream separators. 

It is also found profitable to hold 
dairy supply sales, in which separators 
naturally form an important feature. 
Turnbull & Cutcliffe, of Brantford. 
make this an annual feature. They hold 
a dairy supply sale in February or 
March each year and have gradually 
worked up interest in it until now it is 
one of the big features of their yearly 
programme. They advertise heavily in 
the local papers for a week in advance, 
using generally half page space. In ad- 
dition to the large stock of dairy pans, 
milk cans and pails, sold, they dispose 
of a large number of cream separators 
during the two days usually occupied by 
the sale. 

Take Up the Line. 

There are many hardwaremen to be 
found in all sections of the country who 
do not carry separators whose facilities 
for handling them are unexcelled. They 
have never taken them into stock, 
largely through indifference. It would 
pay them to make a move now and lay 
in an initial stock. The demand in all 
parts is steady and, what is more to 
thepoint, it can be livened up consider- 
ably by any dealer who cares to go after 
the business in an aggressive way. 



CLEEKS' ASSOCIATION FOR ST. 
JOHN'S. 

St. John, N.B., June 30.— If present 
plans materialize, there will before long 
be a strong association of clerks in St. 
John, which will have much to do with 
business matters of interest to them 
Plans are under way for the formation 
of an organization comprising clerks in 
all branches of trade and when organiz- 
ed, it is expected that their member- 
ship will be between 1,200 and 1,400. 
The objects of the association proposed 
are the betterment of the conditions of 
clerks' livings, a purpose which covers 
a wide range. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



News and Methods of Canadian Hardwaremen 

Great Sales of Electric Fans — Improvements Made by Calgary 
Dealers — More Half-Holidays Announced. 



A RUN ON ELECTRIC FANS. 

Montreal, July 7.— During the past 
week with the mercury straining its 
neck to reach and remain at the cen- 
tury mark Montrealcrs made a vain 
effort to keep cool. One result of this 
was a shortage of electric fans. A rep- 
resentative of Hardware & Metal called 
at an electric retail house yesterday 
and was informed that they had sold 
out everything that resembled an elec- 
tric fan. "Have you got any to sell?" 
was the question asked before an expla- 
nation was made. 

This dealer stated that he could not 
buy a fan. "The wholesalers are clean- 
ed out," he said. "During the last 
hour I got three orders for immediate 
delivery but I had to pass them up. I 
sold eighty fans in the past week and I 
could have sold more." This may not 
cover the whole situation but it sug- 
gests the business that was done and 
the opportunity that presented itself to 
those who had a stock. It also demon- 
strates that fans are coming more and 
more into general use. Many of the 
orders were for homes as well as of- 
fices. 



PUBLISHING HARDWARE NEWS. 

Belmont, Manitoba. — Box Bros., deal- 
ers in hardware, furniture and harness, 
are the latest to take up the newspap- 
er form of advertising, which has been 
adopted recently by quite a number of 
hardwaremen. The first edition appear- 
ed in the Belmont News of June 29, 
and contained a sprinkling of items of 
news as well as advertising matter. 
Among the articles advertised in this 
issue are harvesting tools, harness, 
Paris green, alabastine and tinsmithing 
supplies. Among the news items was 
an announcement that the store would 
be closed every Thursday afternoon in 
July and August. Box Bros, call their 
ad. "The Hardware News." 



A REDUCTION SALE. 

Ridgetown, Ont. — J. Goldberg is ad- 
vertising a special sale of hardware, 
granite and chinaware. For a period of 
thirty days, a discount of 25 per cent, 
on all goods will be given. Among the 
goods mentioned in his advertising are 
linseed oil, turpentine, paints, screen 
doors, sprinkling cans, nails, staples, 
churns, wringers, ice cream freezers. 



ENLARGING THEIR STORE. 

Kelowna, B.C.— E. C. Scott & Co. arc 
to be known in future as the Kelowna 
Hardware and Specialty Co. They have 
decided to enlarge the scope of their 
business very considerably and as a 
first step have rented the next store 
now occupied by another merchant. 
When added to their present premises, 
this will give the firm largely increased 
space and will enable them to display 
their goods to better advantage. A 
large new stock of general hardware 
has been ordered and will be placed in 
the store by the first of the month. 



CALGARY DEALERS MAKING 
IMPROVEMENTS. 

Calgary, June 30th, 1911.— The hard- 
ware business in this city is very brisk 
at the present time, owing to the im- 
mense amount of building going on here 
this year. One dealer in the East end 
reports a forty per cent increase over 
1910. The Calgary Hardware Stores, 
Limited, are building a new addition to 
their East Calgary branch. When com- 
pleted, this addition will double their 
present floor space. This firm is making 
great progress. 

The McBride Hardware Co., wholesale 
and retail, have just completed a very 
elaborate front to their retail store on 
Eighth Avenue. This improvement 
adds very largely to the appearance of 
their store. 

At the time of writing, the annual 
fair is just opening and the retail stores 
have their windows decorated in a very 
attractive style, anticipating a visit 
from their country customers. The 
Coiner Hardware have a window that is 
well worthy of comment. While J. H: 
Ashdown & Co. have a magnificent dis- 
play of brass goods. These two firms 
are noted for their window displays of 
seasonable goods from time to time. 

At the time of writing there is a Tin- 
ners' strike in this city. We hope, how- 
ever, that a compromise will be made 
in the near future, satifactory to both 
parties. 



HALF HOLIDAY AT GODERICH. 

Goderich, Ont. — The hardware mer- 
chants of Goderich have announced that 
they have agreed to close their stores at 
one o'clock every Wednesday afternoon 
during the months of July and August. 
Chas. C. Lee, C. J. Harper, M. W. How- 

44 



(11, Fi"il. Hunt and YV. K. Pinder have 
all affixed their names to the agreement. 
A notable degree of fraternal feeling 
has always been evidenced among the 
hardwaremen here, of which this is only 
another instance. 



HALF HOLIDAYS AT BARRIE. 

Barrie. — The merchants of this town 
have decided to close their places of 
business on Wednesday afternoon dur- 
ing July and August. The new plan 
was inaugurated on Wednesday of this 
week, and clerks and proprietors alike 
enjoyed the chance to cool off a little, 
after the extremely hot weather. 



A SMELTER NEAR KINGSTON. 

Kingston, July 4.— S. Birch, of the 
firm of McKelvey & Birch, has. returned 
home from Montreal, where he was en- 
gaged in superintending the installation 
of a hot water plant in the Bank of 
Montreal. 

Work on the erection of the new 
smelter, for the American Smelting 
Company will be commenced next month. 
The smelter will cost about $36,000. 
The company expected to start work 
some time ago, but was not prepared 
to ship ore from its property in Lough- 
boro, as the Canadian Northern Rail- 
way, whose line will go right through 
its property, had not commenced to 
build the line. Now, however, as this 
road is to be rushed ahead, work will 
also be rushed on the smelter. 

On the farm of J. W. Hill, about 
four miles from Seeley's Bay, there has 
been found platinum, iron and feldspar. 
Mr. Hill was prospecting upon his farm 
when he made the find. He sent 
samples to Ottawa, and they were 
found to contain: Platinum, four per 
cent., iron, fifty per cent., and the 
feldspar, pure- Mr. Hill states that 
iron is cropping out at the surface and 
the platinum two feet below the sur- 
face. It is likely that a mine will be 
opened up in the near future. 



MARITIME PROVINCES. 

A destructive fire took place this week 
in Woodstock, KB., in the machinery es- 
tablishment of Small & Fisher Co. which 
did considerable damage before being 
extinguished. 

The Sumner Co., Moncton, are adver- 
tising fishing tackle and supplies. They 
are using good space in the local papers. 

Geo. R. Heustis, the Winsted Hard- 
ware Mfg. Co., Winsted, Conn., is visit- 
ing his father, Leander Heustis, Yar- 
mouth. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Ontario. 

In the retail store of Rice Lewis and 
Son, a window display of electi'ic fans 
is shown. 

M. Weiehel & Son, Waterloo, an- 
nounce: "We have sold more gas ranges 
and plates than any previous year." 

Roy Grills, of the Geo. Taylor Hard- 
ware Co., New Liskeard, is on a trip to 
North Bay, as a member of the grand 
jury. 

Franklin Bros., Dunnville, have moved 
their stoves and tinware stock from their 
old premises to the store of W. G. 
Scott. 

The hardwaremen of London have de- 
cided to observe Thursday afternoon as 
a half holiday through the summer 
months. 

The hardware merchants of Preston 
have decided to close every evening at 
6.30 with the exception of Wednesdays 
and Saturdays. 

R. Milford & Son, Carp, are leaving 
for Smith 's Falls and have rented their 
property to Geo. Bateman who will open 
a tinshop there. 

A fire occurred at the Scarfe Varnish 
Works, Brantford, doing damage to the 
extent of $2,000. The blaze started in 
one of the warerooms. 

The baseball team of the Hobbs Hard- 
ware Co. are doing well in the London 
Commercial League. They recently de- 
feated McCormicks by 7 to 1. 

The Russill Hardware Co., Toronto, 
have a window display of paint special- 
ties. Oil finishes for furniture and other 
lines of a similar nature are offered at 
reduced prices. 

Hamilton has secured four new in- 
dustries, including the Mayor-Brown 
Co., manufacturers of brass goods and 
the Boston Insulated Wire and Cable 
Co., of Dorchester, Mass. 

Ross E. Young, of Young Bros., Hun- 
over, was united in marriage to Miss 
Mabel A. Dibble, of Flint, Midi. Mr. 
and Mrs. Young spent their honeymoon 
in Smith's Falls and Muskoka. 

Angus Monroe, a member of the 
hardware staff of R. P. Butchart. Owen 
Sound, had the tendons of his wrist cut 
while putting a handle on an axe. Al- 
though very painful, the injury will not 
prove serious. 

The death occurred on Monday, at his 
home, 189 Madison Ave., Toronto, of 
Chas. E. Levey, secretary-treasurer of 
the Canada Glass Mantels and Tile Co. 
He was buried on Wednesday, under 
Masonic auspices. 

Taylor Bros., Lanark, have equipped 
their tinshop with new machines and 
tools to replace those destroyed in the 
recent fire. The new machines are of 



the latest design and are of greater cap- 
acity than those previously in use. 

A. E. Stephens, formerly with J. B. 
Ross, Oshawa, is leaving for the Old 
Country but, before sailing, he will visit 
former friends in Guelph. After a two 
months' visit in his old home at Lay- 
ton, Essex, he will return to Canada and 
engage in the hardware business in the 
West. 

W. S. Fisher, of Emerson & Fisher, 
St. John, N.B., accompanied by his son, 
was a caller at the Toronto office of 
Hardware and Metal, this week. Mr. 
Fisher, Jr., has just completed a three 
years' course at the Royal Military Col- 
lege and will probably go into business 
with his father. 

Follis Berney, an employe of A. 
Welch and Son, Toronto, was drowned 
Sunday while bathing at Port Sidney, 
Muskoka. He was affected by sunstroke 
and fell out of a canoe, sinking before 
help could arrive. He was a son of 
George Berney, hardware merchant, 
Galedon. East. Before going to Toronto, 
lie was employed with Harry Occomore, 
Guelph. 

W. C. Mitchell, until recently general 
superintendent of the Dominion Iron 
and Steel Co. at Sydney, has assumed 
the management of the Algoma Steel 
Co., succeeding A. Ernest, who will re- 
tain the position of consulting engineer. 

Jos. Bell, Haileybury, has opened a 
hardware store at Swastika and left 
Wednesday to open up. Errol Neil ac- 
companied him. 

On Wednesday the wedding took 
place in St. George's Church, Guelph, 
of John Ridout McMillan to Mrs. J. A. 
Wilcocks. The groom is a member of 
die firm of McMillan Bros., who reeent- 
lv sold their hardware business in 
Guelph to D. L. Myers, of Stratford. 

On July first, the partnership existing 
between Thos. A. White and Edwin A. 
White, who conducted a hardware busi- 
ness under the name of White & Son, 
at Bruce Mines, was dissolved. The 
I'usnvss will be continued by Edwin A. 
White. 

Quebec. 

Mr. Mitchell, director of the das. 
Cartland & Son, Birmingham, Eng., 
brass founders, visited the local trade 
this week. 

Arthur Tritsch. general manager of the 
International Distributing Co., spent the 
past week in the Laurentian mountains 
on a fishing trip. 

Archie MacFarlane, agent for Wosten- 
holm's cutlery and other lines has left 
for Europe and will probably be absent 
for about a month. 

It is generally believed among the 
trade that the question of the proposed 
45 



amalgamation of wholesalers will be set- 
tled one way or another by the middle 
of the month. 

F. H. Scott Canadian agent for Ches- 
terman's, and Maleham & Yeomans, 
England, has returned from a trip to 
the Old Country where he paid a visit 
to the factories of these two firms. 

Edwin Edwards, of the Sandow Phy- 
sical Appliance Co., Sandow Hall, Lon- 
don, W.C., was a recent visitor to the 
Montreal trade. His present business 
trip is practically around the globe. 

Among the retail hardwaremen in 
Montreal on business during the past 
week were, J. B. Damour, of St. Philo- 
mene ; Aime Lemieux, of Henryville ; J. 
A. Paquin, of St. Eustache ; Corriveau 
Frere, of St. Sebastien. 

Chas. J. Walker, of the purchasing de- 
partment of Lewis Bros., returned to 
work this week, a benedict. His mar- 
riage with Miss Blanche R. Beswicke, 
418 Metcalf Ave., Westmount, was 
solemnized on June 14. in the church of 
St. James the Apostle. Mr. and Mrs. 
Walker spent two weeks in the Muskoka 
Lakes district. 

J. E. Pothier, who has been with 
Ooderre Fils, Sherbrooke. One., as a 
hardware clerk, has joined the selling 
staff of Lewis Bros. He has been ap- 
pointed to the vacancv caused bv the 
death of J. A. Demers The territory 
to be covered bv Mr Potbier includes 
Ouebec Citv and intermediate points to 
Chicoutimi. 

A fierce fire broke out in some sheds 
belonging' to the Canada Paint Co.t 
Montreal. Some emptv barrels and a 
few casks of paint and varnish cinght 
fire and crmsed a brilliant blaze. The 
firemen succeeded in extinguishing the 
blaze without diffieultv. The loss was 
eomparativelv small. 

J. R. Terrill. with Caverhill. Lear- 
mont & Co.. Montreal, has been ap- 
pointed school commissioner for the re- 
cently annexed northern portion of the 
citv. His election, bv the wav, was by 
acclamation, the onlv other nominee hav- 
ing retired. Anart from his business ac- 
tivities. Mr. Terrill has found time to 
devote to the welfare of public, hav- 
ing served as a councillor of Ahuntsic, 
a suburb of Montreal. 

Western Provinces. 

Larson Bros, have commenced a hnrd- 
ware business at Penzance, Sask. 

The Farmers' Steel and Wire Co will 
erect a large warehouse at Regina. 

The Merchants' Hardware Specialties 
Ltd.. Calgarv, have been incorporated. 

D. Brown, hardware dealer, Qu 'Ap- 
pelle, Sask., has suffered a loss bv fire. 

D. J. Wallace, Winnipeg, has sold his 
hardware stock to Whiting Hardware 
Co. 

Latimer and Hart are starting a hard- 
ware and building business at Leth- 
bridge. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Advertising for the Absent Vacationists 

City Papers More Carefully Read by the Lake and Mountain 
Summerers— A Hardwareman Who Takes Advantage of This 
to Anticipate the Fall Buying Season. 



Montreal, June 29.— Can anything be 
done during tho summer months to 
keep business running along at least 
about the normal mark? This is a 
question that doubtless appeals to the 
average hardware retailer now that the 
dull season, as LI is often called, is ap- 
proaching, in Montreal, for instance, 
there is a general movement away from 
the citj i" the cooler and more comfort- 
able resorts along the river and in the 
mountains. 

In this manner the buying public are 
drawn away from the stores. A well 
dressed window will have little attrac- 
tion to them during the two midsummer 
months, for they are keeping away from 
the business streets. The dealer, of 
bourse, can always avail himself of the 
opportunity of sitting still until the peo- 
ple return from their summering or he 
may even take a pleasure trip of his 
own to Colorado or through the Tyrol. 
But the dealer who is still "on the job" 
even when there is a tendency to dull- 
ness, will hardly be contented with just 
what fortune is likely to lead to its 
door. 

Time for an Extra Effort. 

When there is a period of dullness ap- 
proaching, the good business man tries 
to find something that will attract the 
public's attention in spite of the weather 
and precedent. The hardware employer 
naturally likes a holiday himself but 
that does not mean that this store is go- 
ing to be locked up just the same. Busi- 
ness must go on and the better it moves 
during the dull season the better will be 
the showing next January when stock 
taking time arrives. 

Newspaper Advertising Helps. 
H. Bernier with L. J. A. Surveyer, one 
of Montreal's prominent hardware men, 
finds that the newspaper affords one 
splendid method of reaching the people 
who have left the city behind them for 
the summer. Local papers give good de- 
livery service for miles around and it is 
simply a matter of changing the ad- 
dresses of newspaper readers for two 
months. 

To a representative of Hardware and 
Metal, Mr. Bernier said, "You know the 
newspaper seems to mean more at the 
summer house than when it is received 
in the city. It is a link or a bond by 
which citizens are made aware of what 
is transpiring in the city and the world 
at large while they are enjoying the 
country and its invigorating air. 



More Carefully Perused. 

"From our own experience you know 
how welcome the daily paper is even 
when it may be a day or two late. In 
the city you would scorn it, but at the 
summer home you carefully peruse it, 
page after page. We continue our ad- 
vertising during the summer and often 
call attention to articles which we 
think will appeal to people away from 
the city. From my own experience I 
know that results have been obtained. 
People come in and ask for goods that 
were advertised at such and such a 
time." 

What to Advertise. 

It remains with the individual as to 
what he shall decide to advertise. 
Screens, hammocks, water filters, fishing 
tackle, tools, ammunition, are all good 
for a boost in the advertising space. 
Lanterns and electric flashlights are 
worth an effort. The lantern is a favor- 
ite and the flashlight has also found a 
ready demand. One man may think of 
a certain line and find it successful and 
still another will think of some other 
article equally good." 

Is Worth While. 

This going after summer trade is sure- 
ly worthy of consideration by retailers 
who may be located in places like Mont- 
real. Throughout many parts of the 
provinces towns and cities can be named 
that are in almost the same position as 
Montreal in this regard. Probably the 
retailers are alive to their opportunities 
and again some may not be making the 
most of them. 

Hardware dealers here and there offer 
prizes for the largest fish caught in some 
district. This offer naturally arouses 
interest and affords an additional means 
of creating an interest in hardware busi- 
ness during those days when during the 
midsummer heat a man would prefer an 
hour's rest after dinner to turning back 
to the store or when the allurments of 
his summer home, if he can boast of one, 
attract so strongly. 



Geo. H. Saywell, who will call upon 
the Canadian wholesale trade in the in- 
terests of several English firms. They 
are, Evered & Co., brass founders, Bir- 
mingham ; Robt. Sorby & Sons, manu- 
facturers of tools and saws, Sheffield ; 
Slack & Brownlow, manufacturers of 
germproof filters, aluminum ware and 
scales. 

Mr. Saywell has an extensive display 
of goods including 1,500 pieces of brass 
ware, 150 joiners' and engineers' tools, 




ENGLISH TRAVELER VISITING 
CANADIAN TRADE. 

Montreal, July 7.— The Canadian hard- 
ware trade are gradually becoming ac- 
quainted with English manufacturers as, 
year after year, this market is invaded 
with new lines of goods produced in the 
Old Country. 

During the past week the number of 
companies thus represented, was in- 
creased by the arrival in Montreal, of 
46 



GEO. H. SAYWELL, 

Who is Visiting Canada as Represent- 
ative of Several English Firms. 

30 saws, 27 filters, 72 gas mantles, alu- 
minum ware, etc. His itinerary includes 
Montreal, Ottawa, Toronto, Hamilton, 
London, Fort William, Winnipeg, Por- 
tage, Brandon, Regina, Saskatoon, Ed- 
monton, Calgary and Vancouver. 

With the growth of business relations 
between the "manufacturers of England 
and Canadian houses the ties of the 
Empire, a subject often mentioned now, 
are bound to be cemented. Mr. Say- 
well's lines represent the work of 6,500 
skilled workmen of the old land. Mr. 
Saywell has spent 17 years in the hard- 
ware trade and has the theoretical as 
well as practical knowledge. 



ESTABLISHING A BRANCH. 

The National Screen and Wire Co., 
Albion, Mich., are building a branch 
factory at Windsor, Ont. The plant 
will cost $20,000 and it is expected 
that fifty hands will be hired at the 
start. 



New Hardware Goods 



A NEW WAY OF IRONING. 

"Iwantu," is the name of a new 
patented gas heated sad iron, now be- 
ing made and introduced into Canada 
by the McClary Mfg. Co., London, 
Ont. 

It is claimed that the "Iwantu" iron 
consumes about three feet of gas per 
hour, or thirty feet in ten hours, the 
time it takes to do the ironing in an 
average family. At $1 per thousand, 
this would amount to about 3 cents, as 
compared with from 50 to 70 cents to 
heat the irons with coal, for the same 
period. 

The "Iwantu" can be used in any 
room in the house from kitchen to gar- 
ret where there is gas, by simply at- 
taching a tube with which it is sup- 
plied to any gas jet or fixture, which 
requires only a few seconds to con- 
nect, and in four minutes it is ready 
for any and all kinds of ironing — wet 
or dry, light or heavv. 




Although heated with gas it is claim- 
ed that there are no fumes or odors 
and no danger, and it might have ap- 
propriately been called an air heated 
iron for the reason that it burns more 
air than gas, i.e.: It burns about 30 
per cent, gas and 70 per cent, air, 
which is so mixed with the gas that 
perfect combustion with a purple blue 
flame is created, radiating heat which 
is distributed evenly over the base of 
the iron, heating uniformly all parts 
from the toe to the heel. This not 
only heats quickly, but the iron is so 
constructed that the heat is retained 
so that after heating it for about ten 
to fifteen minutes, it can be disconnect- 
ed in a second— if so desired— and car- 
ried to the porch, yard or lawn,, or any 
cool place about the premises where, 
with the heat retained, the next half 
to three-quarters of an hour's ironing 



can be done in comfort with ease and 
pleasure. 

A novel feature in connection with 
this iron is that it can be used as a 
heater by simply turning a small lever 
screw to remove the cover and then 
placing a cup or any other small ves- 
sel above the burner, which is so con- 
structed that even with the cover off, 
the flames cannot get outside the body 
of the iron to burn or even scorch the 
most delicate fabric; or, it can be 
turned 'bottom-side up and placed across 
the stand (which comes with it) there- 
by converting it into a hot plate. 



"SHARK" ADJUSTABLE WRENCH. 

A quick action adjustable allegator 
wrench for general purpose work, is 
being marketed under the name of 
"Shark," by the Richards-Wilcox Co., 
of Aurora, 111. It is adjustable from 
I to If inch, and, while it may be 
used as a pipe wrench it is equally 
good for bolts and nuts, either square 
or hexagonal. 

The manufacturers state that with 
this wrench corners and angles are eas- 
ily accessible, and that it has a "bull 
dog grip" which does not slip. The 
"Shark" wrench is made in two sizes, 
8 and 12 inches in length, respectively. 

SASH LOCK AND WINDOW ADJUST- 
MENT. 
A simple device in a sash fastener has 
recently been invented and is being mar- 
keted by the Hunnable Sash Lock & 
Window Adjustment Syndicate, whose 




head office is at Hamilton, Ont. This 
sash fastener also acts as a sash opener, 
adjuster and lock. 

It is stated that this sash lock, with- 
out the expense of a box frame, sash 
47 



cords, pulleys and weights, performs 
practically the same service, and also 
locks the two sashes together, thereby 
preventing outside intrusion, while at 
the same time admitting fresh air. 

It is claimed that with this device it 
is easy to open the window for clean- 
ing, and to adjust the sashes at any 
position desired. 



BALL BEARING TROLLEY HANG- 
ERS. 

The Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 
111., is placing upon the market a full 
line of ball bearing trolley hangers. 
They are made in six sizes, to carry 
doors of all sizes, and especially adapt- 
ed for garage work and warehouses. 

The trucks consist of drop forged 




yokes, with four wheels to each hang- 
er, as shown in the accompanying illus- 
tration. Hangers are equipped with 
both vertical and horizontal adjust- 
ments. The company has illustrated 
these in their No. 11 catalogue, and 
we suggest that our readers write for 
this handy reference book. 



The firm of A. B. Ormsby, Ltd., has 
been awarded the contract for the new 
Winnipeg Central Y. M. C. A. and the 
new Allan Line Steamship building. 

The Vernon Hardware Co., Vernon,- 
B.C., have offered $75, to be divided in- 
to first and second prizes of $50 and 
$25 respectively for the best ten boxes 
of apples grown in the Okanagan from 
trees sprayed by the Bean pump. The 
prize has been contributed to the Tail 
fair prize list. 



HARD W A R K AND M ETA L 



CANADIAN METAL MARKETS 

See Itemized Market Quotations on Page 60. 



MARKETS IN BRIEF 
Montreal. 



Turpentine. — Down le. 
Linseed Oil.- Down 2c. 



MONTREAL. 
Montreal, July 7. -Numerous holidays, 
combined with intense heat, partially ex- 
plain the comparative quietness that 
prevailed in the metal markets during 
the past week. Canada had the first of 
July off, the United States 
followed with the fourth, and 
and is .just beginning to 
settle down after the ceremonies in con- 
nection with the coronation. This con- 
dition naturally had the effect of creat- 
ing more or less quietness and the hot 
wave did not stimulate business. The 
result is that there is no particular fea- 
ture to report this week. The pig iron 
situation is unchanged and the other 
metals do not show any special move- 
ment. It is learned that there has of 
late been more lead brought in from the 
Old Country than is usually the case, 
owing to what is termed temporary light 
home production. This latter results 
more from the labor end of the work 
and will pass, it is said, with the settle- 
ment of whatever difficulties may exist. 
Tin has been holding out at the figures 
which have been quoted for some time 
ami does not seem to show any particu- 
lar weakness. Copper is rather firmly 
held, but, as before stated, there has 
been nothing of particular moment dur- 
ing the week. 

Pig Iron — There is no change in the 
Canadian situation. There is a steady 
demand for pig iron reported throughout 
the country with United States prices 
still on a basis that is not regarded as 
favorable to Canadian furnaces, especial- 
ly in the west. Business here has been 
pretty much the same from week to week 
recently, and so far there is no change. 
1 'rices on dock Montreal, are: No. 1 
merlee, $20; Select Summerlee, 
$19.50; Soft Summerlee, $19.00; No. 3 
( leveland and Clarence $16,50 to $17.00. 
Tin — This market has been quiet, and 
while there has been no change locallv. 
primary market this week showed a 
weakening tendency, due to a certain ex- 
tent to increased supplies. Business is 
still for present requirements and the 
Ideal pi ice is unchanged at 48 cents. 

Copper.— During the past week cop- 
per has shown an easier tendency. Lo- 
callv there is a steady demand with the 



price a. las! week's figure. Primary 
markets show signs of an easier feeling 
lint whether it will remain thus for 
long is, as usual, the problem of the 
I rade. 

Lead. There is nothing new to re- 
port in regard to lead. As stated above 
there has been a considerable amount 
of lead imported owing to home produc- 
tion showing some curtailment of late 
This, of course, is only temporary. The 
market is steady with price unchanged. 

Spelter. — The market is featureless 
Demand is normal and the price un- 
changed. Primary market conditions 
are favorable. 

Old Metals. — Trade in old materials is 
steady and prices are as follows: — • 
Heavy copper and wire, lie; heavy red 
brass, 10c; heavy lead, 2%e; light cop- 
per and bottoms, 9c; tea lead, 21%c; 
machinery cast iron, No. 1, $14.50; No. 
t wrought iron, $12.50; malleable, No. 
1, $9; miscellaneous steel, $5; stove 
plate, $12.50. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 7th, 1911. — This is 
never a busy season in the metal trade, 
and it is not surprising to learn that 
there has not been much business offer- 
ing during the past week. The record- 
breaking heat wave has seriously af- 
fected the demand and, as a matter of 
fact there has probably been less actual 
business booked than for some little 
time past. 

In the Toronto district the principal 
foundries have all been practically clos- 
ed down on account of the heat. On 
Monday and Tuesday none of them made 
any attempt to operate, and not an im- 
portant iron-working plant here, has 
worked to capacity at any time during 
the week. This has necessarily affected 
the consumption of pig iron, so that no. 
inquiries of any moment, have material- 
ized. 

A very encouraging feature of the sit- 
uation is that conditions are really im- 
proving in the United States. The out- 
look for the latter part of the year is 
considered quite promising, and Cana- 
dian furnaces as well as importers of 
British pig iron are looking forward to 
a cessation of the extremely low prices 
which have been quoted by American 
furnaces recently, in the Canadian mar- 
ket. 

Competition among metal merchants 
has been unusually keen this week, and 
some low prices have been quoted for 
the little business that offered. 

Ti n . — The fact that prices continue on 
the same high level as for some time 
past, shows that the strength of the 

48 



S ndicate is undiminished. Stocks are 

very liglrl on every hand, and one of 
I lie leading Toronto jobbers sold out 
all the tin they had on hand, to-day. 
The price quoted locally is the same as 
last week. 

An ;imony. — Trading is quiet, but not 
quite so lifeless as it was during the 
last few months. Prices remain un- 
; hanged. 

(Upper. — The situation is just about 
the same as last week. Trade in U. S. 
is not yet active but an early improve- 
ment is looked for. Meanwhile Toronto 
quotations remain unchanged. 

Plates and Sheets. — In this line a 
steady improvement is taking place 
which is quite unexpected for this time 
of the year. 

Pig Iron. — Competition from U. S. 
sources is diminishing, but local mer- 
chants have all made strong efforts to 
land any business that was going. Con- 
sumption this week was very light, ow- 
ing to the extreme heat. Prices quoted 
are as follows: 

Canadian Foundry No. 1, $19 and No. 
2, 50 cents a ton less. Old Country iron 
is quoted at $19.50 for Middlesboro' No. 
3; and $20.25 for Clarence No. 3; Sum- 
merlee No. 2 is $22, and Cleveland No. 
1, $20.50. Jarrow and Glengarnock 
irons are at $20 and $22 respectively. 

Lead. — A fair business is being done 
at unchanged prices. Stocks are light. 

Spelter — This metal continues to show 
strength, but the expected advance has 
not yet eventuated. 

Old metals — We are still quoting: 
Heavy copper and wire, IOV2C to lie; 
heavy red brass, 7y 2 c; heavy lead, $2.90: 
light copper and bottoms, 9 3 /4c; tea lead, 
$2.40; machinery cast iron, No. 1, $14; 
No. 1 wrought, $10; malleable No. 1, $8 
to $10; miscellaneous steel, $6 to $7; 
stove plate, $12.50. 



"Western Provinces. 

A. J. Box, of Box Bros., Belmont, 
Man., has returned from Sewell, where 
he was in camp with the 12th Manitoba 
Dragoons. 

The Souris Hardware Co., Souris, 
Man., have sold out to F. and J. Field, 
Bradwardine. 

Harry Deacon, Invermay, has pur- 
chased the hardawre stock of Neuert 
Bros, and Tullock. He is now moving 
into his new store. 

The Watrous Hardware Co., composed 
of J. F. Clarke, president, R. M. Mac- 
Leod and T. J. Tollack, have started 
in business at Watrous. 

McLachlan Bros., Vancouver, have 
disposed of the manufacturing end of 
their business to the Scoullar Sheet 
Metal Works and will devote their en- 
tire attention to the retail hardware 
trade. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 7. — Conditions during 
the past week have been uneventful ex- 
cept for a hot wave that made \\ ork 
anything but a delight, and more than 
one clerk would have given a veek's 
salary for the opportunity of meeting 
old Adam in some dark alleyway. Busi- 
ness did not show any falling off, Low- 
ever, and a good sorting trade is re- 
ported. Demand for household goods es- 
pecially those required in preserving «;re 
going well. Home scales, preserving 
jars, kettles, and such lines have been 
quite popular. From the cities through- 
out the country there is still a h ..Ithy 
enquiry for builders' goods and there is 
still a demand for harvest tools. The 
movement in fall lines has not amounted 
to much yet, but it will not likely lie 
long now until there is more .ttention 
devoted to this preparation for the next 
season. 

Lawn and Garden Tools. — The warm 
weather has resulted in continuing the 
demand for lawn accessories. Snrir.k- 
lers, nozzles, couplings, hose, snears Mid 
lawn mowers are going out to a certain 
extent, orders in this department being 
of a sorting up variety. Discounts in 
garden hose range from 50 per cc it. off 
to 70 and 10 and 10, according n qual- 
ity. We quote hose clamp, a to f-in., 
25c a doz. , hose couplings, i to f-in., 
$1 a doz. ; hose sprinklers, ring pat- 
terns, $5.75 a doz. ; revolving pattern, 
12-in., $13 a doz. ; 24-in., $31 a doz., 
and 36-in., at $39 a doz. ; hose nozzles, 
Gem, $3.50 a doz. ; reels, 75c each and 
upwards. The discount offered is 50 and 
50 per cent. 

Harvest Tools.— The demand for har- 
vest tools is appreciable and on the 
whole a big business should be done if 
the present crops are unhurt. Some 
quotations and discounts are : Hay 
forks, manure forks, straw forks, barley 
forks, spading forks, potato forks, field, 
garden hoses, Dutch weeding hoes, gar- 
den rakes, 50 and 5 p.c. ; hay rakes, 
$1.15 to $2.75 a doz. ; scythes, $6 to $8 
a doz. ; sickles, $1.85 to $2.25 a doz. ; 
grass hooks, $1.65 to $2.10 a doz. ; 
snaths, 40 p.c. discount. 

Seasonable Lines — A good sorting up 
business shows that seasonable lines are 
still in demand. Ice cream freezers, 
hammocks, and quite a long list of ar- 
ticles are still included here and there on 
order sheets. 

Household Utensils. — In this depart- 
ment there has been considerable atten- 
tion paid to articles used during preserv- 
ing time. Otherwise there is a fair gen- 
eral trade. Some of the prices quoted 
are : Food choppers, from $9 to $15 a 
doz. ; ice cream freezers, 1-qt. $1.50 ; 2- 
qt., $1.65 ; 3-qt., $2.05 ; 4-qt., $2.50 ; 



6-qt., $3.15 ; 8-qt., $4 ; coffee percolat- 
ors, $1.75 to $3.50 ; washing machines 
from $3.50 up ; wringers, Royal Can- 
adian, $47.75 per doz. ; Universal, $37.75 
per doz. ; Safety, $56.25 less 20 per cent, 
per doz. ; Mrs. Potts' irons, plain, 82^c. 
per set ; nickel-plated, 87^c. per set ; 
nickel-plated, 87^c. per set ; common 
sad irons, 4 to 7 lbs., $5 per cwt. 

Contractors' and Builders' Supplies. — 
Business does not show any appreciable 
falling off in this branch of trade re- 
ports bring still of a satisfactory na- 
ture. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 6. — Despite the extreme 
heat of the past week, business has been 
exceptionally good. It may possibly be 
that the demand will suffer as a result 
of the unusual weather conditions but so 
far there has been no indication of any- 
thing of this kind. On the contrary, 
some lines have been brisker than ever, 
as a result of the heat. 

The first signs of the hot spell saw an 
immediate revival of the demand for 
refrigerators. As the supply was still 
short, however, many orders went un- 
filled. There was also a heavy demand 
for screen doors and window screens, al- 
though most of the orders received were 
small. 

No price changes are recorded. A 
firm note is noted in all departments. 

Seasonable Goods. — As noted above, 
the demand for summer goods, such as 
refrigerators, screens, hose, etc., was re- 
vived as an immediate result of the 
weather conditions. Orders, for small 
quantity, immediate delivery, came in 
from all sections. In a majority of 
cases, the refrigerators ordered were of 
the cheaper grade and, as the market 
is absolutely devoid of such goods, the 
orders were not filled. The stock of 
cheap grade refrigerators was sold out 
some time ago and it has been practi- 
cally impossible to obtain further sup- 
plies since. "This has been a record 
year in refrigerators," stated a local 
jobber, to-day. "We have sold more 
than any previous year in my experi- 
ence. At that, we could not fill all 
oiders placed with us, on account of the 
shortage." 

The heat caused so heavy a demand 
for ice cream that the stores could not 
cope with it and, as a result, manv peo- 
ple bought ice cream freezers of their 
own. The call for freezers was unusu- 
ally heavy. Hammocks, tents, etc., also 
sold well all week. 

Household Goods. — The demand is 
well sustained in all lines. Preserving 
kettles are moving briskly and all vari- 
49 



otic-; of graniteware and tinware are 
selling. 

Harvest Tools. — The feature of the 
trade at the present time, perhaps, is 
the demand for harvest tools. Hay forks, 
scythes, field and garden hoes, rakes, 
sickles, etc., are all selling well. The 
retailers are stocking up now in the 
prospect of a heavy trade, when the 
harvesting begins. 

Builders' Hardware. — The warm 
weather has retarded building operations 
in some sections but there has been no 
noticeable diminuition in the demand 
for builders' hardware so far. In the 
city, the trade has gone along without 
any signs of slackening. Contractors 
and mechanics' tools are selling well. 

Heavy Hardware. — All varieties are 
brisk and firm. Bolts, nuts, screws, 
rivets, nails, etc., are all showing a 
healthy advance, the demand being now 
larger than for some time past. Pres- 
ent quotations are: Discounts on carri-' 
age bolts, % and less, 60 and 10 and 10; 
coach screws, 75 ; stove bolts, 80 and 7y 8 . 

Stoves and Heating Goods. — Although 
it may sound hardly credible, there has 
been a fairly good demand during the 
past week for oil and gasoline stoves. 
Some gas stoves have also been sold. 
The demand for furnaces is growing as 
the building season advances. 

Sporting Goods.— The demand is still 
good. Sorting up orders are being re- 
ceived from all parts, some of them large 
enough to indicate that there has been 
a healthy, all-around retail trade. 
Canoes have come into unusual popular- 
ity since Old Sol made his presence so 
keenly felt. 



TO TOUR THE WEST. 

Jos. Akitt, of Creemore, Ont., was a 
visitor of Hardware and Metal's Tor- 
onto office on Tuesday of this week. 

Mr. Akitt is taking advantage of the 
midsummer lull to make an extensive 
tour of Western Canada, and he left 
Toronto on the steamboat Express, 
Wednesday, on the first stage of his 
journey. 

Before returning home in September, 
Mr. Akitt will go West as far as Vic- 
toria, and will visit all the important 
places enroute. As this is his first 
Western trip, he intends doing the 
country thoroughly, so as to have an 
accurate idea of Canada's great prairie 
lands. 

During Mr. Akitt 's absence, his fine 
store at Creemore will be in charge of 
his son, Albert, who has secured the best 
of training in the hardware business 
under his father's supervision, and is 
quite competent to look after things 
successfully. 



ii a i; i) w a k !•: a N h m i: T a \. 



The Western Hardware Market Situation 

Summer Rush is at Its Height — Preserving Supplies Selling 
Strongly — No Price Changes Reported. 



Winnipeg, Julj (>. 1911.- — Conditions 
in ilit- hardware market show little dif- 
ference from last week. The summer 
rush is at its height, and orders continue 
to arrive in large batches. The holding 
of the Canadian Industrial Exhibition 
during the middle of this month will 
bring many travelers from .Manitoba 
and Saskatchewan into the city for a 
lew days at any rate, and consequently, 
those who intend coming in are doing 
a little extra work at the present time. 
One of the large wholesale houses at 
present is revising its catalogue, which, 
of course, has necessitated the return of 
all travelers, of that firm, to the city, 
and it is expected thai they will be in 
for a week or two at any rate. 

Business is reported to be good this 
week, wholesalers and retailers are com- 
menting on the fact that there has been 
no precept ible falling off yet of the de- 
mand in general lines. Harvest tools 
are still going out in large quantities. 
which include hay forks, straw forks, 
bailey forks, and section rivets. Season 
lines are also busy both for outside and 
inside use. Refrigerators, ice-cream 
freezers, as well as lawn mowers, and 
hammocks are still in great demand. 
Screens for windows and doors are sell- 
ing in small quantities, as the demand 
is now only for the newer houses that 
are being built throughout the West. 
Household goods are also strong this 
week, especially for preserving supplies. 
Westerners put down large quantities of 
fruit every year, and preserving kettles, 
sauce-pans, etc., are moving in large 
bulk. The demand continues to hold 
good also for all lines of heavy hardware 
There is a good movement and general 
strength prevails with reference to 
prices. Nails, bolts, barb wire, and 
chain are moving out very briskly. 
Orders for sporting goods are still ar- 
riving, although the heavy rush for these 
lines might be considered to be over. 
The hunting season is being taken into 
consideration by some retailers and a 
few scattered orders for guns and am- 
munition are arriving. 

Prices in all lines are steady, and no 
change whatever is reported this week: — 

Winnipeg Hardware Quotations. 

Axe Handles — Oval and octagon, s.g. 
hickory, $3 50; No. 1, $2.00; 2, $1.60; 
p.g. oak, $2.75. 

Auger Bits— "Irwin" bits, 47$ ; other 
lines 75 per cent. 

Bolts— Carriage, f and smaller, 65 ; 
7-16 and larger, 55 ; machine, $ and 
under, 60 and 5 ; 7-16 and over, 55 ; ma- 
chine set screws, 65 ; plough bolts, 50 ; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, 3 ; 
small lots, 1\ ; stove bolts 77*. 



Bar Iron— Bar Iron, $2.50 ; Swedish 
iron, $4.75 ; sleight shoe steel, $2.65 ; 
spring steel, $3.40 ; machinery steel, 
$3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 
lbs. $8.50 ; Jessop, $15 

Blocks — Steel, 45 ; wood 60 per cent. 

Cut Nails.— $3.15 per keg base. 

Copper— Planished copper, 30c per 
11) ; tinned, 24c. 

Crowbars — 4£c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc. — 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $1.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3. 24. 

Canada Plates— Firm. Half polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $3.65; 8-inch, $3.90; full 
polish, 6 and 7-inch. $4.40; 8-inch, $4.65. 

devices— 7ic per lb. 

Enamelware — Canada, 50; Imperial, 
60; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60 ; white 
70 and 5 ; diamond, 50 ; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files — American, 75 ; Black Diamond, 
60 ; Nicholson's, 65 per cent. 

Galvanized Iron.— Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18, $3.85, 20, $3.90; 22 and 24 
$4; 26, $4.20; 28, $4,60; 30 gauge or 
103,4 oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Iron Pipe.— § in., $3.50 ; \ 
in., $4; \ in., $5.20; 1 in., $7.00; l| 
in., $10.25; \\ in., $12.45; 2 in., $16.25. 

Galvanized Ware — Pails, 40 and 5 
p.c. Other galvanized lines, 37 1 /. p.c. 

Grindstones— Per 100 lbs., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron, No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2, and 
larger, $4.65; snowshoes, No. to No. 
1, $5.15; No. 2 and larger, $4.90; steel, 
No. to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, 
$5.10; featherweight, $6.50. 

Horse Nails — "M.R.M." cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 5, $2.75; 6 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.85; 9, $2.75; 10, 
11 and 12, $2.65 in 25-lb. boxes. 

Harvest Tools — 50, 5 and 5 p.c. 

Hinges — Light T and strap, 65 p.c. 

Hooks — Brush, heavy, per dozen, 
$7.75; grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers — Full box, 40 p.c. ; 
smaller lots, 35 p.c. 

Iron Pipe, Black— \ in., $3 ; \ in., $2.- 
45 ; f in., $2.50 ; £ in., $3.25 ; f in., 
$4 ; 1 in., $5.65 ; \\ in., $7.75 ; 1£ in., 
$9.25 ; 2 in., $12 ; 2i in., $19.60 ; 3 in., 
$25.75 ; 3-i in., $33.50 ; 4 in., $38.35 ; 44 
in., $44.10 ; 5 in., $50.40 ; 6 in., $65.10 ; 
7 in., $95.50 ; 8 in., $118. 

Logging Chain— \ in., $7.50 ; 5-16 in., 
$6 ; I in., $5.50. 

Lanterns — Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $9.75. 

Poultry netting — 57V 2 per cent. 

Pig Lead— $4.75. Lead Pipe— $5.25. 

Rivets and Burrs— Iron rivets, 55 per 
cent.; copper, No. 8, 30c; 10, 32c; 12, 
34c; copper burrs, No. 8, 40c ; 13, 43c; 
12, 46c; copper rivets and burrs, No. 8, 
31c ; 9, 32c ; 10, 33c ; coppered, No. 8, 
17c; 9, 1 7 Jc; 10, 18c. 

Rope — Sisal, 8c; pure manila, lOfc ; 
British manila, 8£c ; lath yarn, 9}c. 

Sheet Zinc — Casks, $8.75; broken 
lots, $9.50. 

50 



Steel Squares — 10 off new list. 

Shovels — Discounts on No. 1, No. 2. 
60 and 2\ p.c; No. 3, No. 4, 50 and 
2J p c; No. 1 scoops 50 and 6 p.c; all 
other grades, 45 and 5 p.c; fifty cents 
per dozen net is added to equalize casi- 
ern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $28 per cwt. 

Screws— Flat head iron, 80, 10, 10 
and 10; brass, 75; round head, iron, 
80 ; brass, 70 ; coach, 65 per cent. 

Stove Pipes— 25 and 2£ p.c 

Terne Plate— 1. C, $9.75; I. X., 
$11.75. 

Tin Plate— I. C, charcoal, 20 x 28, 
full box, $10.25; 4 box, $5.50; I. X., full 
box, $12.25; £ box, $6.50; I. X. X., full 
box, $14.25; 4 box, $7.50; 20 x 39, I. C, 
full box, $15.50; 4 box, $8.25; I. X., full 
box, $17.50; A box, $9.25. 

Tinware, Etc. — Pressed, retinned and 
plain, 75 and 2£; pieced, 25; japanned 
ware, 35. 

Wire— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.05 ; 
plain twist, $3.40 ; staples, $3 ; an- 
nealed wire, base, $3; oiled, 10c extra ; 
bright iron $3.20 base; brass spring wire, 
base 29c ; plain galvanized wire, Nos. 
6, 7 and 8, $3.40 ; No. 9, $2.90 ; 10, 
$3.50; No. 11, $3.55; No. 12, $3.10; 
No. 13, $3.25 ; No. 14, $3.95. 

Wire Nails— $2.90 Winnipeg, and $2.45 
Fort William. 

Wringers — Royal Canadian, $39.25; 
New Easy, $42.50. 

Paints and Oils. 

Much interest is being evinced at the 
present time in the flax crop situation. 
It is a recognized fact that the price of 
linseed oil has been too high this year 
to bring about heavy trading. This of 
course was brought about through the 
price of flax seed and consequently new 
conditions are being looked forward to. 

In February, 1911, the price of linseed 
oil in London, Eng., was £50 a ton. This 
was the highest price in 75 years. In 
1837 the price of linseed oil in London 
was £47 10s per ton, which was the next, 
highest during that period. The average 
for the 75 years was between £32 and 
£35 per ton. The period of the Crimean 
War 1854 and 1855 brought linseed oil 
to £45 10s per ton. This high price was 
due of course to the fact that the major- 
ity of the flax was then grown in the 
Balkan, thus in spite of that fact that 
no wars were prevailing to unsettle con- 
ditions, prices soared to a heighth during 
the last six months that has not been 
reached in previous history. There is 
little wonder therefore that the English 
oil buyers went out of the market this 
year, with the result that the trade has 
been suffering considerably. 

Regarding the flax seed itself it was 
at its highest point at the time of the 
Crimean War when it reached a heighth 
of $2.76 per bushel for the reason men- 
tioned above. The highest price at which 
a transaction took place on the Winni- 
peg Grain Exchange was $2.56 per bush- 
el, which price is considered by dealers 
Continued on Page 52.) 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Getting After the Autumn Paint Trade 

How a Progressive Dealer Canvassed all the Owners of New 
Houses in Town and Successfully Introduced a New Make of 
Paint — Send Out Literature. 



A great amount of paint will be used 
this fall on the new buildings now in 
course of construction. As there is 
every indication of a record-breaking 
building year, it naturally follows that 
the fall demand for paint will also set 
a new mark. 

The aggressive dealer will recognize 
that a splendid opportunity is thus pre- 
sented, and will lose no time in meeting 
it. This can best be done by getting in 
touch with the parties engaged in build- 
ing at the present time. 

It is recognized that the circulation of 
paint literature is a sure means of creat- 
ing an added interest in the subject and, 
ultimately, a bigger demand. Dealers 
often complain, however, that it is too 
difficult to "pick the field" properly: 
that their literature falls largely into 
the hands of people who could not, un- 
der any circumstances, be termed pros- 
pective customers and that it is very 
hard to determine who are, and Avho are 
not, good "prospects." At the present 
juncture, this difficulty does not present 
itself. By keeping watch on building 
operations, the dealer can find out every- 
one who is putting up a new building in 
the place and consequently he will have 
at his disposal a list comprised of none 
but sure users of paint. A new build- 
ing will certainly require paint and, if 
the dealer gets on the ground early, he 
will stand a splendid chance of persuad- 
ing the owner, architect or builder — who- 
ever has the last word in each case — 
that the work should be done with the 
particular make of paint that he sells. 

Send out Literature. 

It is a wise move, ■ therefore, to send 
out some form of literature, bearing on 
the paint question, mailing copies to the 
owner, architect and builder of each 
house in course of construction. To 
follow this up with a series of personal 
calls would be to clinch a good share of 
the business. A canvassing campaign 
would take considerable time but the re- 
sults would amply justify the means. 

The writer recalls a case in a western 
Ontario town where a hardwareman had 
stocked a new line of paint and had de- 
termined to push it for all he was worth. 
He believed, in the first place, that he 
was handling the best paint on earth — 



not as good as the best, or equal to 
the others, but the only real, simon 
pure "best" paint made. His enthusi- 
asm made it possible for him to convert 
others more readily than it would be 
for the half-hearted advocate, who was 
not convinced that he had something 
really better to offer than the other fel- 
low. But the paint was a new brand 
in that locality and the dealer was 
shrewd enough to see that he would have 
to fight hard to gain recognition for 'it. 
Through August and early September, 
he started to canvass hard for the new 
building trade. He called not only once. 



but several times, on each owner and he 
talked his make of paint so enthusias- 
tically and persistently that gradually 
they began to feel that it surely must 
be the only paint worth using. His per- 
sistency won. for him a great number of 
orders. The paint proved itself, being a 
high-grade paint, and the dealer found 
that in almost every case he made, not 
only a sale, but a permanent customer 
as well. 

It is aggressiveness of that stamp 
which builds up a paint connection and 
holds it intact. Good paint will sell it- 
self, declare some men. But good paint 
will never sell itself if it stays on the 
shelves. The good qualities of a splen- 
did make of paint have often been con- 
cealed under the dust that the dealer 
allowed to accumulate on his stock while 
inferior stuff was being sold all over 
town by his progressive rival. 



Making Good with the Small Specialties 

Many Small Lines Carry Big Profits — How They Help to Gain 
Women's Trade — Making an Appeal to the Home Lover — 
Exodus to Summer Cottages Gives Opportunity. 



The ingenuity, of paint and varnish 
manufacturers has produced, during the 
past few years a number of specialities 
done up in small packages, which have 
made a big hit with the public, wher- 
ever introduced. And they have proven 
most satisfactory to the hardwareman, 
as well, for they have carried a big 
profit, have been easy to sell by reas- 
on of the persistent advertising of the 
manufacturers. 

One of the specialties which one no- 
tices in a good proportion of hardware 
stores is a straw hat enamel, packed 
in small tins which are attractively ar- 
ranged on a display card, and there- 
fore, if placed on the counter or dis- 
play case, the cannot help but attract 
attention. 

This article has probably sold best in 
the smaller places, where their value in 
effecting;* an important economy, was in- 
stantly recognized. People found that, 
at very small expense, they could 
brighten up their last year's hats, and 
make them practically as good as new. 
Sales of this hat enamel are much in 
order just now, as the fierce sun of the 
past couple of months has faded every 
headpiece, and made it a prospect for 
a tin of straw hat enamel- Dealers 
who made good sales of this article in 
51 



the early spring when straw hats were 
making their first appearance, will do 
well to move their display card to a 
prominent place again. 

For Renovating Chairs. 

It is astonishing what can be done 
to renovate old kitchen chairs, anti- 
quated rockers and other pieces of fur- 
niture which appear to have seen their 
best days simply by the application of 
some of the numerous finishes which 
have been specially prepared by promin- 
ent paint manufacturers, for work of 
this kind. The writer has seen many 
instances of people who were about to 
discard some old chairs, but, being in- 
duced to try some of these chair fin- 
ishes, they surprised themselves by 
turning out an article as good as new. 

Porch chairs were among the articles 
which were most frequently treated in 
this way. Every verandah must have 
its quota of these resplendent pieces of 
furniture, and, being left out in the 
weather throughout the summer months 
they are naturally a little the worse 
for wear at the end of the season, and 
have to be fixed up a little before be- 
ing trotted out for the next campaign. 
These chair enamels have certainly fill- 
ed a need so far as porch chairs are 
concerned, amd the man on the street 



HARD W A R E A X 1) M I'.TA I. 



would find it difficult indeed to distin- 
guish the new from the renovated. 

Painting at the Summer Cottage. 

Jusl now tin- real exodus of summer 
cottagers is taking place. Many people 
who have felt like making for the lakes 
or mountains for a long time past, 
have remained at home and endured the 
heal because they had children writing 
on the examinations. These, however, 
are drawing to a close, and the last 
contingent of those .who are able to en- 
joy the hot weather at a watering 
place, are about to depart. 

Whi n they arrive at the cottage, they 
will find lots of things which need reno- 
vating, and, most of all, the verandah 
chairs. 

Everybody who has ever experienced 
life at a summer resort knows just 
how hard it is to purchase little neces- 
sities such as paint, glass, putty and 
number of other supplies which the 
hardwareman carries in stock. They 
would consider it a real favor if 
somebody could suggest some easy way 
by which they could procure these sup- 
plies. So, while we are talking about 
summer cottages, let us make the sug- 
gestion that hardwaremen should make 
it a point to inform those of his cus- 
tomers who intend going away that he 
can supply their wants in this line, 
sending up the goods so that they can 
be packed with the groceries and other 
supplies. Or, give them to understand 
that, if they discover, after their arri- 
val, that they need something in the 
hardware line, all they have to do is 
to drop a line to their own home deal- 
er, and he will see that the goods are 
sent to them promptly, and by the 
best route. 

Some of the large department stores 
in the cities make a specialty of sum- 
mer resort trade, and, by paying at- 
tention to just such details as are ap-, 
preciated by people at a distance from 
a base of supplies but able and willing 
to pay for service, their trade in this 
line is rapidly growing. 

Canoe Enamels, of Course. 

One of the first disappointments the 
summer resorter will encounter, will be 
furnished by his canoes and boats. Of 
course they will leak, and it will then 
occur to him that they must be paint- 
ed. Now, the real canoeist could not 
bear to put any covering upon his 
craft, except the well-tried enamel he 
has been in the habit of purchasing 
from the hardwareman at home. What 
is more natural than that he should at 
once communicate with the hardware- 
man at home and ask him to send up 
some of "the same kind as he used be- 



fore!" Of course this will be the most 
natural thing for him to do, if the 
hardwareman has convinced him that 
he will look after his mail orders pro- 
perly. 

Stencil Paints. 

Another small line which is increasing 

in popularity is stencil paints. The pre- 
sent is also a good time to push the sale 
of this article for the curtain and drap- 
eries of the summer home will also be 
requiring attention. There is no more 
economical or pleasing way to 
treat them than by the sten- 
ciling method, and the fact that 
there is considerable leisure around the 
summmjer home makes it more than like- 
ly that stenciling would be hailed as a 
fine diversion. 



scorched and the lower part of the build- 
ing was flooded with water. 

It is thought that the fire was due to 
spontaneous combustion. 



A GOOD FLAXSEED CROP. 

There is every indication of a good 
flaxseed crop, although the reports of 
drought conditions in South Dakota 
have acted somewhat as a damper of 
late. The state has been affected by 
the long continued dry weather and it 
is not now considered likely that the 
yield will equal early expectations. 

A promising feature is the excellent 
growth of flaxseed in North Dakota, 
which ordinarily produced the bulk of 
the crop. The Paint and Varnish Re- 
cord comments on conditions in North 
Dakota as follows: — 

"The serious calamity to last year's 
flaxseed crop was caused by the 
drought in North Dakota, and it is 
only by a heavy damage to the crop 
in this state that the shortage can be 
expected to be very pronounced. So 
long as North Dakota shows prospects 
for a good yield the conditions are 
more or less encouraging." 

Reports from the Canadian provinces 
are encouraging in tone. iRains have 
been fairly heavy and the weather, to 
date, has not been hot enough to cause 
any damage to the crop. 

Taking the conditions as a whole it 
is a reasonable assumption that the 
yield will be more favorable than last 
year. It is hard to say what the fu- 
ture holds out, however, and it is not 
possible to accurately gauge the ex- 
tent of the crop at this early stage. 



FIRE IN PAINT FACTORY. 

A fire broke out on Sunday in the 
Martin-Senour Paint Co. factory, at 
Montreal, starting on the fourth floor 
and spreading quickly to the storey 
above. The firemen succeeded in confin- 
ing the flames to the two upper storeys 
and finally got the blaze under control. 
The interior of the two floors was badly 



WESTERN HARDWARE MARKETS. 

(Continued from page 50) 
to be just about double the standard or 
normal price of flaxseed. One of the 
largest wholesalers in the city who is 
very closely in touch with the situation, 
stated that better profits could be ob- 
tained with flax selling at $1.25 per 
bushel, and linseed oil at 65c to 75c a 
gal. then at the prices which are pre- 
vailing to-day. This is because with oil 
at that price practically all that was 
manufactured could be disposed of, and 
consequently farmers could find a market 
for all grain, good, bad or indifferent, 
in proportion to the demand for the 
manufactured article. The situation 
this year is therefore a very complex 
one, and manufacturers of paint will 
certainly be called upon to use consider- 
able judgment in the disposing of their 
stocks. It is the opinion that some will 
undoubtedly come out with a deficit, 
while others state that if they make ex- 
penses they will be satisfied. 

The new crop is therefore looked for- 
ward to with much apprehension. The 
increased acreage in the three prairie 
provinces will, of course, naturally re- 
sult in an increased yield. One gentle- 
man who is closely in touch with the 
situation at the present time remarked 
that he expected to see a crop of three 
times the amount of last year. The 
acreage, he stated, had been practically 
doubled and rain had been general 
throughout the West so far. Therefore 
counting on good weather conditions for 
the next few weeks the yield of bushels 
per acre should be vastly increased over 
that received last year. 

In the trade, all lines continue steady, 
and everything is strong. The oil mills 
are shut down for the present, and not 
expected to be opened before the new 
crop arrives. Stocks are, however, of 
good size and for the present there is 
little doubt of a large decline. Prices 
remain as follows: — 

Turpentine. — 85c per gal. in barrels, 
and 95c in small lots. Linseed Oil. — 
$1.20 for raw, $1.23 for boiled. 

Petroleum and Gasolene. — Silver Star, 
in bbls., per gal., 15c; Sunlight, 18c ; 
Family Safety, 22£c; Searchlight, 20±c; 
Red Rose, 23£c; Keystone Special, 18c; 
Pemoline, in bulk, 19c; Silvertight, in 
bulk, 15c; Acme lamp, in bulk, 27c; 
White Rock, in bulk, 22£c ; National 
Light, in bulk, 21c; Engine Gasolene, 
24c; White Lily, 26c; Royal, 24c 



Mark Johnson, of Ackland and Son, 
Winnipeg, is visiting his parents at 
Stavner. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



3 PROFIT EARNERS 



For All 
Paint Dealers 



IYI 1L1 l Hint corned in a great assortment 
of shades, outdoor and interior finishes. Just 



M L FloOrglaZe is a floor finish, an 
. interior finish, an outdoor finish in one, and 
meets your market, and a customer can't make se lf-varnishing at that. Saves the buyer trouble. 

a mistake, because it's the easiest to use and J ^r^^_ ... „ , . c ■ u t u:~u „!„„ 

„ , , „ , , _ ^^r ^^ Makes a scratchless finish of high gloss, 

handle. You get the benefit and the profit ^^r fc* ^W 

Easiest to use and a great seller, well 

advertised by us. 



of handling a satisfactory paint of 
high quality. Sell poor paint — •> 



you get the blame. 



ELASTILITE 




VARNISH 



A varnish finish that won't mar easily, that brushes well, that gives a high 
surface in amateur hands. Dealers that sell it sell absolute satisfaction in every 
way as to finish. 

Get our Dealer Proposition, samples and color cards. 
Address nearest branch to you. 

IMPERIAL VARNISH AND COLOR CO., LIMITED 



108 Princess Street, 
WINNIPEG 



6 to 24 MORSE STREET, TORONTO 



524 Beatty Street, 
VANCOUVER 



^JjH-jft 




A Word 




to the Wise 




is sufficient. A word to you, Mr. Dealer, about 

MINERVA 

Paints and Varnishes 

should be the same thing. We assume that you have secured an enviable reputation 
by handling honest goods and by employing honest methods. Here's a new paint 
and varnish being manufactured in Canada. The Pinchin-Johnson Company, of 
London, England, have been manufacturing Minerva brand for 76 years. The qual- 
ity of their product is unquestioned. The ingredients of their paints and varnishes 
are the purest and best obtainable. The manufacturing process is scientific — the 
machinery in our big, new Canadian factory is thoroughly modern and up-to-date. 
Large railroad and steamship companies and prominent decorators all over the 
world use this brand. 

It's an attractive proposition for you from every side — reputation and profit. 
Make Minerva brand your headliner. Write to-day for information and dealers' 
price list. 

PINCHIN. JOHNSON & CO. (Canada), Limited 

Established in England in 1834. 377-387 Carlaw Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



53 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 7.— The price o! lin- 
seed oil and turpentine arc down again 
tins week although the last reduction is 
quite a small figure. It is hardly 
ftecessarj to sa\ that the weather has 
had some influence on business which 
like humanity wilted to a certain ex- 
tent under the heat waves. City trav- 
elers do not deny that in many cases 
retailers were not eager to talk busi- 
ness and they themselves were looking 
for the cool spots. On the whole busi- 
ness has been fair in spite of the heat. 
Last week it was stated that linseed 
oil showed a tendency to lower prices 
and the figures then quoted have been 
pared again. The downward tendency in 
the price of turps seems to be quite 
persistent. 

Linseed Oil— The demand is a little 
easier than has been noted of late. The 
quotations announced this week w r ere for 
raw $1.01, and for boiled $1.04. Judg- 
ing from the present demand the big 
bulk of the purchasing seems to be 
over for the present or is rather tem- 
porally quiet. There is still a great 
deal of work to be done and the de- 
mand for paints and paint necessaries is 
bound to be felt throughout the whole 
season. 

Turpentine— Turpentine does not seem 
to have put the brakes on yet and is 
following the downward tendency that 
has been noticeable of late. The local 
price is now 75c as compared with 7& 
last week. There is a feeling that tur- 
pentine has about reached a steady- 
basis, although it might be added that 
it was hardly thought that it would 
drop to the present level. 

Arsenate of Lead— Trade is quiet in 
arsenate of lead. The demand is light, 
hut it is fair enough for this time of 
the year, the majority of the dealers 
having secured their supplies. Prices 
are: In bbls., about 800 lbs., 9c; in half- 
bbls., about 400 lbs., 9Ac; in 25-rb. 
wooden kegs, 10c; 5-lb. bottles, 12c; in 
2-lb. bottles, 13c; in 1-lb. bottles, 14c. 

Paris Green.— Business has reached the 
small end just now and the retailer 
should he getting rid of his stocks. De- 
mand has not entirely disappeared, and 
it is still expected to he heard from 
for some time yet. Prices are as fol- 
lows:— In barrels, about 600 lbs., 17c per 
lb.; arsenic kegs, 250 lbs., 17ic; 50-lb. 
and 100-lb. drums, 18|c; 25-lb. and 100- 
1b. drums, 18fc; 1-lb. packets, 100 lbs. 
in case, 20ic per lb.; 1-lb. packets, 50 
lbs. in case, 20|c per lb.; i-lb. packets 
100 lbs. in case, 22Jc per lb.; 1-lb. tins, 
100 lbs. in case, 21^c per lb. 



Varnishes.— Trade in varnishes is fair- 
ly good and contributes largely to the 
present general . demand. Japans and 
shellacs are also moving satisfactorily. 

Putty— There is nothing new to re- 
port in this market which is steady and 
well maintained. Existing prices of 
putty are:— Bulk, bbls., $2.20; bulk, 
cwts., $2.45; bladder, bbls., $2.70; blad- 
der, cwts., $2.80; 25's, loose, $2.25; 
25's, cased, $2.70; 124's, cased, $2.90. 

White Lead. — Orders are fairly numer- 
ous and demand is steady. Prices are 
unchanged as follows: — Lots of one ton, 
$5.85; contracts of five tons and over, 
$5.70; shipments less than one ton, $6 
f.o.b. Montreal. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, July (i. — The amount of busi- 
ness done in paint and oils this week has 
not slackened up at all as a result of 
the heat. Local manufacturers and job- 
bers say they are busier than ever. It is 
probable that outside work was suspend- 
ed for some days but this has had no 
appreciable effect so far on the demand. 

There is an unusually steady tone to 
the market. For the first time in some 
weeks, both turpentine and linseed oil 
have been steady, a most unusual state 
of affairs in view of the spectacular per- 
formances of both these commodities 
since the first of the year. 

Linseed Oil.— The market has expe- 
rienced very little change in the last 
week. The situation elsewhere is prac- 
tically the same. While the market re- 
mains rather dull in Great Britain, the 
quotations for present delivery do not in- 
dicate any great reduction in price. All 
sales here are being made now for im- 
mediate needs largely and, as the Can- 
adian producers have light stocks, it is 
a reasonable assumption that the present 
quotations will not be materially altered 
for some time. 

Raw oil is quoted at $1.05, and boiled 
at $1.08. 

Turpentine.— Turpentine has "touched 
bottom." All agree on that score now. 
Selling at 75 cents, it is quite normal ; 
in fact, that price is declared to be low- 
er than local jobbers should quote but 
keen competition here has kept the fig- 
ure down. "The price for single barrel 
lots," Explains one jobber, "has been put 
down to a point at which jobbers have 
only a very ordinary margin of profit, 
which hardly pays them to cover the 
amount of leakage that must necessarily 
take place during the hot weather." 

The turpentine market at Savannah 
and Jacksonville has been a little erra- 
tic during the past two weeks. A light 
accumulation of stock has taken place, 
but the price tendency is all toward 
firmness. 

r>4 



Rosin.— In rosin a very considerable 
reduction has taken place in the com- 
mons. This may even be reduced further 
as the soap manufacturers, who use 
many barrels in the year have now 
adopted the finer grades of rosin for 
their use. This will likely leave the 
dark rosins to receive very little call 
and a further reduction may be looked 
for. 

Putty.— There is a steady call for all 
grades, prices standing firm. Standard 
putty is quoted at : Bulk, in casks, 
$2.20 ; in 100-lb. drums, $2.25 ; in 25-lb. 
drums, $2.65 ; bladder, in barrels, $2.75. 
Pure putty prices remain the same ; bulk 
in casks, $2.50 ; in 100-lb. drums, $2.80 ; 
in 25-lb. drums, $2.29 ; bladder, in bar- 
rels, $3, 

White Lead. — There is a heavy con- 
sumption of white lead with lots of good, 
business is sight. Outside work has 
now reached the stage where painting 
can be proceeded with and the painting 
fraternity are therefore ordering lead in 
good bulk. 

Prepared Paints. — The extreme heat 
had some little effect on the sale of pre- 
pared paints. Several houses report 
that their travelers found it difficult to 
business with dealers during the early 
part of the week on that account. Busi- 
ness from other sources kept the demand 
well up to the average, however. 

Varnishes and Japans.— Conditions re- 
main good. There is a brisk trade, with 
a marked tendency to favor the best 
grades. Quality is in demand more than 
ever before. 

Glass.— Import orders are being placed 
in promising bulk. The demand from the 
trade is growing. 

Petroleum.— There is a steady demand. 
Prices remain at : Canadian prime 
white, 12c ; United States water white, 
134c ; Fratt's Astral, 154c 



GOT WHAT HE WANTED. 

"Please, sir," piped the tiny custom- 
er, whose head scarcely reached the 
counter, "father wants some oak varn- 
ish." "How much does your father 
want, my little man? "asked the shop- 
man. "Father says, will you fill this?" 
said the little fellow, handing him over 
a half-gallon can. It was duly filled 
and handed over. "Father will pay you 
on Saturday," said the recipient, casu- 
ally. And then the face of the shopman 
grew dark. "We don't give credit here,:' 
he said. "Gimme back the can." Meek- 
ly the little lad handed back the' can, 
which was emptied, and handed back to 
him with a scowl. "Thank you sir," he 
said. " Father said you'd be sure to 
leave enough in the can, round the sides 
for him to finish the job he wants to 
do and I think you 'ave, sir." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




' Suggestion Book "—A twenty-four page booklet of fine-colored prints of harmonious color schemes for interiors and exteriors. 



CJ The mission of paint is to beautify and protect. 

<]J The mission of the "Suggestion Book" is to meet the request 
made of us by customers all over the Dominion for suggestions for 
harmonious color combinations. 

IJ This book enables agents for B.-H. "English" Paint to advise 
their customers regarding colors for home decorations and to show 
prospective customers how various color combinations would appear 
on buildings of different architectural designs. 

<fl Any enterprising merchant anywhere will have a permanent 
profitable paint department with B.-H. " English " Paint and B.-H. 
selling helps. 

<J If there is no B.-H. " English" Paint agency in your town, write 
our nearest office. 




55 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



TheM prices are for such qualities and Sleigh ihoe steel 1 90 

unities as are usually ordered by retail Iron finish oiaobiuery steel 

.i». .„, the us.ml termi "f credit, the (domestic) _ . . ......... 1 »s 



quantities 

UWeaUururea being foi larger quantities »nd Iron finish steel (foreign) 
prompt pay Large cash , buyei^can he- Reeled machinery steel 



2 25 
2 85 
2 00 

KSt^Uuixioiu to be informed 'at onoe ol Sheet oast steel 15 

4i,y apparent errors In this list, as the desire Toe calk steel 2 85 

Is to make it perfectly accurate. Retailers Mining cast steel 07| 

desiring to get in touofa with tirnia selling any High speed ... 65 

articles on which quotations are made can do Capital tool steel U W •••• 

so by writ ing the editor. Oammell Laird 15 

U U m.mnn^ t/tn atoA 08 08 



2 15 

2 15 
2 25 
5 00 
2 35 
15 
2 B) 
08 
65 



08 



METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS 

ANTIMONY. 

.Cookson's or HaUetfs, per lb.... 8 25 8 25 

BABBIT METAL 

12 

Canada Metal Oompany-WrluUenulne 14 « 2 20 

o imperial Tough. 5 V>.; White Brass, 35c 7 * «> 



08 
05J 
05 



25o, 
15c; Star 
9c; No. 4; 



BOo ; Imperial Tough, 5 

Metallic. 35c; Harris Heavy Pressure 

Hercules, 25c; White Bronze, 

FrictionleBB 10c; Alluminoid, 

6o. per lb. 

Metal Co. — Magnolia, 25c. 
Mystic, 17c. ; Kosmic, 15c 



Magnolia 
Defender, 20c 



Black Diamond tool steel ... . 08 

Corona tool steel 06% 

Silver tool steel 12% 

GOLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

9-16 to 11-16 Inch 

!tol7-16 " 

17-16W3 " 

Montreal, 25 and 2. Toronto, 30. 

BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal Toronto 

lOgaoge 2 30 2 50 

13* •• 230 2 55 

2 35 
2 45 
2 45 
2 45 
2 55 
2 55 
2 65 
2 80 



Machinery oast scrap, No.l 16 00 14 50 

Stove plate 12 50 13 0U 

MalleaDle 9 00 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel 5 00 6 HO 

Old rubber* 09 084 

LEAD. 

Montreal Toronto 

Domestic (Trail) pig, 100 lb 3 60 3 75 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 3 75 3 75 

Bar pig, per 10U lb 4 15 4 25 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll. .. 4 50 5 00 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. ft 4 25 4 75 

Cut sheets Jc per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size, Jc. per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE 

Lead Pipe and Waste, 30 p.o. 
Caulking lead, 4Jo. per pound. 
Traps and bends, 50 per oent. 

holder. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 24J n 26* 

Wiping 22 24 



2 20 
2 20 
2 25 
2 25 
2 35 
2 40 



SHKET ZINC. 



5-CWL. OttSKS . 

Part oasKH. . . 



7 E0 

8 00 



7 50 

8 0J 



BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 

Montreal. Toronto 
Plates, i to, Inch, per 100 lb.. 2 20 

Heads, per 100 lb... 2 45 

Tank plates.J-16 inch. „._£. . . 2 30 

8 25 



Tubes per 100 feet, 14 Inch 
,1 •■ j 



2| .. 

3 " 

34 ■; 

4 

BRASS. 



10 50 
12 00 
15 00 
19 25 



1 20 
2 45 
2 40 
9 00 
8 50 
10 00 
12 10 
15 30 
19 45 



Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge 

Rods, base Vi to 1 inch, round .... 

Tubing, seamless base, per lb 

Tubing, Iron pipe size, 1 inoh base.. 
Oopper tubing, 4 oente extra. 

BRASS OOODS, VALVES, ETC. 



22 
21 
25 
23 



CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 90 

All bright, 52 sheets 3 70 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 

20x28x80 8 90 

9 40 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRUGATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 " " 5 00 

26 " " 3 85 

28 " " 3 65 

Less 10 p.c. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 

B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon 

Head de-Lis 
3 60 3 35 

3 65 3 40 

4 05 3 80 
4 25 4 00 

Oolborne Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.75, 4.00. 

Less than case lots 10 cents per hd. extra. 
'Comet" sheets — 

22 

24 



gauge 

16-20.... 

22-24.... 

26 

28.. 



4 70 
8 90 
940 



Crown 
3 60 

3 65 

4 05 
4 25 



2 90 
4 00 



4 60 

8 70 

9 20 



Gorbal's 
Best 
3 60 

3 65 

4 05 
4 25 



SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb 6 CO 

TIN AND TINPLATES 



Lamb and Flag and Straits— 
56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. 



$48 00 49 00 



og 

Apolio brand— Montreal 

24 gauge, American 3 60 

26 " " 3 85 

28 " (26 English). 4 10 

10J oz. , equal to 28 English 4 35 

IRON PIPE. 

Size (per 100 ft.) Black. 



. 3 65 
. 3 70 
. 3 75 
. 4 00 
Toronto 
3 45 
3 50 

3 95 

4 25 



j inch 2 03 

2 25 

2 63 

3 28 

4 70 

6 41 

7 70 
9 57 

16 39 
21 52 
27 08 
30 78 



inch 



Groundwork, 65 p.c 

Standard Compression work, t>5 p.c. 

High grade compression work, 60 p.c. 

Cushion work, 55 per cent. 

Hellerwork, 70 p.c; No. 0, 75 p.c, and 1 and 2 

jisin cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 65 

p.cjroundway, 60 p.c 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Chech valves, 55 

p.c; Standard, 65 p.c 
J M T Radiator ValveB, 60 ; Standard, o5 , 

patent quick-opening valves, 70 and 10 p.c. 
Kerr extra, standard, globes, »ngles and 

checks, 60 p.c. ... «,i .. 

Kerr Jenkins' disc, standard valves, 624 p.c 
Kerr copper alloy disc standard globe, angle 

and check valves, 624 p.c. 
Kerr standard radiator diBC valves, 65 and 10 

p.c; Jenkins disc and quick opening hot 
water radiator valves, 75 p.c 
Kerr Weber l.B.B.M. straightway and water 

ga te valves, screwed and flanged, 624 and 

Kerr N.P. Union Elbows, 75 p.c. 

fe e n r ki^LreBlQuotaUons 5 on C anpUcatlon stan"da7dtash~ng;"fo;-headers7 e 60; flanged 

J *o Jenkins Bros. Montref unions. 65 ; malleable bushinga, 65 J nipples, 

o .lenaiua *»«° 75 an(J 1Q . maUeab i ei lipped uniors, 65 



Galvanized 

2 86 

3 08 

3 48 

4 43 

6 35 

8 66 

10 40 

13 86 

22 14 

29 U7 

36 58 

... 41 58 



Redipped Charcoal Plates— Tinned 
MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) Per box 

I C, 14x20 base 3/00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X. 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Murex Grades— 

!C,l4x20base 5 00 

IX, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best" — Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

10, 14x20 base 7 00 7 00 

IX, 14x20 baBe 8 25 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 9 50 

"' Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

I o, 14x20 base 4 50 

I X, 14x20 base 5 25 

I XX, 14x20 base 6 00 

Bright Cokes 
BeBsemer Steel — 

10, 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheeta 7 50 

I X, Terne Tin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 

Cookley Grade— 

XX, 14x56, 50 sheet bxa.-l 
" 14x60, " } .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " J 



GALVANIZED WIRE 

From stock, f.o.b Montreal — 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5, $2.80; 6, 7, 8, 82.75; 9, $2.30; 
10, $280; 11, $2.S5; 12. $2.45: 13, $2.55; 
14, $3.15. In car lots straight or mixed. 

POULTRY NETTING. 

3-ln. mesh, 19 w. g., 60 and 24 p.c off. Other 

sizes, 60 and 5 p.c off 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per cent. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.35 base ; No. 10 gauge, 6c 
extra; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra; No. 12 gauge, 
20c. extra; No. 13 gauge, 30c extra; No. 14 
gauge, 40e. extra ; No. 15 gauge, 55c. extra ; 
No. 16 garge, 70c. extra. Add 60c. for copper- 
ing and $2 fc> tinning 

Extra net per 100 lb. — OUed wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c, 
charooal (extra qualityl $1.25, packed In oasks 
or oases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, In 25-lb. bundles 
15o., in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in Mb 
hanks, 50c, in 4-lb. hank* 75c, In lib. 
hanks SI. 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolla, $1.65 per 
100 aq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolla, $1.70 per 100 aq. ft. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 45 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 75 

Oar lots and lesB. 
Dominion special field fencing, 334 p.c. small 

lots; extra 5 p.c. 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

WIRE ROPE 

Galvanized, 1st grade, 6 strandB, 24 wirea, |, 
$5 ; 1 inch, $16.80. 

Black. 1st grade, 6 strands, 19 wires, |, $5 

inch, $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. Toronto. 

WROUGHT STAPLES 

Galvanized 2 85 

Plain 2 60 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 

BARN PAINT 

In barrela, 1-gal. tina ." 80 85 

In barrels, 5-gal. tina 80 85 



Tinned Sheets. 

2x30 up to 24 gauge, case lots 

" " 26 " 



7 75 



IRON PIPE FITTINGS. 

Canadian malleable, 40; cast iron, 



Per lb. 



40 



7 35 
7 85 



OOPPER 

Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot 13 75 13 25 

Out lengths, round bars, 4 to 2 In. . 2100 

Plainsheet«,14oz.,14x48",14x60".. 23 00 

Copper Bheet, tinned, 14x60, 14 oz.. 20 50 

Copper Bheet, planished, 14x60, base 28 00 

Braziers', in sheets, 6x4 23 00 

OOPPER AND BRASS WJBE 
Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 624 P-c. 

IRON AND STEEL 

In car lots. Montreal Toronto. 

Canadian foundry, No. 1 

" No. 2 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig ir o . . ».' 25 
Summerlee, No. 2 " . . »• (X) 

Oarron .special »» 00 

Carron.soft r5 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 75 

Olarenoe, No. S 18 00 

Jarrow " '» 

Glengarnock...... . 

Radnor, oharcoal iron 32 00 

Ayresome.No. 3 18 15 

Ferro Nickel pig iron (Soo) 25 00 

Steel billets, Bessemer or open 

hearth, f.o.b. Pittsburg 

Angles base 2 50 

Common bar, per 100 lb. 190 

Forged Iron I 05 

Refined " . J « 

Horseshoe Iron « ij> 

Mild steel » s 



19 00 
19 00 
22 50 



20 50 
20 75 
20 50 
22 50 
32 50 



27 50 
2 50 
2 05 
2 26 
2 30 
2 30 
2 15 



SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 inch, 
70 and 10; 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c 

Light pipe, 60 and 10 p.c; fittings, 70 and 
10 p.c. 

RANGE BOILERS 

30-gallon, Standard, $4.75; extra heavy, $7.00 

KITCHEN SINES 

Cast iron, 16x24, $1 ; 18x30, $1.15; 18x36, $1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 15 x 24, $2; 18 x 30, 
$2.35: 18 x 36, $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS. 

Gas ranges, 50 per cent 

Stoves and Ranges— 45 to 55 per oent. 

Furnaces— 45 per cent. 

Registers— 70 to 75 per oent. 

Hot Water Boilere— 50 and 10 per oent. 

Hot Water Radiators— 50 and 10 per cent. 

Steam Radiators— 50 10 and 24 per cent 

Wall Radiatore— 50 and 10 p.o. 

Specials— 25 p.o. 

OLD MATERIAL 

Dealera buying prices: 

Montreal 
Heavy oopper and wire, lb. 11 

Light oopper bottoms 09 

Heavy red brasa 10 

" yellow brasa 08 

Lightbrass 06 

Tealead 024 

Heavy lead 02! 

Scran zino 03 

No. 1 wrought Iron 12 50 



Toronto 
111 
091 
10} 
084 
064 
024 
02J 
04 
10 00 



WIRE 

ANNEALED OCT HAY BAILING WIRE. 

No. 10, »3,80; No. 11, $3.9'); No. 12 and 13, 
$4; No. 134. 84.10; No. 14, $4.25; No. 15, $4.50; 
inlenghts6" to 11", discount 30 per cent.; 
other lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra ; if eye or 
loop on end add 25o per 100 lba. to the above. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

No 7 wire sobd line. No. 17, $4 90; No- 
18, S3; No. 19, $2,70; 6 wire aolid line, No- 

17, $4.45; No. 18, $3 10; No 19, $2 80 Al. 
prices per 1000 ft. measure; 6 strand. No. 

18, $2.60; No. 19, $2.90 F.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal, London. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9, $2.45 in cars f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. In 
10 0-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18, $5.50; No, 

19, $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, $7; No. 22. 
$7 3o; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24, $8; No. 25, 
$9; No 26, $9.50; No. 27, $10; No. 28, $11; 
No. 29, $12; No. 30, $13; No. 31, $14; No. 
32, $15; No. 33, $16; No. 34, $17. Extras net. 
Tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos 26-3i, $4; 
Nos 30-34, $6 Coppered, 75c ; oiling, 10c; 
in 25-lb. bundles, 15c ; in 5 and 10-lb bundles, 
25c ; in 1-lb. hanks, 25c ; in 4-lb hanks, 38c. ; 
in i-lb. hanks, 50c ; packed in casks or cases, 
15c ; bagging or papering, 10c. 

HAT WIRE IN OOIL8. 

$2.35 bate f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, Ham- 
ilton and London. 



CHEMICALS 

In casks per lb 

Sulphate of copper (blueatone) 07 

Litharge, ground 05 

flaked 05} 

Green copperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of Lead 09 

COLORS IN OIL 

Venetian red, 1-lb tins pure — 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Golden ochre, pure 11 

French ochre, pure 09 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure 15 

Signwriters' black, pure 17 

Marine black , 25 lb irons 05 

ENAMELS 

Per gallon in quart tins. 
M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & C. 

Co 1 80 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 4 50 

GLUE 

French medal 10 

German common Bheet 10 

German prima 015 

White pigsfoot 15 20 

Brantford medal 10 

" golden medal 11 

" brown sheet 10 

" golden aheet 13 

" gelatine 22 

" white gelatine 20 

" white glue 12 

" lOOflake 10 11 

Perfectipn amber ground, No. 1230 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 
Brantford all-round glue, i-lb. packages, 10c; 
4-lb., 15c; 1-lb., 25c Discount. 



PARIS GREEN. 

Montreal 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 18: 

Packets, 1-lb. , 100 in caae 

" i-lb., 
Tins, 1-lb., 100 in case 

PARIS WHITE 

In bbl» 90 



Montreal 

181 

3 20{ 

221 

2l| 



Toronto 
181 
201 
221 
2l| 



PIGMENTS. 

Orange Mineral, oaaks 

" 100-lb. kegs.. 



09 
094 



PREPARED PAINTS. 



Per gallon in qt. tine 

Sherwin-Williams paints, base ... 2 00 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 1 75 2 00 

Globe house paint (WindBor) . 160 

"New Era" house paint (Windsor). 1 85 

Henj. Moore Co. '8 "Egyptian" Brd 1 51 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.C 1 65 

Brandram-Henderson's "English " 1 95 

Ramsay's paints, pure 1 60 

Ramsay's paints. Thistle 1 30 

Martin- -enour, 100 p.c. pure 2 00 

Sen ours floor pain's 160 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. v. & C. Co) 1 90 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





BOECKH'S "STEEL 
GRIP" BRUSHES 

Comprise the following lines — 
Air A T O In Black and White Bristles, for Paint and Var- 

FL AX PAINTS In Black and White Bristles 

FLAT VARNISH In Black and White Bristles. 

T7T1SIT7 T3"QTTQWFTQ In Badger Hair, Fitch Hair* 
r UN Hf DRU OXllJyO etc., for Finishing work. 

Name and Design Registered 1909. Patented 1910. 
Write for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List. 

The Boeckh Bros. Company, Ltd. 

HEAD OFFICE — TORONTO 



This cut is repro- 
duced from a photo- 
graph of a Bowser 
System installed for 
Geo. W. Eccles.tone. 
Bracebridge, 
Ontario. 

We will reproduce 
another installation 
in the next issue of 
this magazine. 




This system 
handles 

Boiled Linseed 

Raw Linseed 

Turpentine 

Machine 

Engine 

Castor 

Cylinder 

Separator 

Gas Engine and 

Fly Oil 

No evaporation 
nor waste. 



A Profitable Way to Handle Paint Oils 

Do you know that paint oils can be handled without waste ? The Bowser System does away with measures and funnels. They 
measure the oil, count the gallons pumped and show the money charged for it. 

They put every cent of paint oil profit in your pocket. They are safe, space saving, clean and profitable. They buy themselves by 
their saving. Don't spend your money, invest it in a Bowser. Ask for catalogue No. 1 N, it's FREE. 

S. F. BOWSER <& CO., LTD., 66-68 Fraser Ave., TORONTO 



i)l 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



1-1 ANTIK OF PARIS 



Per barrel. 



Half i'">t tine, per dozen. 



i 30 



60 



Plaln.lnbbls ? ]° 

Gliders bolted In barrels 100 



' UIX *- Standard. 

2 20 

Bulk In casks i B « 

■• 100-lb.drumi S 22 

Bladders fa bbls " ,0 



RED DRY LEAD. 

Oennlne, 560 lb. casks, per owt 4 75 
tlenulne. 100 lb. keg., 5 25 

No. 1, casks, per 100 lbs 4 25 

No. 1, keg». perlOOlbe 4 75 

8HINOLB STAINS. 
In 5-galljn buokets 



4 75 

5 25 
4 25- 
4 75 



C 76 



TURPENTINE AND OIL. 

Montreal Toronto 



08 



Can. Prime white petroleum gal 

U 8. Water white 

U.S. Pratt s antral 

Castor oil. per lb., In bbl »- :„ ' ■ 

Motor Oaeollne single bbls 

Benzine, per gal single bblB .... 
Pure Turpentine single barrelB 7b 

Wood Turpentine . - 

Turpentine, second run • • • " 



U 12 
13) 
15) 

II'.! 

o m 

151 

78 
80 



Lin»eed Oil. 



bollerl 1 36 



Roein. "G" grade, bbl. lots, 100 lbs. 



1 10 
3 25 



VARNISHES 



Per gaL oam. 

an^stta;^-:::::::::::. :::: i» 



Pale durable body 
hard rubbing 



S 00 
S 00 



Finest elastlo gearing » 

Elastic Oak...... £ go 

Furniture, polishing ' "! 

T. I...... artrft 1ZU 



Furniture, extra 

» No. 1. 

•• onion. 



95 

90 

1 35 



Light oil finish * gg 

n~i* .1.. Untn . •■•• 3UU 



Gold size Japan 
Turps brown Japan 
No. 1 brown Japan 



1 60 
1 10 

95 
75 



26 to 40 
41 to 50 
51 to 60 
61 to 70 
71 to 80 
81 to 85 

86to90 

91 to 95 

96 fr.100 , , 

Toronto, 30 p.o. to 30 and 5 p.c, 



4 65 

6 10 

5 35 

5 75 

6 25 

7 00 



HARDWARE 



11 50 
18 JO 



Carpenters', per doi 

Plain ship, " 

AXES AND HATCHETS 

Single bit, per doz 6 00 

Double bit " 10 00 

Bench Axes 6 75 

Broad Axes 22 75 

Hunters' Axes BOO 

'Boys' Axes 5 75 

Lathing hatchets 4 70 

Shingle " } « 

Olaw ■ 170 

Barrell . " 5 60 



14 00 
22 00 



9 00 
12 00 
10 00 
25 00 

6 00 
6 50 

10 00 
6 75 

5 00 

6 85 



faylor-Forbes, prospector! 051 

Buckworth, per lb u ,u * 

AMMUNITION 

"Dominion" Rim Fire irtridges ami 
C! B caps, 50, 10& %t p.c: H.B. caps, 5v, 10 ami 

Si p.o.; C 



ntre Fire Pistol Cartridges, 25 and 
*"po.; Centre Fire Sporting ami Military 
Cartridges, 10 and 10 p c ; Primers, 10 and 24 
pc • Br ass Shot Shells, 45 and 12) p.c; shot 
( 'art ridges, discount earns as ball cartridges, 
f.o.li. any jobbing point east of Manitoba. 

"Crown"* Black Powder. 30 and 10 p.c.; 
" Sovereign" Bulk Smokeless Powder, 30 and 
10p.c; " Regal" Dense Smokeless Powder, 30 
and 10 p.c; " Imperial" Shells, both Bulk and 
Dense Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c. 
Empty Shells, 30 and 10 p.c. 90 days net. 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Slater's paper, per roll 70 

O. K. paper. No. 1, per roll 76 

O. K. paper, No. 2, per roll 70 

Plain Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. roll . . . . 45 
Plain Fibre, No. 2, " .. • • 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. roll. . . 55 
Tarred Fibre. No. 2, " .. 35 

Tarred Fibre Cyclone, 25 lb., per roll 65 

Dry Cyclone, 151bs 46 

Plain Surprise, per roll 40 

Resin sized Fibre, per roll. . . .... ... . . 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 lbs.. 4 00 
Heavy straw, plain & tarred, per ton 37 50 
Carpet Felt, per 100 lbs. . . . ...... ... 2 50 

Tarredwooi roofing felt, per 100 lb... 1 80 
Pitch, Boston or Sydney, per 100 lbs 70 

Pltoh, Sootoh, per 100 lbs 65 

Heavy Fibre, 32' * 60', per 100 lbs. . . . 3 00 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per square 70 

j • " " .... 95 

2 Ply oomplete. per roll } 15 

« ' ' " 1 35 

Llauld Roofing Cement, brls., per gal 15 

" tins " 0?" 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Refined Oval Tar, tins, per do/. 1 25 

Refined Coal Tar, per barrel 4 50 

Shingle varnish, per barrel 4 50 

Cape. Per lb 08 

Nails, per lb 05 

Mop cotton, per lb 15 



Plated, bower barff & nickel, No. 241, 45 p. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. off revised list 
Cast iron loose pin, 60 p.c. 
Wrought steel fast joint an loose pin, 70 p.c. 
Crescent brands, 70 per cent 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK 
Canadian Portland, bags per bbl 1 55 1 70 



Ordinary drop shot, AAA to dust J 17.60 per whlte Br0 , En gi lB h t 00 J 05 



2 

2 25 



Baking black Japan » 

No. 1 black Japan » 

Benzine black Japan » '" 

OrystalDamar j jg 

No. 1 »••• • 1 Afl 

Pure asphaltum }« 

Oilcloth i £ 

Lightning dryer » ». 

Elastllite varnish * f 

Granltineloorfialsh.... •••••• 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish . 
Canada Paint Go's sun vamlsb . . . 

" Kyanlze" Interior Finish » «j 

■' Flint-Lao," ooach * J? 

B.H. Cos " Gold Medal," In oases 2 50 

Flattine fioor finish \ ™ 

Elantloa exterior flnlph »* 

Stovepipe varnish, \ pints P?r gross 8 00 
Pure white shellac varnish, in barrels 1 75 

Pure orange „ 1 tj 

No. 1 orange 

WINDOW GLASS 

Size United 

Inches. 8 «r 

Under26 8} 25 



100 lbs. Discount 25 per oent ; cash dlsoount. 
2 per oent, 30 days ; net extras as foUows 
subjeot to cash discount only i Chilled, 40 o, 
buck and seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, 81 20, per 100 
lbs.: bags less than 25 lbs., fc). per lb.; F.O.B. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax, freight equalized. 

AUGERS AND BITS 

Ford's auger bits fn" 14 10 

Irwin's auger *** 

Gilmour's auger <*> 

Rockford auger 50 and 10 

Gilmour's car 47* 

Clark's expansive *" 

Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 

BARN DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs 



Laf arge " oement In wood 3 40 

Fire brlok, Sootoh. per 1,000 .... S3 00 ?8 00 

" English 17 00 2100 

" Amerloan, low 23 00 25 00 

•• " high 27 50 35 00 

Fire olay (Sootoh), net ton 5 50 

OHALK AND PENCILS 
Carpenters Colored, per gross.. 65 80 
lead pencils, per grs 2 40 6 75 

CHISELS. 

Cold chisels, 5x61n.,doz 2 20 

Bevel edge, 1 inch, doz * <*> 



BAVETROUOBS. 

8 Inch In 100 foot lengths 2 90 

10 •• " " 3 15 

lj ■• " " 3 68 

16 6 25 

Add extra 10c per 100 ft. O.G. Round Bead 
Trough. 

FACTORY MILK CAMS. 

Milk cans and palls, 40 p.o. 
Hand delivery and oreamery oans, 40 p.o. 
Railroad and oream oans and taps, 45 p.o. 
Oreamery trimmings, 75 and 121 P-o. 

FAUOBTB. 

Common, oork-ltned, 36 per oent. 

FARRIER KNIVES 

Buckworth, 50 p.o. 

FILEB AND RASPS. 

Per cent 

Disston's 70 and 10 

Great Western, American 70 and 10 

Kearney & Foot, Arcade 70 and 10 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 70 and 10 

McCleUan, Globe 70 and 10 

Blaok Diamond 60 and 10 

DeltaFiles 60 

Nicholson 62? 

Jowett's (English list) 27) 

FORGES 

Blacksmiths portable, 135 lbs 9 86 

GALVANIZED WARE 

Duff erin pattern pails, 50 per cent 
Flaring pattern, 50 per cent 
Galvanized washtubs, 45 per cent 

GRINDSTONES 
Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 lbs. 1 
Smaller sizes extra. 

HAMMERS. 

Tack, Iron, doz 35 

Ladies olaw, handled, doz 60 

Adze eye nail hammer, 10 oz , doz. ... 1 26 

" hickory handle, 1 lb., doz.. 6 85 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz.... 7 00 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz. , doz 6 60 

Tinners setting, ) lb., doz 4 50 

Machinists, ) lb. , doz 3 20 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs. and over 06 

Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over 08 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 09 

HiilVIHT TOOLS. 

50 auu 5 per oent. 

Sidewalk and stable iorapers, net, $2.25. 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per oent. 
Lawn rakes, net. 

HALTERS 
Jute Rope, |-lnoh. . . .per gross 



00 
9 00 
6 00 
11 00 
6 00 
6 50 
6 45 
6 40 
6 25 



Donble 
Diamond 
$ 6 25 

6 75 

7 50 

8 50 

9 75 
11 00 
13 60 
15 00 
17 50 
20 50 



Stearns wood track 4 50 

Zenith • ■•_- 

Atlas, steel covered » "0 

Perfect 8 u0 

New Milo, flexible 

Double straphangers, doz. set3 

Standard jointed hangers, 

Steel King hangers 

Storm King and safety hangers .... 

Storm King rail * £| 

Crown * °£ 

Crescent ° »" 

Sovereign ' i0 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 

Hangers, 5 per cent. 
Steel, track, 1 x3-16in. (100 ft.).... 3 25 



BARN DOOR LATCHES 

Challenge, dozen 2 25 

Defianoe, dozen * '£ 

Gem dozen » 80 



CHAIN 

Proof coll, per 100 lb., i to., $6.00; 5-16 In, 
$4.85;»in., $4.25; 7-16 in., 84.00; J in., $3.75, 
9-16 fa* 83.70 ; i in.. $3.65 ; I in., J3.60 ; 1 In.. 
83.45; 1 in., 83.40. 



be Rope, l-lno 



9 00 

10 00 

11 00 
400 
6 SO 
S SO 



Leather, 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1 J " " 

Web 

HINGES 
,, Blind, dlsoount 50 per oent. 
.ro^Ja^k B ch1.C^»r«); cow ties, 40 Heavy. T and strap, 4-ln 100 lb. net. . 7 25 

halter chains, 50 and 5; tie outB, 75; coil 5-ln. » 7 

ohain, 50 and 5; hammock ohains, galvan- n |( o-jn., 

Ized,35and5. „ „ lo-lni'and larger" 

churns. . Light T and strap, dlsoount 65 P.O. 



6 75 
6 50 
6 25 



No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10 , No. 3, 8 h k d hlnge _ 

; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto „„„„, , a n ■ 



Hamilton, Yondon and St. Marys, 40 
per cent.; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 37) and 10 per oent. 

CLAMPS 

Malleable Bwivel head, 4 In 2 50 

adjustable, 4 In 7 JO 

Carpenters, 3 feet s 80 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2 Inoh, lnl" footlenghts 3 30 



4 00 

5 28 

7 26 

8 80 



white lead ground in oil. 
Montreal 

Munro's Seleot Flake Wbite 

Elephant Genuine . .... 

Moore s Pure White Lead. ... 

LilyPure » 00 

Tiger Pure b uu 

Monarch iWindsor) .. 

Essex Genuine (Windsor) ... 
Brandrams B. B. Genuine . 7 25 
(."P"re... B00 



Door bells, push and turn, 45 and 10 p.o. 
Cow bells, 65 p.c. 

Sleigh bells, shaft and hames, pair, 22c up. 
Per 100 lb sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1.15 up. 
Farm beUs, No. 1, 81-65. 



6 00 
B 75 
6 00 



Toronto 
6 90 
6 90 
6 15 
6 15 
6 15 
6 50 

6 15 

7 40 
6 15 
6 15 
6 15 
6 15 



. COTTER PINS 
Ootter pins. 90 p.c. Mvntreal 

COPPER AND NIOKEL WARE. 
Oopper boilers, kettles, 50 p.c 
Oopper tea and coffee pots, 45 p.os> 
Copper pitts, SO per cent. 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 45 p.o. 

DOOR KNOBS 
Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per oent. 



2 25 

3 40 



BOLTS AND NUTS 



RauiBay's Pure Lead 

R»nn»V» Wxterlor 

C.P. Co.'s Decorators' Pure. 

Western Schedule. 
Terms- 2 p c 30 days or net 3 months from Carriage Bolts, common new 81 list 
date of shipment. Packages 25 lbs. and over. 
500-lb kegs, 15c per 100 lbs. lower. Delivery— 
FOB Toronto or Hamilton ; London, 5c per 
100 lbs. extra. Contracts as required until 
15th May, 1911. 



Extra, 60, 10 and 10 per oent. 

No ^ no d £ wide°r M "i£Mio »nd 10 Poro^afa, "mTne"r.T and 7*7 taffliT net list. 

Agricultural, not wider than 4 In., 75 per oei t 

DOOR SETS. 

Canadian. 45 and 10 per oent. 

Door pulls, 60 per cent. 

DOOR HANGERS (PARLOR) 

Single sets, each (Easy brand) 1 80 

Double sets, each 8 25 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet ... 5 00 



Lace leather, per side, 80o.; out laoes, 86o. 

BIRD OAGEf . 

Brass and Japanned, 40 p. o. 



Per cent 
70 



WHITE EINO (DRY). 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 

WHITE KINO III OIL.; 

Pare, In S5-lb. Irons 

No. 1, " 

No. S. " " 



071 



08) 
07 

051 



j and smaller. 
■• 7-16 and up..... 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, I and less 60, 10 4 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up ... . 60 

Plough Bolts 55, 5 & 10 

Blank Bolts ... 60 

BoltEnds i---i\ ?£ a in 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, i and less. . . 60 and 10 
Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 & larger 55 and 05 

Coach Screws, new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 4io per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c per 11 ff. 
Stove rods, per lb., 5J to 6p 
Stove Bolts 80. 



DOOR SPRINGS 
Chicago (coil), 25 per cent. 
Reliance (coil), 20 per cent. 

DRAW KNIVES. 



Carpenters 6 inch, doz 

Folding handles, 8 inch, doz. 



5 25 
1 80 



DRILLS. 

Bit stock drills, 2-32 In., doz 67 

ESCUTCHEON PINS 
Steel, dUooun t 60 per oent. 
Brass, 66 per oent. 



per 1001b 4 50 

overl2ln " .... 3 5* 

Orate hinges and back flaps, 65 and 5 p. o. 
Ohest hinges and hinge hasps, 65 p.o. 

HINGES (SPRING) 

Spring, per gross— No. 5, 816.10; No. 10, 
$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 50, 817.58; No. 
51, 87.76; No. 120. 816.10. 

Screen door Bets— No. 2250, 814.95; No. 2260, 
819.55; No. 2275, 821.85; No. 1192, 819.55. 

Chicago hold back screen door, iron, gro. $12. 

Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c. 

Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c. 

Chicago surface floor (6,000), 45 p.c. 

Garden City fire house hinges, 12) p.o. 

" Chief " floor hinge, 50 p.o. 

HOOKS 

Wrought Iron hooks and staples— 

4x5 per gross 

5-16x6 R 

Bright wire screw eyes, 60 p. a 

Bright steel gate hooks and staples 

Iron Bcrew hooks, 60 and 20 p.o. 

Iron gate hooks and eyes. 60 and 20 p.o. 

Orescent hat and ooat wire, 60 per cent. 

Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and square hooks, 

60 p.c. 

HORSE NAILS. 
M.R.M. cold forged process, list 3rd January, 

1910, 82.80 per box base No. 9 and larger. 
Oapewell brand, quotations on application. 

HORSESHOES. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy, No. 
2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $4.15; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.40; " X.L" steel shoes, new 
light pattern, 1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.35; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.60; " XL." steel shoes, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes, No. to 4, 
$5.75; special countersunk steel, all sizes, 
0-4 $6.25; toe weight steel shoes, all sizes, 
No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J. P. & Co., "Blunt" No. 
1 and smaller, $1.50; No. 2 and larger, $1.25. 
"Sharp" No. 1 and smaller, $1.75; No. 2 and 
larger, $1.50 per box. Put up in 26-lb. boxes. 

HORSE WEIGHTS. 
Taylor-Forbes, 4}o. per lb. 

ICE CREAM FREEZERS. 
White Mountain. 50 p.c 



58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A Word to the Dealer! 



Are you selling the old-fashioned " paint-me-oftenoid " roofing, 
or are you selling the modern "no-paint'* kind called Amatite Roof- 
ing? We are spending thousands of dollars every month in adver- 
tising to tell the consumers that the day of painted roofings is past 
and that they can secure at the same price Amatite Roofing -which 
needs no painting. <|| Amatite has a practical, durable mineral sur- 
face Lay it on the roof and it needs no further care. <J Every 
practical user of ready roofings sees the point in a minute. He 
knows that painting roofs every two or three years is a nuisance 
and that it costs him money. He knows that he is liable to neglect 
it, or find when the time comes round that he cannot afford to buy the paint just then, or hasn't the time, and so the roof gets 
neglected and wears out. <J Show him that you have a "no-paint" roofing which costs no more than the old-fashioned kinds and 
you will get his order. <J Amatite is easy to lay, requiring no skilled labor. Nails and cement are supplied free, packed in the 
centre of the roll. Booklets, samples and other information on request. Address our nearest office. 

THE PATERSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Limited 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER ST. JOHN, N.B. HALIFAX, N.S. 



ROOFING 



MONTREAL 



Stand 



*■■ II wY O LCi 1 1 U jY Ability to withstand wide variations of temperature 
I** J/ consideration with the building papers and roofi 

// y ou nan( ^^ e - I n this respect our 

Weather^ " Reat| y" Roofin 8 and " Black Diamond" Tarred 
j ■ ■ *& and "Cyclone" and "Joliette" Building Paper 

1 Vwl ■ yx are we U worthy of your recommendation, and they are, more 
over, profitable lines to handle. They can be laid by any ordin; 
workman, and never fail to give the fullest satisfaction to you 
customer. We also make a lull line of Wrapping Papers, ^ffrv 

Western Agent-F. J. COX, Winnipeg. "^gSr 




Montreal 



RED 

S 

BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 



GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 




Works, DON SPEEDWAY 



TORONTO 



HEINISCH 



The above name on TAILOR SHEARS, TINNER SNIPS, SHEARS OR SCISSORS is your absolute 
guarantee of the very highest quality obtainable. We have 85 years' experience behind us, and the care 
taken in the selection of raw materials, together with correct tempering of the blades, have made HEINISCH 
GOODS the standard for the world. You will gain prestige with every pair of HEINISCH SHEARS you sell. 

SOLD BY ALL JOBBERS 

R. Heinisch's Sons Co. f \fc /Veiv ark, N.J. , U.S.A. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



mnt 

Hay knlvoe, net lilt. 
Uliuu, 90 and 36 per oent 

EITOHKH IMAMILZD WARS 

White ware, 75 per oent. 
London and Princess, 50 per oent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite steel. 50 and 10 

per oenL 
Premier iteel ware, 40 per oent. 
Bur decorated steel and white, 15 per oent. 
Hollow ware, tinned ca»t, 50 per oent off. 
Enamelled street signs, 40 p.o. 

KITCHEN SUNDRIES. 

Asbestos mats, 60 p a 

Oan openers, per doi Q *° " TB 

Mincing knives perdoi 50 90 

Potato maahera, wire, per do*.. . 80 70 

wood " .. 50 8 J 



Vegetable slloers, per doi S 515 

TJnlTeraal meat chopper. No. 1 1 15 

Enterprise ohopper, each ISO 

Spiders and try pans, 50 and 6 p.o. 

Star Al ohopper 6 to S3 1 85 4 10 

" lOOtolOS 1 86 300 

Kitchen hooka, bright 60 

Toasteri, 50 p. o 
Fire shovels, 50. 
Oil stov.- j and ovens. 50 and 10. 

LADDIES 
S to 6 feet, 13c per foot ; 7 to lft., 13c. 
Extension ladders, 15c. per foot up. 

URUH 

Japanned ware, 45 per oeou 

No. 3 or 4 Plain Cola Blast per dos. 6 76 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 6 Ou 
Japanning, 50c. per dozen extra. 
Prism globes, per dozen, $1.20 
Lamp wick, 50 per oent. 

LAWN HOSE 

Competition grade lawn hose, 70 and 5. 
LAWN MOWERS 

Taylor Forbes Co. — 8-inch wheel, 3 knives, 
12 in, $5.10; 9-in. wheel, 3 knives, 12 in., 
$6 75; 9-in. wheel, 5 knives, 12 in., $7.75, 
10i-in. wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., $8.50; lOJ-in, 
wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., ball bearing, $10.00: 
50 per cent, f.o.b. Guelph 



PI«0»I> WARS. 

Olaoount 35 per oent. 
'0-ot flaring sap buokeU. 35 per oent. 
«., 10 and 14-q.t flaring pa^s 35 per oent. 
Copper bottom tea kettle* and boilers, 35 p.o. 
Coal hods, 40 per oent. 
Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.o. 
FLAstbs. 

Wood bench, Canadian, 40, Amerloan, 35 p.o. 

Wood, fanoy, SO to S5 per oent 

Stanley planes, $1.55 to $360, net list prtoea. 

PLUM AMD NIPPERS. 

Buttons genuine, 874 to 40 per oent 

PUMPS. 

Berg's wing pump, 76 per oent 

raiors. per dos. 

Boker's 7 80 1100 

KlngOutter 15 00 

Heookel's 7 60 30 00 

Olauss automatlo safety 37 00 

Olauss perfeot strapper 16 00 

Gillette Safety, eaoh 8 76 

Olauss Baton and Strops, 60 per oent 

Ever Beady Safety > 00 

ROPI AND TWim. 

Sisal rope 08i 

Pure Manilla rope 10} 

•British "Manilla 08} 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 24 

Russia Deep Sea line, 1 in. diam. and 

over, 154 ; under } in., 16}. 
Jute, | and upwards, 9c. ; under j, 9}c. 

Lath yaro, single "08 

Lath yarn, double h ' 8} 

Sisel bed cord, 48 feet, per dozen 6o 

Sisel bed cord, 6 feet, per dozen .... 
Sisel bed cord, 72 feet, per dozen . . 
Cotton clothes line, 274 off. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine .... 

" " 4-ply twine 

Mattress twine, per lb 

Staging " " 



Set, case hardened 60 

Square oap 50 and 05 

Hexagon cap 45 

Bench, wood, per doz $5 00 

" iron, per doz 4 26 

SCREWS (MACHINE) 

Flat bead, Iron and brats, 85 per cent 
Fillister head, Iron, SO: brass, 36 per cent 

SCREW DRIVERS, 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 1 00 

North Bros., No. 30, per dozen 16 80 

SCISSORS AND SHEARS 

Olauss, nlokel scissors and shears, 60; Japai 

65; tailors, 40 ; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's, 50 and 10 per oent 

SHELF BRACKETS 

No. 140 66 and 10 p.o. 

SKATES AND HOCKEY STICKS. 

Starr skates, 37 i per oent. 
Boker, hockey 30c. upwards ; spring, 
Empire hookey sticks, $3 00, $3.60. 
Miomao and Bex ttloks, $4.00, $6.00 
Pucks net, $1.50. 



trunk nails, blaok, 65 and 10: trunk nails, tin- 
ned and blued, 65 and 10 ; clout nails, blued 
and tinned. 65 and 10 ; chair nails, 35 and 10 ; 

?atent brads, 40 and 10 ; fine finishing, 40 and 
; lining tacks, in papers, net ; lining tacks, 
in bulk, 15; lining tacks, solid heads, in bulk, 
75; saddle nails, in papers, 10 ; saddle nails, 
in bulk, 15; tufting buttons, 22 line in dozens 
only, 60; zinc glaziers' points, 5; double 
pointed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 65; clinch point shoe 
rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 87 J ; 
trunk tacks, 80 and 20 ; strawberry box tacks. 
80 and 10. 



TAPE LEKBS. 

Universal, aas skin, No. 714, 66 ft., doz. S 0U 

Lufklns, linen, No. 404, 66 ft, eaoh.... 94 

" steel, No. 364, 66 ft, eaoh .... 8 60 

Ohesterman' r linen, No. 1822, 66 ft. ea. 1 1U 

" Metallic No. 1831 1 $6 

" Steel, No. 1840, 60 feet ... . 4 10 



TROWELS. 
Disston's, 10 per cent. 



THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 



u 95 

27 
26 
30 
45 
35 



REPRISE RATOBS 
Sanderson-Harold, 40 per oent. 
Galvanized, 45 p.o. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, blaok and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Bum, 60 and 10 and 10 p.o. 



SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 2} p.o.; 
No. 8 and 4 grade, 50 and 3i p.o. 

SQUARES. 

Disston's 60 and 10 p.o. 

Stanley Try Squares, size 7i, doz. net. . $2 85 



Harness, 25 per cent. 



SOLDERING IRONS 



Base, per lb., 38 oents. 

STAMPED WARE 
Plain, 75 and 12} per cent. 



3k D nivri^ & ^0;lo^ h kres,t6 e 2l: 0^^"^. proton burr.. 85 and Retinned, 75 and 12} per cent 
9-inr.h whppl 3 knives. 12 in. sizes. S6.75: _ u * percent. sap spouts. 



9-inch wheel, 3 knives, 12 in. sizes, $6.75; 
do., 4 knives, $7.25 ; lOJ-inch wheel, 4 kniveB, 
12 in. sizes, $8.50, ball bearing do., $10; 
do., 5 knives, $10.50. 50 per cent, f.o.b. fac- 
tory. 

LOOKS AND KEYS. 

Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 

LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES 

Cant hooks, dozen, from 12 00 

Axes, dozen, from 6 50 

Axe handles, dozen, from 1 15 

Cross cut saws, per foot 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

Ball and heel calks 4 00 4 25 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', 21 x 5} in. , per doz 1 25 

Carpenters', round hickory, 6 in., per 

doz 1 95 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per doz 2 40 
Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz 15 00 

MATS 

Wire door mats, standard, 16x24, doz. 9 00 
METAL POLISH. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

Axollne brass cleaner, 100 in package 6 50 

MINERS SUPPLIES 
Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, $6 dozen 
Pioks, 6 to 71b., 4.65 doz. 
Piok handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 16} oents per lb 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, 31 cents per lb. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

Mops, per doz 1 20 1 60 

Folding ironing board! 16 15 18 00 

nails Wire 

1-1} Inch 3 30 

liinch 2 95 

lj- Uinch 2 70 

2 — 2i inch 2 60 

2j— 2Jinch , 2 45 

3— 3}inch 2 40 

3} — 4inch 2 35 

4}, 5, 51, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Out nails— Montreal, $2.40 ; Toronto, $2.60. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, 75 per oent. 
Coopers' nails, 334 per cent. 

Pressed spikes, j diameter, per 100 lbs. . 2 85 



Copper Burrs only, 321 P-0. 

Extras on Coppered Rivets, i-lb. packages 

lo. per lb.; i-lb. packages So. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 3c per lb. 
Coppered Rivets, net extra, 21o. per lb. 

RIVET BETS. 

Canadian, 85 to 871 per oent. 
RULES. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 3 foot, doz 115 

vory, No. 1283, 2 foot, eaoh 3 50 

SAD IRONS. 
Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per let 80 
" No. 50, niokle-plated, " 85 

" handles, japaned, per gross 8 40 

Gammon, plain. 4 35 

" plated 5 60 

Asbestos, per set 1B0 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

Sand and emery paper, 40 per oent 

SASH WEIGHTS 

Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb 2 25 

Sectional, % lb. each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to SO lbs 155 

SASH CORD. 
No. 8, per lb 33 



Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 per cent 
Disston's Hand, 15 per cent. 
Simonds Hand. 15 per cent. 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 35 per cent 

SAW SETS. 

Canadian discount 40 p.o. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS Doz 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in., style 7 80 

Common doors or 3 panel, grained 

only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 28} 

inches 1 60 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, open 

221 inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 561 

lnohee 2 25 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

STAPLES 

Poultry netting, 100 lbs 6 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind, per lb 1J 

Coopers' staples, 45 per oent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per oent. 



STABLE PITTINGS. 
Dennis Wire « Iron Oo», 334 P.o. 

STOVE BOARDS 

Lithographed, 60 and 10 

STOVEPIPES. 

6 and 6 lnoh, per 100 lengths . . 

7lnoh " ™ 

Nestable, 40 per oent. 

STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 



7 62 

8 18 



Plumbers ....per 100 lb 4 50 

OILERS. 

Kemp's Tornado and MoOlary ■ Model 
galvanized oil oan, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, perdozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, 40 per oent. 

Zlno and tin, 50 per oent. 

Coppered oilers, 60 per oent. ott. 

Brass oilers, 50 per oent, 

Malleable, 25 per oent 

PLATED GOODS 

Hollowware, 40 per cent discoun 

Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, and 50. 

Hutton's "Cross Arrow" ftatwa/e, 42} per 

cent. "Singalese" and "Alaski" Nevada 

silver flatware, 42 p.c. 



Gurney Standard, 35; Champion, 50 p.c 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35; Weigh Beams, 35; Champion 
Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 50; 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 ; 
Weigh Beams, 30. 

SCYTHE SNATHS 
Canadian, 40 per oent. 



5 and 6-inoh, common per doz. 1 22 

7-Inoh " 136 

Polished, 15o per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 p.c 



STOCKS AND DIES. 



No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 18 75 



STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

" Axe " .... 10 

Deer Greek " 10 

Deerlick " 25 

" Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " .... 42 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 



TINNERS SNIPS. 

Discount 35 per cent. 



SCREWS 



Per cent 



TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; tinned, 
85 ; (in kegs), 40 ; cut tacks, blued, in dozens 



Wood F.H., bright and steel 85 and 10 only,80and 10; i weights, 60; Swedes cut 



R.H., bright 80 and 10 

F.H., brass 75 and 10 

" R.H., brass 70 and 10 

" F.H., bronze 70 and 10 

" R.H., bronze 65 and 10 

Drive screws 85 and 10 



tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in 
dozens, 75 and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', 
bulk, 90; brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 
and 10; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and jap- 
anned, 82}; zinc tacks, 35; leather carpet 
tacks, 35 ; copv - *>»cks, 45 ; copper nails, 50 ; 



TINNERS TRIMMINGS 

Discount, 45 per cent. 

Plain and retinned, 75 and 12}. 

TRAPS (STEEL GAME) 

Newhouse, 30 per cent. 

Hawley & Norton, 40, 10 and 5 per cent. 

Victor, 60 and 5 per cent. 

Oneida Jump (Star), 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

TRAPS (RAT AND MOUSE) Dot 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps 60 

" Rat Traps 1 20 

Easy Set Mouse 45 

" " Rat 96 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 45 

" Rat Traps 95 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse Traps 25 
Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat Traps 80 
5-Hole Tin Chokers 80 

VISES 

Per pound 12 12) 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 55 

Sawvise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths', 60 ; parallel, 45 per cent. 



WASHING MACHINES 

New Ontario 41 26 

Round, re-acting, per doz 81 25 

Square, re-acting, per doz 77 50 

DowsweU 52 50 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 25 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 52 50 

Ottawa 55 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 50 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer 180 00 

20 per cent. 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., doz 47 75 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 50 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 inch 53 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 inch 58 25 

Favorite, 5 year, 11 inch 61 75 

20 per cent. 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 2u 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

WHIFFLETREES 

Tubular steel whiffletrees, 28 in 70 

" 34 in 100 

" " " 36 in 125 

" •' neckyokes, 36 in 106 

" " doubletrees, 40 in 95 

11 " lumbermens, 44 In.... 1 IS 



WOOD HANDLES 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and shove 

handles, 40 p.c 
Extra ash fork, hoe, *ake and shovel handles, 

45 per cent. 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 p.c 
Carriage neckyokes and whiffletrees, ash 35, 

hickory 40 p.c 
Team neckyokes, oval aud round whiffletrees, 

hickory and ash, 35 p.c 
All other ash goods, 40 p.c 
All hickory, maple and oak goods 35 p.c 

WRENCHES 
Agricultural, 67} p.c 

WROUGHT IRON WA8HEB8 
Canadian, 50 per oent. 



60 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ramsay's 
Varnishes 



One of the greatest lines for profit 
in the business is the Varnish 
Line. 

Study this line carefully. 

You ought to have the profit. 

Varnishes in tin provide the best 
profit, because it is quick and no 
waste. 

The Ramsay lines of Varnishes are 
leading everywhere, because they 
have the greatest value for the 
smallest price. They are favorites. 
Here is one of them. 




Ramsay's Universal Varnish is the 
big leader to-day. It has been out, 
tried and proved for years. 

It is in general use for Counters, 
Doors, Carriages, Sleighs, Floors, 
Desks, Boats, Wainscots, Oil- 
cloths, Etc. 

Have Ramsay's Universal, and 
you have a Varnish for all. Drop 
us a card and we will tell you 
more about it. 

A. RAMSAY & SON CO. 

Established 1842 

The Paint Makers 
MONTREAL 




" DOMINION " 

"The Crown of Quality" 

Polished Canada Plates 

All Polished Plates. Nice Bright Finish. 
Soft and Tough. Easy to Work. 

Insist on getting "DOMINION CROWN" 

A. C. LESLIE A CO., LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



With 



You get perfect protection in every 
way. Exclusive sale of our products 
in your town and territory. Iron 
bound guarantee of quality and satisfac- 
tion for your customers. You get a 
quicker and more complete service than 
you could get elsewhere, and enjoy the 
enormous advantage of an advertising cam- 
paign devoted solely to Western Canada. 

Write or wire at our expense and we will 
gladly go into details with you. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisement* art Inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is inserted solely for the con- 

vanience of the readers of the paper. 



American Shearer Co 76 

Ami Spiaih Filler Oo 7i> 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Co 77 84 

Atkim ft Co.. EC 82 

Atlas Mfg. Co 77 

Auto Controller Co. , The 27 

Ajlmer Pump and Scale Co M 

k \ Dinas Silica Brick & Lime Co — 76 

Barber Asphalt Paring Co 17 

Baniett. Q. ft H. Co. . . .outside back oover 

Barton Netting Co 8J 

Belleville Hdw. ft Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. 1 

Bemi* .» Call Hardware and To 1 Co. . . 74 

Kerry Bros . Ltd 5? 

BigBby ft Sons, W. T 28 

Bisset.J. A 76 

Boeckh Bros 67 

BosseftBankB 76 

Booth-Ooulter Copper* Brass Co 72 

Bowser, S. P., ft Co., Ltd 67 

Brandram-Henderson, Ltd 56 

Bridgeport Hdw. Mfg. Corp 25 

British American Assurance Co 74 

Brown Boggs Co., Ltd 13 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 80 

Burrow Stewart ft Milne Co. Ltd 22 

Cameron ft Campbell 75 

Canada Cement Co inside back cover 

Canada Foundry Co '4 

Canada Metal Co 76 

Canada Paint Oo 63 

Canada Steel Goods Co 8 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co 74 

Canadian Copper Co 24 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 20 

Canadian Gas Users Assurance 76 

Canadian Hart Wheels 76 

Canadian Hea ing and Ventilating Co 21 

Canadian National Carbon i'o 33 

Canadian National Exhibition 72 

Canadian Potato Machinery Oo 77 

Carbon Oil Works 71 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co 5 

Cheney ft Son S 76 

Chicago Spring Butt Co 1 

l l.rksonft Sons, E. R. C 10 

Collins Mfg. Co 77 

Connor, J. H., ft Son 83 

Copp, W. J., Sons ft Co 21 



OowanftBritton 72 

Cummer Do wswell, Ltd 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 8 

Delta File Co •■ 24 

Directory of Manufacturers 76 77 

Dominion Cartridge Co 34 

Dorken Bros outside front oover ,73 

Dougall Vamish Oo 67 

Erie Iron Works Co 74 

Estate of O. D. Cowan 77 

Ford Auger Bit Co 72 

Frothinghaui ft Workman, Ltd 4 

Gait Art Metal Oo 2 

Gendron Mfg Co. Ltd 16 

Gibb, Alexander 76 

Gilbertson, W., ft Co 19 

Gillette Safety Razor Co.. in8>de frontcover 

Ooodell-Pratt Co 18 

Greening, B., Wire Co 20 

Griswold Mfg. Co 14 

Grove Chemical Co 75 

Gutta Percha ft Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co 28 

Hamilton Cotton Oo 19 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co 70 

Harris, J. W., Co 83 

Heinisch. R. , Sons Co 59 

Hilborn ft Co., Ltd 77 

Hirschhorn, J 27 

Howland, H. S., Sons ft Oo 7 

Hutton. Jas. . ft Co 74 

Ideal Sad Iron Co 29 

Imperial Varnish and Color Oo 53 

International Varnish Co 68 

James ft Reid 76 

Jardme, A. B., ft Co 19 

Jenkins Bros 18 



Kyle, P. 



77 



Laidlaw Bale Tie Oo 30 

Leslie, A. C.&Co 61 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

Lindsay, ChaB 77 

London Foundry Oo 82 

London Bolt and Hinge Works 77 



London Rolling Mill Co W 

Lufkin Rule Co inside back cover 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

McArthur, Alex., ft Co 59 

McClary Mfg. Co 23 

McDougaU, R., Oo 78 

McFarlane «t Douglas 28 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 78 

McKinnon Chain Co 79 

Manitoba Gypsum Co 75 

Martin, L. Co 69 76 

Martin-Senour Co 67 

Maxwell, D., ft Sons 78 

Meat ins ft Sons 17 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 16 75 

Metallic Roofing Co 29 

Mitchell ft Co., David 76 

Modern Machinery Oo 24 

Moore, Benjamin, ft Co 70 

Morris ft Bailey Steel Co 79 

Myers ft Bro., F. E 24 

National Cash Register Co 9 

National Hardware Co 80 

Newman, W., ft Sons 76 

Nicholson File Co J6 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish Co 75 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Goal Co 77 

Oakey, John, ft Sons 71 

Ontario Lantern ft Lamp Co., Ltd 79 

Otterville Mfg. Co 74 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 14 

Page Wire Fence Co 75 

Palmer Co., The J. E 33 

Parker Co., Chas 21 

Parmenter Bullock Co., The 77 

Paterson Mfg. Co 59 

Pease Foundry Co 19 

Peterborough Lock Co. . . inside back cover 

Pinchin- Johnson & Co. , Ltd 53 

Pink, Thos 81 

Pratt ft Lambert 68 

Ramsay, A., ft Son Co 61 

Rem.ArmsUnion Metallic Cartridge Co 34 

Remington Typewriter Co 16 



Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., P. L 76 

Ross Rifle Oo 84 

Sadler ft Haworth 31 

Samuel, M. ft L, Benjamin, ft Co 80 

Saskatchewan (ila.su ft Supply Co 20 

Schuchardt ft Schutte 30 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 72 

Sharratt ft Newth 77 

Shaw, A., ft Son 77 

Sherwin-Williams Co 65 

Sheet Metal Products Co 26 

Phurly-Dietrich Co. Ltd 73 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 82 

Slocomb Co., J. T 27 

Soclean Limited 25 

Southern States Turpentine Co 63 

Standard Chain Co 83 

Staiidard Mfu. Co 30 

Standard Paint and Vamish Co 71 

Stanley Rule and Level Co 30 

Stanley Works, The outside baok cover 

Fteel Oo of Canada, Ltd 6 

Steele. Ltd., Jas 77 

Stephens G. F 61 

Stfcvens-Hepner Co 69 

Stewart Mfg. Co., JaB., Ltd 25 

Still, J. H., Mfg. Co inside back cover 

Stratford Mfg. Co 29 

Tallman Brass and Metal Oo 75 

Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson, B. ft S. H. . .outside back cover 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co 59 

Trewhella Bros 77 



Valor Co., Ltd., The 68 

Want Ads 66 

Watson Mfg. Co., John 77 

Western Assurance Co 75 

Western Clock Mfg. Co 15 

Western Distributors, Ltd 76 

Western Wire and Nail Co 77 

Wheeler ft Bain 31 

White Mop Wringer Co 71 

Whitman ft Barnes Mfg. Oo 81 

Whitlock & Marlatt 76 

Wilkinson Plow Co 10 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co., Ltd. ... 63 

Woodstock Wagon ft Mfg. Co 24 

Wright, E. T., ft Co 73 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Aluminum Ware 

Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie Pa. 
Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto 

Auger Bits. 

Ford Anger Bit Co., Holyoke, Mass. 
Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal 
Remi gton Anns Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co , New York 

Anchors, Star Screw 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 
Frothineham ft Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Magnolia Metal Co. Montreal. 

Bar Iron 

Henry Rogers, Sons ft Co., Montreal 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
J. L. Goodhue ft Co., Danville, Que. 
Sadler & Howorth, Monti eal 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Peroha and Bobber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Binder Twine. 

Plymouth Cordage Oo., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Bird Cages 

E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 

Boilers and Radiators 

Pease Foundry Oo., Toronto 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Bolts. 

London Bolt and Hinge Works, London 

Ontario 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Bolts — Expansion 

Star Expansion Bolt Co. New York 



Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Tallman Brass ft Metal Co., Hamilton 

Brass Goods. 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Jas. Cartland ft Son, Ltd., Birmingham, 

Eng. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Oo.. Toronto. 
Taylor-Forbes Co , Ltd., Guelph, Out. 

Bridle Rings— Galvanized, 

Brass and Plain 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Brushes 

Boeckh Bros. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Stevens-Hepner Co., Port Elgin 

Burners. 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co., Hamil- 
ton, Ont. 

Builders' Tools and Supplies. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
OaverhlU, Learmont ft Oo. , Montreal 
Frothinghamdk Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Howland. H. S. Sons ft Oo., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co.. Montreal. 
Lufkin Rule Oo. Saginaw. Mloh. 
Newman ft Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule ft Level Co., New Britain. 
Taylor-Forbes Oo., Guelph, O 

Calipers 

J. T. Slocomb Co., Providence, R.I. 

Cans. 

American Can Co. M ntreal, Que. 
Thos. Davidson Mfs Co., Montreal. 
McClary Mfg. Co., Toronto 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Carrier*, Cash and Parcel 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton 

Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, Grand 
Rapids, Mich 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Gnelph Spring and Axle Co., Gnelph. 

Cartridges. 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Union Metallic Cartridge Co., New York, 
U.S.A. 



62 



Cash Registers 

National Cash Register Co., Toronto 

Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
McKinnon Ohain Co., St. Catharines 
Oneida Community Limited, Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 

Cement 

Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 
B. ft S. H. Thompson ft Co., Montreal 

Chafing Dishes. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo.r Buffalo 

Cbaplets 

S. Cheney & Son, Manlius, N.Y. 

Churns. 

Connor. J. H., ft Sons, Ottawa, Ont 
Cummer-Oowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
Maxwell, David, ft Sons, St. Mary's, Ont 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Hboarer Mfg. Co.. Nashua, N.H 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago 

Clocks 

The Western Clock Mfg. Oo., La Salle, 
111. 

Clothes Reels and Lines. 

Cummer Dowawell, Ltd., Hamilton 
Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hamilton, 

Clothes Wringers 

Cummer-Dowswell Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
American Wringer Co., New York City 

Cold Rolled Strip Steel 

The Morris ft Bailey Steel Co., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

Copper. Sheets, Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 
Toronto 

Cordage. 

Hamilton Cotton Oo., Hamilton. 
Plymouth Cordage Oo., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Corrugated Iron 

The Gait Art Metal Oo., Gait, Ont, 

Cow Ties 

Greening, B., Wire Oo., Hamilton 

McKinnon Dash and Metal Co., St 

Catharines 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls, 



Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal. 
MnOlary's. ' """V" 1"t 
The Sheet Metai Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 

Cutlery— Razors, Scissors, etc. 

OaverhlU. Learmont ft Oo. Montreal 
Crookes, Jonathan, ft Son 
Dorkec Bros, ft Oo., Montreal. 
Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd., Montrea 
Heinisch 's, R-, Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland. H. S. Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Hutton, Jas., ft Oo., Montreal 
MoGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara 
Falls 

Door Hangers 

Hunt, Helm Ferris ft Co.. Harvard, 111 
Richards Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora 111 

Drills — Brick and Stone 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Drills— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 

Dry Batteries 

Canadi n Carbon Co., Toronto 
Canadian National Catbon Co., Toronto 

Egg B'.aters 

Geo. G. Veness Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass 

Emery or Corundum Wheels 

Canadian Hart Wheels Limited, Hamil- 
ton. Ont. 

Electrical Sw plies 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto 
hie.ctTK A- 1 » n> t ■.« . 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd.. Windsor, 

Ont 
Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Enameled Ware 

Davidson Thos.. Mfg. Co.. Montr** I 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
MoOlary's. London Oni 
Ernest Stevens, Ltd., Cradley Heath 

England 

Engine Supplies, etc. 
Penberthy Injector Oo , Windsor, Ont. 

Bavetroughs 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal 

MoOI*ry's. T.nndnn Ont 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
Wheeler ft Bain, Toronto 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ATTENTION! 




A FAVORITE IN THE CORONATION PROCES- 
SION 

The Midsummer holidays 
may interfere with our 
salesmen calling upon our 
Hardware friends with 
their accustomed regular- 
ity. Please note, that 
all orders by Mail, Wire 
or Telephone will be ap- 
preciated by 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 

and receive every 

ATTENTION! 




Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine 

Second Run Turpentine 

Japanese Raw or Roiled Oil 



SOUTHERN STATES TURPENTINE CO. 

Montreal Office and Warehouse — De L'Epee Ave. and C.P.R. Tracks. 

Toronto Office — 101 Victoria St. Warehouse — Brock Ave. 

Main Office — Cleveland, Ohio 

P.S. — Correspondence solicited. Prices, as well as 
samples, sent on approval. If it is Price, Quality 
and Service you look to when placing your orders, 
you should be looking to us to fill them. 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Escutcheon Pins 

The Parmenter ft Bulloch Co.. Gana- 
noque, One 

Fencing— Woven Wire. 

The Steel Co.- of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Oo.. O. * B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

I Pile Works. Philadelphia, Pa. 
DlMton, Henry, ft Bona, Philadelphla.Pa. 
Nicholson File Oo.. Port Hope 
Slmonda Canada Saw Co., Ltd., Montreal 
Fire Extinguishers 
The Valor C.o. Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Fire Irons 
Charles Lindsay, Glasgow, Scotland 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Harrington ft Richardson Sons Oo., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

Fire Escapes. 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Dennis Wire * Iron oo., London 

Fire Place Furnishings 

The Bai ton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor, 

Ont 
Charles Lindsay, Glasgow, Scotland 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia 
Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa 

Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago 
Ontario Lantern k Lamp Co., Hamilton 

Furnaces, see Stoves 
Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Oo., Toronto. 
U.S. Steel Products Export Co., Mont- 
real 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo.. Montreal. 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Galvanizea Iron 

W. Gilbertson 4 Co., Ltd. Alex. Gibb, 

Montreal, Agent 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Glass 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Glass Ornamental 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Oo 

Toronto. 
Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Glass Wired 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co. Winnipeg 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Pelton, Godfrey 8. 

Sharratt 4 Newth, London, Eng. 

Winnipeg Paint k Glass Co , Winnipeg 

Glue, 

The Canada Glue Co., Ltd., Brantford, 
Grove Chemical Co., Appley Bridge <^ng. 

Go-Carts, etc. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Grindstones 

Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 

Guns 

Harrington * Richardson Arms Co. 
Worchester, Mass. 

Hammocks 

The I. E. Palmer Co., Middletown, Con. 

Handles. 

St. Mary's Wood Specialty Co., St. 

Mary's, Ont 
Still, J. H., Mfg. Oo., St. Thomas 

Hardware Specialties 

Hunt, Helm Ferris ft Co., Harvard, III 
Taylor-Forbes Oo., Ltd., Guelph, Ont 

Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Oo., Hamilton. 
Cowan ft Britton, Ganonoque 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont 

Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St. Thomas. 

Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd.. Montret 1 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd. , Hamilton 

Horseshoes and Nails 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Ice Cream Freezers 

North Bros. Mfg Oo.. Philadelphia 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Ice Cutting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
renberthylnJeotorOo.. Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe- 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 



Iron Pumps, 

Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer 
MoDoturall. K. On.. Gait, Ont. 

Lmdders, Shelf 

Hamilton Ilium Mfg Co . Hamilton 

Lampblack 

The L. Martin Co , New York 

Wilckes Martin Wilckes Co., New York 

Lamps 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Lanterns. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal 
Ontario Lantern and Lamp Oo., Hamil- 
ton, Ont 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

The Sheet Metal Products Oo. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Wright, IS. '!'•, ft U)., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, D.,ft Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Jas Smart Mfg 00, BrookviUe, Ont 
Taylor, Forbes Co.. Guelph. 

Lighting Fixtures 

Jas. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Locks, Knobs, Escutcheons, etc 

Belleville Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Company 

Belleville. 
National Hardware Oo, Orillia 
Peterborough Look Mfg. Oo., Peter- 
borough, Out. 

Lumbering Tools. 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke. Ont. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Mcintosh, H. F., ft Oo., Toronto. 
Glbb. Alexander. Montreal. 
Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon 
Whitlock ft Marlatt, Moose Jaw 

Mantels and Grates 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor, 
Ont 

Metals. 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Canada Metal Oo., Toronto. 
Oaverhill, Learmont ft Oo., Montreal 
Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Leslie. A O, ft Co., Montreal. 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 
Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal 
Nova Scotia Steel and Ooal Oo., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Samuel, Benjamin* Co., Toronto. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Thompson. B. ft 8. H. ft Co. Montreal. 

Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc- 

Galt Art Metal Oo., Gait 

Metallio Roofing Co., Toronto 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Preston 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 
Oakey, John, ft Sons, London, Eng. 

Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co. Ltd., Toronto 

Mop Sticks 

Tarbox Bros., Toronto 

Mop Wringers. 

White Mop Wringer Oo.,Fultonvllle.N.Y. 

Nail Pullers 

The Bridpgeport Hdw Corp., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Nails Wire 

Canada Screw Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mfg. Oo., Montreal. 
Montreal Rolling Mills, Montreal 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque 
United States Steel Products 
Oo., Montreal. 

oners 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd. , Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Wright, E.T., ft Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Oil Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton, Ont 

Oil Stoves 

McOlary Mfg. Co., London 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Oil Tanks. 

Bowser, S. F., ft Co., Torono. 

Ornamental Iron and Wire. 

Canadian Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire ft Iron Oo., London, Ont. 

Paints, Oils, Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
W. T. Bigsby ft Sons, London, Eng 
Brandram-Henderson, Montresl 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal 



Dougall Varnish Co. Montreal 
Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
International Varnish Co., Toronto, Ont 
Martln-Senour Oo., Montreal 
Moore. Benjamin, ft Oo. Toronto. 
Pratt ft Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, Can. 
A. Ramsay ft Son Co. , Montreal 
Sherwin-Williams Oo., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works 

Windsor, Ont. 
G. F. Stephens ft Co., Winnipeg, Man 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Paint and Varnish Remover 

Chadeloid Chemical Co., New York 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal 
Imperial Varnish ft Color Co., Toronto 

Paint Brushes, Automatic 

Standard Automatic Mfg. Co., New 
York 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plow Points 

Star Mfg. Co., Carpentersville, 111. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal 

Pumps 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
R. McDougall Co., Gait, Ont. 

Razors. 

Gillette Safety Razor Oo., Montreal 
International Distributing Co., Montreal 

Razor Hones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Hamilton 

Refrigerators 

Barnet Mfg. Co. Led., Renfrew, Ont. 
.Metal Stamping Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Registers 

Canadian FerrosteelCo., Bridgeburg, Can 

Rivets 

Steel Co. of Canada, Hamilton 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Oo., Gananoque 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton 
West, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Barber Asphalt Oo, Philadelphia 
Brantford Roofing Co. , Brantford, Ont. 
Canadian Supply Co., Toronto 
Dominion Roofing Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Gait Art Metal Oo., Gait, Ont. 
McArtbor, Alex., A Co., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallio Roofing Co.. Toronto. 
United Roofing ft Mfg. Co., Philadel- 
phia. Pa. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Oo., Winnipeg 

Rope 

Independent Oordsge Co., Toronto 

Rules and Gauges 

Jas. Ohestermanft Oo., Ltd., Sheffield, 
England 

Saws. 

Atkins, E. O, ft Co., Indianapolis, Ind 
Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia 
Shurley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont 
Simonds Mfg Oo.. Fitohbiuv Mass. 
Spear ft Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng 

Scales. 

American Cutlery Co. , Chicago 
Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, Ont. 
Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Co, Hamilton 
Frothingham ft Workman. Mn-treal. 
Sherbrooke Scale Co., Sherbrooke, Que 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Canada Screw Co., Hamilton. On 
Steel ProductB Co. of Canada, Limited, 
Hamilton 

Scythe Stones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
New York 

Shears, Scissors. 

R. Heinish's Sons Oo., Newark. N.J 
J. Wiss ft Sons Oo., Newark N.J. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Frothingham ft Workman, Montreal. 
Lundy Shovel ft Tool Co., Ltd., Peter- 
borough 

Silverware. 

McGlashan. Olarke Oo.. Niagara Falls. 
Meriden Britannia Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Ltd., Toronto 



Sprayers 



Cavers Bros., Gait, Ont 

T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montresl 



The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Ohlcago Spring Butt Co., Oh oago, 111. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Steel— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 

Steel— Cold Rolled Strip. 

Morris ft Bailey SteelOo., Pittsburg, Pa 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Ooal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 
U.S. Steel Products Oo., Montreal 
Stencils 

MoOlary's, London. Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co.. Hamilton, Unt 

Stoves, Furnaces 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Oo, Hamilton 

Clare Bros., Preston. 

W J Oopp, Son ft Oo, Fort William, Ont 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal 

The Down Draft Furnace Oo. Gait, Ont. 

Finlay Bros. & Co., Carleton Place 

Gurney-Foundry Co., Toronto. 

McClarys, London, Ont. 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Percival Plow ft Stove Co., Merrickville, 

Ontario 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 
Jas Smart Mfg Co, Ltd, Brockville, Ont 
Jas. Stewart Mfg., Co., Woodstock 

Tacks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd , Hamilton 
U.S, Steel Products Co., Montreal 

Tapes. 

Jas. Ohesterman ft Co., Sheffield Eng. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont 

Tiling— Wall and Floor 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd.. Windsor. 
Ont 

Timber Jacks 

Trewhella Bros., Birmingham, Eng 

Tin Plate. 

A. 0. Leslie ft Co., Montreal 

Tools 

The Chapin Stevens Co., Pine Meadow, 

Conn. 
The Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield. Mass 
Spear ft Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield Eng 

Tool Grinders 

LutherGrinderMfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis 

Trucks. 

Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, Ont 
Geo D Pearson ft Co., Montreal 
John Watson Mfg. Co., Ayr, Ont. 

Vacuum Cleaners 

Onward Mfg. Co., Berlin 

Valves 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Varnishes See Paints 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
The Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Geo D. Pearson ft Co., Montreal 

Vises 

Hollands Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa. 
Chas. Parker Co., Meriden, Conn. 

Waffle Irons 

Griswold Mfg Co., Erie, Pa 

Taylor Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co., Winnipeg 

Washing Machines, etc 

J. H. Connor ft Son., Ottawa, Ont. 
Cummer- Dowswell Ltd.. Hamilton, Ont. 
D. Maxwell ft Son, St. Mary's, Ont 

Wagons— Children's. 

Woodstook Wagon Co., Woodstock 

Watches. 

Louis Newmark, Montreal. 

Wheel barro ws 

Meaford Wheelbarrow Co., Meaford, 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Oaverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd M on tret I 
Howland, H. 8., Sons ft Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co., Montreal. 

Wire Mats 

Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 
Watford, Ont. 

B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamilton 

Wire Goods 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Oo.. Hamilton 

C. H. Johnson ft Sons, Ltd., Montreal 

Wire Machinery. 

Ed. Brand, 472 Moss Lane E., Manches- 
ter. Eng. 

Wire Springs 

Jas. Steele Limited, Guelph, Ont 

Woodenware 

Wm. Cane, Sons ft Co., Newmarket, Ont 

Wrenches 

Cochran Pipe Wrench Co. 



64 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Does Your Store Look Like a Successful 

Paint Agency? 



Your success and profits in paint and varnish selling are just 
what you make them. We know of small stores in unpromising 
looking localities that are making a lot of money from their 
paint and varnish departments, and we know of others much 
more favorably situated who are failing to make good. 

It's altogether a matter of how intelligently you make use of 
modern selling methods. 



In selecting the make of paint and varnish for your stock, just 
remember that reputation has built more successes than low 
prices. Consider the Sherwin-Williams reputation and then con- 
sider that they are the largest paint and varnish makers in the 
world. That means wide reputation for uniform good quality, 
and successful selling methods — a strong, trade-building combina- 
tion for the Agent. 



A keen, live merchant who appreciates the value of good adver- 
tising and the trade-building force of well-known merchandise, 
cannot fail to be impressed with the possibilities of the Sherwin- 
Williams Agency. It means the opportunity you are looking for. 



We consider good store advertising one of the first essentials of 
successful paint and varnish selling. It's your obligation to your 
business to see that your customers are favorably impressed. 



We have always studied selling problems from the dealers' 
standpoint. In forty years' experience with thousands of mer- 
chants, working under widely varying conditions, wo have de- 
voted special care to the preparation of store advertising which 
would compel favorable attention and impi'ess customers that 
the Sherwin-Williams Agency was the proper place to buy 
reliable paints and varnishes. 



The few photos shown herewith represent very fairly the success 
with w r hich this co-operation has been carried out. They show 
very clearly what can be accomplished by live S.-W. Agents who 
make the most of our help and suggestions in handling and dis- 
playing their paint and varnish departments. 



These stores are _&11 making fine profits from their Sherwin- 
Williams Agency. You can do the same if you will enlist our 
co-operation, provided your territory is still available. 



The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

Canadian Head Offices and Factories: Montreal 
Branch Offices and Warehouses: Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who wtih to sell or buy businesses or 
■tocks, obtain competent help, connect with 
•ntlsfactory positions or secure aid In start- 
ing new enterprises, should not fall to use 
the Want Ad. Advertisement Page of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL. It Is the central mar- 
ket place of the hardware trade throughout 



Canada. There Is always someone some- 
where looking for just such proposition as 
you have to offer. 

RATES— 2c per word first insertion. 

lc per word subsequent Insertion. 

5c additional each insertion when Box 
Number Is required. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



FOR SALE -Hardware, healing and plumbing busi- 
ness in live nwn. Stock small. Owner wants 
to go West. Box 515, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. (24tf) 



FORSALE-Fine new, clean, up-to-date stock of 
hardware, stores, granite and tinware in an ex- 
cellent firming country. Good live town of 4,000. 
Stock about $5,000. Last year's turnover nearly 
$18,000. Owner interested in the West. Box 1086, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. Toronto. (7tf) 



FOR SALE — Old established hardware and coal 
business. Or, one of present proprietors would 
take partner with.some capital. Box 204, Iro- 
quois, Ontario. (27) 

FOR SALE — Hardware, stove and granite business. 
Established thirty years, doing a splendid busi- 
ness, stock will run about seven thousand and in 
fine shape. Yearly turnover twenty thousand ; good 
store, can be rented or bo jght; fine farming country. 
This business will stand closest inspection. At rate 
on the dollar. Wish to retire. D. FERGUSON, 
Teeswater. (16tf) 



WANTED-Five to six thousand dollar hardware 
business in first-class Ontario town in ex- 
change for first-class quarter wheat land in 
Saskatchewan. Box 522, HARDWARE AND METAL, 
Toronto. (28) 



ARTICLES FOR SALE 



FOR Sale.set of tin shop tools In good condition, at 
low price, McCAGUE & WATSON, Stayner, 
Ontario. (27) 



PATTERN DRAWING 



A CHEAP, PRACTICAL and Complete Home 
Study Course on Sheet Metal Pattern Drafting, 
Estimating and Construction. Send for parti- 
culars to THc SHEET METAL SCHOOL, Box 
419, Gait, Ont. (21tf) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



A BOOK-KEEPING STAFF IN ITSELF, doing 
the work with machine precision and accu- 
racy, the National Cash Register. Write for 
demonstration literature. The National Cash 
Register Co., 285 Yonge St., Toronto. 

ACCURATE COST KEEPING IS EASY if you 
have a Dey Cost Keeper. It automatically records 
actual time spent on each operation down to the 
decimal fraction of an hour. Several operations of 
iobs can be recorded on one card. For small firms we 
recommend this as an excellent combination— em- 
ployees' time register and cost keeper. Whether you 
employ a few or hundreds of hands, we can supply you 
with a machine suited to your requirements. Write 
forcatalog. International Time Recording Company 
of Canada, Ltd. Office and factory, 29 Alice Street, 
Toronto. 

COUNTER CHECK BOOKS.— Write us to-day for 
samples. We are manufacturers of the famous 
Surety Non-Smut Duplicating and Triplicating 
Counter Check Books, and Single Carbon Pads In all 
varieties. Dominion Register Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON SYSTEMS — Short, 

simple. Adapted to all classes of business. 

Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto and 
Ottawa. (tf) 

COUNTER Check Books— Especially made for the 
hardware trade. Not made by a trust. Send us 
samples of what you are using, we'll send you right 
prices. Our holder with patent carbon attachment has 
-no equal on the market. Supplies for Binders and 
Monthly Account Systems. Business Systems, Limi- 
ted. Manufacturing Stationers, Toronto. (tf) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



DDING TYPEWRITERS write, add or subtract 
L in one operation. Elliott Fisher. Limited. Room 
314. Stair Rulldlng. Toronto 



BUSINESS GETTING Typewritten Letters and 
Real Printing can be quickly and easily turned 
out by the Multigraph in your own office- 
actual typewriting for letter-forms— real printing for 
stationery and advertising, saving 25 % to 75 % of 
average annual printing cost. American- Multigraph 
Sales Company, Ltd., 129 Bay Street, Toronto. 



DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE — By installing 
an Otis-Fensom handpower elevator you can use 
upper floor as stock room or extra selling space and 
increase space on ground floor. Costs only $70. Write 
catalogue B," Otis-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 



EGRY BUSINESS SYSTEMS are devised to suit 
every department of every business. They are 
labor and time savers. Produce results up to the 
requirements of merchants and manufacturers. In- 
quire from our nearest office. Egry Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio; 123 Bay St., Toronto; 258{^ Portage 
Ave., Winnipeg; 308 Richards St., Vancouver, (tf) 



FIRE INSURANCE. INSURE IN THE HART- 
FORD. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

HUNDREDS OF TYPEWRITERS of every make 
and condition are being traded in as part 
payment on the famous Monarch. Price and 
quality are the levers we use to prevent over stock. 
We believe we can give the best bargains in rebuilt 
typewriters in Canxda. A postal will bring our 
catalogue and full information. The monarch Type- 
writer Co., Limited, 46 Adelaide Street West, 
Toronto. 



MODERN FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION. Our 
system of reinforced concrete work — as success- 
fully used In any of Canada's largest buildings — 
gives better results at lower cost. "A strong state- 
ment," you will say. Write us and let us prove our 
claims. That's fair. Leach Concrete Co., Limited, 
100 King St. West, Toronto. 



MOORE'S NON-LEAKABLE FOUNTAIN PENS. 
If you have Fountain Pen troubles of your own, 
tbe best remedy is to go to your stationer and 
purchase from him a Moore's Non-Leakable Fountain 
Pen. This !s the one pen that gives universal satis- 
faction and it costs no more than you pay for one not 
as good. Price, $2.50 and upwards. W. J. GAGE 
& CO., Limited, Toronto, sole agents for Canada. 



PENS— The very best pens made are those manu- 
factured by William Mitchell Pens, Limited, 
London, England. W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, 
Toronto, are sole agents for Canada. Ask your sta- 
tioner for a 25c. assorted box of Mitchell's Pens and 
find the pen to suit you. 



THE "KALAMAZOO" LOOSE LEAF BINDER 
holds just as many sheets as you actually require 
and no more. Back is flexible, writing surface flat, 
alignment perfect. Cannot get out of order. No 
exposed metal parts or complicated mechanism. 
Write for booklet. Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Ltd., 
King and Spadina, Toronto (tf) 



SITUATIONS WANTED 



EXPERIENCED hardware clerk (married) desires 
position, either wholesale or retail; nine years' 
experience, 4 years in business, good connec- 
tions, A-l references. Apply Box 7, Hensall, Ont. 

(27) 



SITUATIONS VACANT 



w 



AREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING SYS- 
TEMS. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by tbe trade throughout Canada, (tf) 



TRY A CONDENSED AD. 
IN THIS PAPER. 



H 



ARDWARE CLERK. Highest wages to man of 
experience and reliability. T. E. HENDER- 
SHOT, Mount Forest.. (28) 



w 



ANTED — Hardware clerk, experienced, good 
stock keeper Give references and state wages. 
Apply to W.J. HEARD, Fenelon Falls, Ont. 

(29) 



GOOD position for experienced hardwareman who 
could write advertisements and get up attractive 
circulars and booklets. State fully experience, age 
and salary expected. Will keep strictly confidential. 
Box H, Montreal Que. (tf) 



VJT/ANTED— Man capable of doing plumbing and 
" tinsmithing Will pay $25 per wetk for good 
capable man. Write, giving full particulars, to 
H. W. STOREY, Camrose, Alta. (30) 



WANTED — A reliable, ambitious man in every 
town to look after the entire circulation of 
our thirteen publications. Work very remun- 
erative. MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
143-149 University Avenue, Toronto, Ont. (tf) 



SHEET METAL PATTERN DRAWING 



BY the ordinary method of learning by experience 
only it takes a tinsmith from 5 to 10 years to 
learn how to draw patterns for everything in 
sheet metal work, discover the easiest and quickest 
ways of doing things and learn how to estimate on 
work. The lack of this knowledge costs him many 
hundreds and even thousands of dollars in lost wages 
or profits. Ask any old tinsmith if this is not so. 
They did not have your chance of getting a cheap 
practical course in Pattern Drawing, Construction 
and Estimating. Our course gives you this know- 
ledge and, studied in connection with your everyday 
work, it learns you more In six months than the old 
method would learn you in a lifetime. For the month 
of July only we offer this complete Course for $10 
cash. Send for full particulars. This offer closes 
Aug. 1st. AddressTHE SHEET METAL SCHOOL, 
Box 419, Gait, Ont. (30) 



SITUATIONS VACANT 

WANTED — Salesmen to handle 
A-l side line, paying liberal 
commission ; also paying A-l salary 
as soon as you have shown your 
ability. Wanted only A-l represen- 
tatives to answer this advertise- 
ment. Box 517, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto (24tf) 



HARDWARE SALESMAN 

with Al connection in Groat Britain, going' 
there for six months, wishes to handle Can- 
adian Hardware. 

Address Commission 
c/o HARDWARE & METAL, 
(2.9) Montreal. 



G6 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





I- I 



An Artistic, Flat, Washable, Wall Finish. 

Is a bonanza for the paint dealer; it opens an entirely new and 
highly profitable field for the paint store. 

The out-of-date custom of finishing walls with Kalsomine or 
Wallpaper leaves little chance for profit to the dealer, in 
addition the non-permanent qualities of these finishes 
unjustly reflect discredit on the dealer who sells them. 

When a man finishes his walls he expects them to last for 
sometime; naturally at the first appearance of spots or mars 
he will censure the dealer. 

If you carry Neu-tone there will be satisfaction resulting from 
each sale when your customers see the ease with which their 
walls can be cleaned with soap and water. It's a big seller, and 
a sure repeater. The profits are steady. 

We have a Neu-tone proposition open for you. Just advise us 
your name and address — we will tell you the rest. 

The Martin-Senour Co., Limited 



Pioneers oi Pure Paint 






MONTREAL 



CHICAGO 



Varnishes of Quality 

THESE are the kind of varnishes that we make. Varnishes which 
are made to sell, because they are made to stand the wear and to 
give the utmost satisfaction. 

You cannot afford to sell varnish which is cheaply made ; your reputation 
is worth too much. 

DOUG ALL VARNISHES will increase this reputation for you. We 
have a reputation to live up to ourselves and therefore we are particular 
that no varnish leaves our factory unless it is just as good as it is possible 
to make it. 

Have you a copy of our booklet on Varnishes ? We will gladly 
send you one if you will write for it. 

15hQ Dougall VarnisH Company, Limited 

305 Manufacturers Street J. S. N. Dougall, Pres. Montreal, Canada 

Associated with Murphy Varnish Co , U.S.A. 



l>7 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Public Knows 

THE public knows what 
it wantsand asks for the 
merchandise it knows. It 
knows Pratt & Lambert 
Varnishes better than any 
others. It has been made to 
know, so that P. & L. Deal- 
ers might sell more and 
make more profit. 

Are you getting yours? 



Be a P. & L. Dealer. 
There's money in it. 



PRATT & LAMBERT-lnc. 

VARNISH MAKERS 62 YEARS 

24 COURTWRIGHT STREET, BRIDGEBURG, CAN. 

FACTORIES : 

BRIDGEBUBQ, CANADA 

LONDON PARIS HAMBURG NEW YORK BUFFALO CHICAGO 



British Manufacture Throughout. 

The "Fyrout" Fire Extinguisher 



Simple ! 
Durable ! 
Effective ! 
Portable ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 



Application i 




Will 

Extinguish 

Any Kind 

of Fire ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 

Application 



There is no cure for fire — 

Only Prevention 

Full Descriptive List will be sent on application to 

The Valor Company, Limited 

Aston Cross, Birmingham, England 

Or--GEO. H. SAYWELL, SASKATOON 




DO YOU BELIEVE 

IN— 
THE "HORSE SHOE FAIRY TALE? 



Miracles do not happen in business, yet — lots of 
otherwise sensible men believe in Luck. 

They will tell you that things happen — that the 
successful man is the lucky man. But getting down 
to brass tacks, you know perfectly well that nothing 
happens. 

You know that success is the result of certain 
causes — 

Causes so obvious that believers in the "Horse 
Shoe" fairy tale pass through life without noting 
them. 

90 per cent, of the successful Hardware Merchants 
do not believe in luck — 

They use "Buying Sense" instead. 

And stock the lines which mean profit and reputa- 
tion for them — International Varnish Products. 

"EL.ASTICA" Floor Finish — the one perfect floor 
finish — the durable, beautiful, waterproof finish that 
never turns white or cracks. 

"LACQCERET" — the Household Beautifier— a prime 
necessity in every home. 

"SATINETTE" White Enamel — the enamel that stays 
white — made for both interior and exterior work. 

FEATTINE FINISH— the finish that produces a full 
dead or flat appearance without the labor and ex- 
pense of rubbing. 

KXEARSTONE Stains (Acid or Oil)— the perfect 
wood stains. 

Every International product you sell adds to your 
reputation and increases your bank balance at the 
same time. 

N.B. — All International Varnish Products are ' 
sold in full Imperial Measure cans. 




TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 

A22 



(58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



fe/ 



^ 



Quality plus 
Advertising plus You 

These are the three biggest 
factors in the success of Berry 
Brothers' Varnishes. 

They are the three things we center 
our attention upon above all others. 

We believe in the DEALER. We 
recognize his importance in the success of 
our business. 

And we believe the best support we 
can give him is to produce good varnish 
and make it known to the public by big 
advertising. 

That's why you and your trade see the 
good, familiar Berry Brothers' label stand- 
ing out prominently in the pages of the 
leading magazines. 

Is that same label prominent on your 
shelves ? 

Berry Brothers' 
Business Builders 

The Big-4 with which every 
dealer can most easily satisfy the 
quality-demands of his trade. 



For finisbine floors in the most For the finest rubbed or polish- 

durable manner possible. ed finish on interior wood-work. 



LASTic_lN1TRI0 

■ rTNIsS • 

For interior wood-work ex- 
posed to severe wear and finished 
in the full floss 



ASTic_ouTS|D| 

riNlsri 

For front doors and all other 
surfaces exposed to the weather. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 

The World's Largest Varnish Makers 

Walkerville, Ont. 



Why Buy the "Near Brand" when 
the Best is Procurable ? 

THE L. MARTIN CO.'S 

Old Standard, Eagle, Pyramid and Globe 

GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACK 

IS THE BEST 

AND HAS BEEN FOR OVER SIXTY YEARS 

Sold by all dealers who realize that a satisfied customer is 
worth more than a little extra profit on a less reliable article. 

The L. MARTIN GO. 

yi Manufacturer* of the 

\')ij\ Highest Standard Lampblacks 

y r for all purposes 

-0S ASK YOUR DEALER 

Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA CINCINNATI LONDON, EMS; 





BRUSHES 



NEW LINES 



Very attractive values. 
Better finished than ever. 

SEE THEM BEFORE YOU BUY. 

Manufactured by 

Stevens-Hepner Co., Limited 

PORT ELGIN - - ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Moore's 
House Colours 



One of the famous MOORE LINE, made in Canada. These colours have 

for years held their own against a host of rivals because of the purity of 

their ingredients, and the care and skill used in their manufacture. The 

retailer gets a first-class paint at a reasonable price, because we don't 

spend immense sums on magazine advertising. Our policy is to put all 

the money into the paint and to leave it to advertise itself. If you are 

not yet handling the MOORE LINE we would like to send you colour 

card and prices. A trial order will convince the most sceptical. 

Write to us to-day. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 

WEST TORONTO 




New York 



Cleveland 



Chicago 



r &RARMS(b 



€J Right in every hardware store is the most logical place for a line of reliable, accurate, and moder- 
ate-priced single guns. 

For ridding premises of pests — snakes, rats, 'chucks and the many kinds of crop and poultry de- 
stroyers, the Harrington & Richardson single guns are specially suited. 

€J There is a large and growing demand for an economical and efficient weapon for just that purpose, 
as well as for occasional hunting. 



Here's the gun 





TRADE 




Specifications, 12 to 28 gauge— 26 to 32 inch barrel— electing op non-ejecting— f:ne black walnut stock— hard 
rubber butt plate— weight S% to 6% lbs., according to gauge and barrel. For black or smokeless powder. 

CJ These guns are quick sellers. They are made and sold under the broad H. & R. guarantee of quality, 
reliability and satisfaction. With a few of these H. & R. guns in stock, the hardware dealer is 
equipped for a profitable and increasing trade. 

Our 40-page catalogue is yours for the asking. It contains valuable selling points for every hard- 
ware dealer and shows the complete H. & R. line. Ask for it now while you think of it. 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., SJCSJ.'SS 



70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




This 

Trade Mark 

Ensures 

Genuineness 

Originality 

Perfection 

Satisfaction 



OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery, 6d. 

and la. Canister*. 

•WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEV & SONS, Limited 

Manirfacfrufi of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery* Glass 
and Flint C loths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 




New Era Paint 



IS AN EXCELLENT STOCK PAINT 

It stays in condition and when sold gives greater 
satisfaction than others. 

Its surface-covering qualities are above the average 
and it wears splendidly. 

The] result is a steady and increasing demand for 
New A Era Paints, which it will pay you to supply. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Works Co. 

WINDSOR limited ONTARIO 



Carbon Black Elastic Paint 

A SPECIAL ROOF PAINT 

LEAK PROOF AND FIRE RET ARDENT 

Can be put on Felt, Tar-paper, Gunnysack, Shingles, Metal or any other material. 

Will not Crack in Winter or Meit in Summer. 

A most popular article that shows good profits to the merchant. 

Write and we will send our traveller. 

Stocks on hand at Calgary, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto. 

The Carbon Oil Works, Ltd. 



WINNIPEG 



HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG, CANADA 
Manufacturers of C.O.W.L. BRAND Paints, Stains, 
Wax Oils, and Oils -of -Tar, Specialties, etc. 



CANADA 



/*^|NE of the most successful 
retailers of late years 
says : "When a firm advertises 
in trade papers it is getting 
into good company. As I pick 
up one of a dozen of these 
periodicals here in my office, 
and glance through it, I find 
that the best people, the suc- 
cessful firms, are represented 
in such a way as to reflect 
their importance in the trade." 

— 



THE WANT AD. 



The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the "want ad" as a matter of 
course for a hundred small ser- 
vices. 

The want ad. gets work for 
workers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and 
finds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The "want ad." is the great 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of daily life. 



When writing advertisers kindly men- 
tion having seen the advertisement in 
this paper. 



J 1 A HI ) W A 1{ E AND M E T A L 



Learn wisdom by 
the follies 
of others. 



Many dealers, dazzled by the pro- 
spect of a big first profit, recommend a 
certain article regardless asto whether 
or not that article will give a customer 
the greatest possible satisfaction. 

This shortsightedness has proved 
fatal to many a dealer. Unless a 
customer is thoroughly satisfied, your 
chances for his future trade are small ; 
but the greater his satisfaction the surer 
you are of his steady trade. 

It's the cumulative value of a sale 
that counts — that's why 

^ It pays to sell the FORD 

Auger Bit in preference to all others. 

P, It gives MAXIMUM satisfaction every 
I time in every way. Your profit may 
- not be quite as large on the first sale — 
but Sure repeat sales win 

boost the total profit away over and 
above that obtained by "Onetime 
large profit" sales. 

If you, Mr. Dealer, are following 
on this latter plan In your Auger Bit 
trade, just try pushing the FORD, and 
note carefully the result. It will con- 
vert the occasional buyer into a steady 
customer and make every buyers satis- 
tied customer. 

Dealers who have tried this know It 
to be a fact. Will you be the next ? 

Write us for catalog aad circulars. 

Ford Anger Bit Co. 

HOLYOKE MASS. 



Are you lnterea*o<t In any of a/ie 
llnmm that are aarVert/atetf 7 

A Pomt Card will brlna ymu pr«M 
llmt and full Information 

Don't forgot to montton this 
paper 



CANADIAN NATIONAL 
EXHIBITION 

August 26th TORONTO Sept. 11, 1911 

Greatest exhibits of Manufactures, Machinery, 
etc., on the continent. 

CORONATION YEAR ATTRACTIONS 

Festival of Empire, Band of Coldstream Guards. 
Coronation Year Fireworks. 



FOR INFORMATION WRITE— 



GEO. H. GOODERHAM, M.P-P. 
President 



J. O. ORR 
Secretary 



;- 1 SCYrVlOLR SHEARS 



ISEYMOUR 

•mIkf" CO, , have been the Standard for over seventy years. 

i^nyY^r^y "QUALITY UNQUESTIONED" 

Baob D»lr o( oar (bear* bears tht above trade nark 



Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERb 
BARBERS' and TAILORS' SHEARS, etc., etc, 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY 




seymour' 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



Latest sstslot 
wlll be sent io 
exthaage for 
your business 
esrd. 



WIEIUSCR* HIL6ER. LIMITED. feEW TOM, Agent*. 



ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 



BRASS RAILINGS 



MADE TO 
ORDER 



THE BOOTH-COULTER COPPER & BRASS CO., LIMITED 



Coppersmiths and Brass Founders, 



TORONTO. ONT. 



Grade 
Hardware 





Progressive retailers throughout the country sell our hardware, 
because it is profitable to handle and is guaranteed by a reliable house 
with a reputation for making only quality goods. 

They cost no more than inferior articles and are more durable and 
serviceable. 

We are the oldest and largest makers of Builders' Hardware in Canada. 



Cowan £§» Britton/ :: Gananoque, Ont. 



72 




HARDWARE AND METAL 
THIS LABEL GUARANTEES GENUINE TINWARE 

fJ-H 

DDOE 




"ANTI-BUST" 



and appears on EVERY piece of 
GENUINE CANADIAN "ANTI- 
RUST" TINWARE. 



Produced at HAMILTON, ONT. 
LOOK FOR THE LABEL 




E. T. WRIGHT &t CO., Hamilton, Canada 

(H. G. WRIGHT) 
Winnipeg distributing agents, Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Man.; Vancouver distributing agents, Macpherson & Teetzel, Van- 
couver, B.C.; Winnipeg agents, W. Reynolds & Co., Winnipeg, Man; Toronto agent, F. B. Wilson, 33 Maitland St , Toronto, Ont. 



MAPLE LEAF 

"Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 




This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the wide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN* ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF" 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO 



and 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 



This Combination Makes the Safest Shaving Outfit Ob- 
tainable — Boker's "Radium" Finest Concaved Razor 

With Adjustable Guard 





With one of these guards 
and a Boker Razor you 
have a shaving outfit that 
will last a lifetime- Im- 
possible r to cut yourself 
with this'guard. 




Fits every Boker Razor, 
made of German Silver 
Nickel Plated. Neatest 
and most substantial 
Razor Guard on the mar- 
ket. 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



73 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





ORNAMENTALS 

: ( IR^JVORK 

WIRE GOODS 



PERFORATED METALS 
GENUINE ANTIQUE 
BRONZE FLY SCREEN CLOTH 



Canada Wire Goods Mfg. 

HAMILTON. ONT. 



Co 



&s(ds&/&A K bxc>Tvoj\fe) 




Convenient- 



Profitable 

HEAVY 
STEEL 

HOG 
TROUGH 



This high-grade galvanized steel trough is made from selected 
metal, and is absolutely rivetless. It is unexcelled in quality and 
quick-selling ability by any other trough manufactured. 
Write for full details arnt prices 




ERIE IRON WORKS, Ltd., 



ST. THOMAS, 
ONTARIO 



British America Assurance Company 

A.D. 1833 
FIRE A. MARINE 

Head Office, Toronto 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

Hon. Goo A. Cox, President W. R. Brook, Vloo-Prstldont 

Rob.n Blekerdlke, M.P., W. B. Melkle, E. W Co.. Goo. A. Morrow 

D. B. Hiom, Augustus Myari, John Hotkin, K.C., LL.D. 
Fredcrlo Nloholli, Alex. Lslrd, Jtmei Kerr Osbornt, Z. A. Lain, K.C. 

Sir Hsnry M. Pollitt, E. R. Wood. 
W, b. Mmikim, Omneral Manaamr/ P. H. Slmm, Smermtary 

CAPITAL .... 51.400, 000.00 

ASSETS 2,162,753.85 

LOSSES PAID SINCE ORGANIZATION 29.533.820.96 



ARE 
YOU 
ALIVE 



To the possibilities which a Want 

Ad. in Hardware and Metal 

holds for you ? Do you know that 
for a few cents you can gain the 
attention of every hardware re- 
tailer, wholesaler, manufacturer and 
clerk in Canada ? 

RATES : payable in advance. 
2C. per word first insertion, 
ic. per word subsequent insertions. 
5c. extra if box number is desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

TORONTO - MONTREAL- WINNIPEG 



The EUREKA 



is the best tool for digging post holes 
any size. Also for sinking posts 
heaved by frost. It cuts off roots — 
lifts out stones, etc. —works in sand, 
clay, gravel or muck. If your jobber 
will not supply them, write us. 

We also make Wire Stretchers for 
building Wire Fences, Drive Well 
Points, Drive Caps,Shoes, Cylinders 
and Pumps. 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Limited 



OTTERVILLE. 



ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Special Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Aoourately Machined 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



MONTREAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES 

TORONTO 

CANADA 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 
ROBMLAND 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. limited 

Avoid imitations of our ^cO£D Tr?/\/)c- . 



CUTLERY * 



** 



«Sf 



By seeing that this exact 

mark is on each blade. ^RAhlTcn \fo^ 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton £§» Company 

MONTREAL 



A Strong Selling Point 




This combination Nut and Pipe Wrench has a 

very strong selling point— Double Efficiency 

Its handiness and strength at once appeal to the good mechanic to 

save him time and trouble. You can sell a lot of these Wrenches— 

make a start by writing to-day for our catalog. 

BEMIS & CALL HARDWARE & TOOL GO. 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 




74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BLACK JACK 

THE BEST FAMILY POLISH MADE 



TRY IT. 



BuAGK JACK 



SOLD BY 

ALL 
JOBBERS 



~-i. Ar * STOVE S'OI 



H'-lb tins— 3 doi. la iuc 



Galvanized Fence 
Hooks 





For fastening wooden pickets *4 x 1% on jwire fences. 
Prompt shipment. Our hooks are perfectly" made* and 
hence no waste. Also, tools for applying. Also, wire 
locks and wire stays and tools for same. 

The Page Wire Fence Co., Limited 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 

BRANCHES : Toronto, Cor. King St. W. and Atlantic'Ave. : Montreal 
50S-517 Notre Dame St. West ; St. John. N.B., 37 Dock St. 



WOOD SCREWS 




The 20th Century 

Patent Socket Head Screws Drive Easier, 

Drive Quicker, Never Slip Driver. 
Send us an order and glvo them a trial. 

RIVETS, BURRS, WASHEjRS 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton, Out. 



W 



ESTERN 



Incorporated 
1851 

ASSURANCE 
COMPANY 



FIRE 

AND 

MARINE 



HEAD OFFICE, TORONTO, ONT. 

Assets over - - - - $3,570,000 
Income for 1906, over 3,609,000 

HON. GEO. A. COX, President 

W. R. BROCK, Vice-PreaUUnt 

W. B. MEIKLE. General Manager 

C. C POSTER, SocrsMuy 



We carry the largest assort- 
ment in Canada of 

BRASS ROD BRASS TUBING 
SHEET BRASS 

and can make prompt deliveries from stock. 



When in the market for 



Glues, Gelatines, Size, Etc. 

you often have to order goods without 
having time to get quotations, etc. Get 
our lists now, and keep them on file. 

Supplied through Merchants, Jobbers, etc., only. 

The GROVE CHEMICAL CO., LTD. 

ESTABLISHED 1856 Appley Bridge, Wigan, Lanes., England 



WALL PLASTER 

THE "EMPIRE" BRANDS MANU- 
FACTURED ONLY BY 

The Manitoba Gypsum Co. 

LIMITED 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 

O.K. THIMBLES 




These Thimbles sre easily adjusted and cannot jet out of order becsuse 
they hsve no sprints. They ire the only real food Stove Pipe Thimbles 
is the market. For ssle by leading jobbers, and manufactured exclu- 
sively by 



METAL SHINGLE & SIDING C? LTD. 

PRESTON C MONTREAL 



75 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost daily, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, manufacturers and retail dealers, who usually intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure the information at once. This page enables manu- 
facturers to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS. 



FIRE BRICK. 



Battery Zincs, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

The CANADA METAL CO., LTD . 
31 William St., Toronto 



BOLTS. 



Carriage Bolts, Machine Bolts, Coach 
Screw*, S. & S. Hingee, Cross Arm 
Braees and Pins, Pole Steps, Nuts, etc. 
Plain and galvanized. Ask for prices. 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 

London, Canada 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Ball Phone SMS 



P. O. Box 367 



Bosse £& Banks 

Steel Biimi, Column*. Plataa, Oaa and 

Water Plpaa, Centraetora*. Municipal 

and Bulldart' Supplies. Machinery 

and Specialties, 

Board of Trada Building 

99 St. Paul St., - QUEBEC 



CHAPLETS. 




ERIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

All Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S.Ctieney&Son, Mantius, N.Y. 



0LXFP2&S. 



FRinsrs clipper*, j 
P%$ THArS 
SUFFICIENT 

SKKO TO* C1TAIXKWX TO 
America* Shearer Mtg. Co . Kukiu, *JB%DS/ 
Webaeh A Hilger, Limited, special New York 
RepreeecitaUTes. loeVHO Lafayette Street 







EMERY WHEELS. 




Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

442 Barton St. Eaat, Hamilton 

Corundum and Emery Wheel* 

Grinding Miohlnee, Bssrer 

Oil Stone*. 



Silica Bricks, Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
Silica Cement, Ganister Composition 

For material graded to withstand the in- 
tensest heat or moderate heat, apply to 

A. Y. DINAS SILICA BRICK & LIME CO.. LTD. 
118. Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland 



FILTERS. 




fAlVO FILTER 6 STERILIZER 



ANTI 
SPLASH' 

FILTERS Plain or Screw 
Writ fo. dbefa. 

Filler Co 

Ont 



Owen 



FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Beat Door Closer Is 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

W1U oloee a door silently against any pressure of wind 
Has many working adTantaga* orer the ordinary spring 
and has twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
and ttM colonies. (Mreaperfeot satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS 
Hospital St. .... Birmingham [ 



GAS CONTROLLERS. 



WHITE FOR NEW PRICES 
ON GAS CONTROLLERS 

Canadian Gas Users' 

Association 
633-635 Queen Street W. 
TORONTO 
Eastern Repre.— J. S. Mullen, 
1749 Park Aye. , Montreal, Que. 
Western Repre. — The Moffat 
Store Co., Ltd., 248 Princess 
Street, Winnipeg, Man. 




HORSE POKES. 




Our Surprise Horse 
and Cattle Halter 
Pokes are the best. 

Manufactured by 

James & Reid 

Perth, Oat. 



IRON AND STEEL. 



IRON and STEEL 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 
Brass, Copper, Zinc, etc 

David C. Mitchell & Company, 

118 Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland. 

76~~ 



LAMP BLACK. 



L. MARTIN COMPANY 

The world's largest manufacturers "f 

lacks 

02 years' reputation behind every nackuge. 

-;»6 our quart er.pagead>'-rtis>-mei it appearing eri'r; 

alternate issue of " Hardware X Metal. 

New York Philadelphia Cincinnati Londoo, Eng. 



MALLEABLE IRON. 



Malleable Iron Castings 

Carriage and Agricultural Castings, 
Axle Nuts, etc, etc 

Manufactured by 
P. RYLE, Merrickwille, Ontario 
Catalogue furnished on application 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 

Wholesale Commission Merchant! and 
Manufacturers' Agents. Cars Distribut- 
ed, Warehoused and Forwarded. Ware- 
house on Transfer Track. Business 
solicited. 

OCR POSITION IS TOUR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 
SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA. 



MOOSE JAW 

Whitlock & Marlatt 

Distributing and Forwarding Agents 

Warehouse on C.P.R. spur track 

NOirTNEIS sad SATISFACTION GUAIANTMD 

BuHlnoas Solicited. 



J AS. BISSET & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 
260 St. Paul St., QUEBEC, QUE. 

Cars distributed, warehoused and 
forwarded. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
18 6t. John Street, Montreal 



Representing < anadiao, British and American 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing to be represented. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLOW CASTINGS. 



Castings of all Kinds. 

Write us for our list of 
Plow Castings. 

The Hilborn Co., Ayr, Ontario. 



RIVETS AND STEEL PRODUCTS. 



Tb« PABMBNTEH BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 

OANAKOQUE, ONT. 

Ir«a and Copper RIt«u, Iron tad Copper Burn, 
Blrurcattd and Tubular Rlrttt, Wire Nalli, 
Copper aad Steel Boil aad Caaoe N.lle, 
Baeateheoa Pine, Leather Shoe and Orerehoe 
Baeklee, Pelloo Pletee. 



SHELF BRACKETS. 




'Will Hold Up a Shelf 



That's what a shelf brac- 
ket's for. For this pur- 
» .. pose there can be Nothing 

Better, Nothing Cheaper than the 
Bradley Steel Bracket. It is well 
Japanned, Strong and Light. The 
saying on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which 
the goods are sold. Order direct or 
through your Jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., NEW HAVEN 



SPRAYERS. 



a 



Sprayers 



n 



Our 1911 Sprayers are better than ever, 
four different kinds this year, to suit all 
tastes and purposes. You ought to see our 
new whirlwind or continuous sprayer it's 
a comer. A post card will bring a cata- 
logue. Manufactured by 
THE COLLINS MFG. CO. - TORONTO 



STANCHIONS 



OK CANADIAN U BAR STEEL 

Stanchions and Stalls 

are guaranteed not to let the cattle 
loose, and are absolutely sanitary. 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co., Limited 



208 Stone Road 



Gait, Out. 



TIMBER JACKS. 



TREWHELLA BROS. 

AUSTRALIAN MONKEY JACKS 

for clearing land of TREES, ROOTS and STUMPS 

Theyaresimple, powerful, 
reliable, ex editious. A 
necessary tool lor every 
farmer. 

TREWHELLA BROS 

9 Alma 8»reet, Smethwick, 
Birmingham, Kng , and Trentham Victoria, Ausc, 




TOOL HOLDERS. 



ARMSTRONG UNIiERSU 

RATCHET 
Two Inches of moiion 
»t end of handle. In 
any direction, 
will drive the 
drill 





Armstroof 
Bros. Tool Go. 

106 N. Francisco 
Ave., Chicago, TJ. 3. A 




TRUCKS 

Watson's Trucks 

Every Factory, Mill, Whole- 
sale or Retail Store and 
Warehouse in your locality 
requires Trucks. 
We make Trucks for every 
purpose. Catalogue and PriceB 
for the asking. 

John Watson Mfg. Co., Limited, 

Ayr, Ont. Winnipeg, Man. 




WIRE SPRINGS. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 

WIRE SPRINGS 

for COMPRESSION and EXTENSION 

James Steele, Limited, Guelph 



CHARLES LINDSAY 

Rumford Works, 33 Great Hamilton Street 
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Manufacturer of all classes Brass and Copper 
Kerbs, Fire Irons, Coal Vases, Interior Grates, Etc., 
Etc. Write for Catalogue 

Canadian Representative — H. L. SOPER 
Post Office Box 1975 - - - WINNIPEG 



CLOTHES WRINGERS. 



The Estate of O. D. COWAN 

GANANOQUE, ONTARIO 

CLOTHES WRINGERS- 1 to 3 years' guarantee 
FLEXIBLE DRAG TOOTH HARROWS 

Agent! (Aist III &, McMastir. 207 St. Jamts St. Montreal 
I J. A. Glrird, Quebec, Que. 



SHELF BOXES. 



Goods Well Displayed areHalf Sold ! 

■> The most attractive.most dup. 
j able and most serviceable shelf 
box on the market i» the 

BENNETT STEEL 

HARDWARE SHELF BOX 

OVtr MAlrfn boMt 

wr.te far Catalogue and fVirtli*. 



m0Z 



C#MER.OH m* CAMPBELL 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 
6 COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.8. 

Manufacturers of 

FE Ft RON A 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 



Just the Tool for Inexperienced Glass Cutters 




Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 

Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained in a great variety of patterns from Dealers in 
Glass, Hardware and Painters' Supplies. 

GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK C^"*^ 9 Woo ' ,mn p/c * ets on 

fENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



London, Ont. 



Two Cents per Word 



You can talk across the continent for 
two cents per word in a Hardware and 
Metal Want Ad. 



77 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




The "FRUIT KNIFE" of Quality 

This Handsome Fruit Knife is made in 3 grades — 12, 6 and 2 dwt. — 
and is put up in an elegant white satin-lined box. Better send for our 
descriptive catalogue and prices. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls, Ont. 

AGENTS: -J. Mackay Rose. 88 McGill St.. Montreal • N. F. GUNDY. 61 Albert St.. Toronto: David Philip, 291 Portage Ave.. Winnipeg. 




Maxwell's "Blue Belle" Washer 

is easily the best of its type. The upper rubbing board re- 
volves in one direction while the tub, with its rubbing sur- 
faces, turns the opposite way, making it wash very fast. 
Powerful coil springs underneath the tub keep it going with 
very little effort on the part of the operator. A feature of 
the "BLUE BELLE" is that there is nothing about it 
which can possibly tear the clothes. Tub made of Red 
Cypress and finished in fine style. 

DAVID MAXWELL & SONS, ST. MARY'S, Ont. 



More-Profit Pumps 
—Real Profit 



No use to sell a pump that makes 
trouble for a dealer with his customer. 

The trouble is remembered. The cost 
of repairs is dead loss 
of time and temper. 
The dealer suffers. 

"Aremacdee" hand 
and motor metal 
pumps for force or 
lift use, every kind, 
are shown in the big 
catalogue. 

Dealers, ask for prices and terms. Get 
real profits on your metal pump sales. 

The R. McDOUGALL GO., Limited 

CALT, CANADA 




BELT PERFECTION 



MAPLE LEAF' 



Brand 



Stitched Cotton 

Duck Belting 
Makes Business 





TRADE COMES WITH CONFI- 
DENCE. WHY ? 
Because "MAPLE LEAF " costs much 
less than leather, rubber or Balata belt- 
ing, is stronger and more efficient, 
and its durability has been thoroughly 
demonstrated. 

We give the dealers every help possible 
in securing and holding belting business. 

DOMINION BELTING GO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON CANADA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



N 
O 
T 
E 

T 
H 
E 

P 

O 

I 

N 
T 
S 



BANNER 



COLD 
BLAST 



LANTERN 



THE "SUPER-SUPERIOR" 

NOTE THE POINTS Q BOOST THE SALES 



PATENT WELL OF 
EXTRA CAPACITY 

(15 hours longer burning) 

AIR CHAMBER 

SEAMED NOT 

SOLDERED 

PATENT LIFT LOCK 

HEAVILY 

REINFORCED 

SUPERIOR FINISH 




WIND PROOF 
LEAK PROOF 
FOOL PROOF 

SOLD BY ALL 
JOBBERS 

Manufactured by 

Ontario Lantern & 
Lamp Co., Limited 

Hamilton .:. Ontario 






B 
O 
O 
S 
T 

T 
H 
E 

S 
A 
L 
E 
S 



A Guarantee of Absolute Quality Perfection 

is possible in our product, to the exclusion of other makes, by the fact that in 
our chain the weld is actually the strongest part of the link. 



The swell 

guarantees 

the weld. 




The ewell 

guarantees 

the wold. 



The chain illustrated above was pulled perfectly rigid with a stock break, after which the 
welds were hammered flat in an endeavour to part the welds or show any defects. 



Office; 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



McKinnon Chain Co. 



Factory t 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



THE 



MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Manufacturer* of 



COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 



For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kind* of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250 



79 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON AND STEEL 

Bars, Hoops, Angles, Beams, Channels, etc. 

Galvanized and Black Sheets, all grades. 

Tinplates Canada Plates 

METALS 

Antimony, Copper, Tin, Lead, Zinc. 

PIG IRON 



M. <8h L. Samuel, Benjamin ®> Co. 



Corner King Street and Spodina A venae 

Toronto 





The up-to-date builder demands the BEST 

LOCK. The "National" Brand is the strongest, 

safest and most durable rim lock made — the 

highest quality of steel being used in its manufacture. 

WRITE FOR PRICES 

National Hard-ware Co., Ltd. 

ORILLIA, ONTARIO, CANADA 



A FESTAURANT NEEDS 

An Attractive Urn 



OUR RESTAURANT URNS 
are very attractive, conven- 
ient and up-to-date. 



We are constantly receiving 
orders direct from high- 
class Hotels, Cafes, and 
Restaurants, Scores of the 
repeat orders which we have 
on hand prove the reliability 
and efficiency of our High 
Grade Urns. 

Be wide awake and keep 
them in stock. They are 
not expensive— you will 
have a reasonable profit and 
a quick seller. Satisfied 
customers will increase 
your business. 

Write at once for full 
information. 

THEIBUFFALO 
MFG.iGO.,|Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives 

H. F. Mcintosh & Co.. 
28 Toronto St., Toronto 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Pink's 
Lumbering 

Tnols 

Made in Canada 

The Standard Tools 
in every province 
of the Dominion, 
New Zealand, 
Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all 
kinds of lumber 
tools. 

Light and Durable 

Send for catalogue 

and price list. 

Long Distance 

Phone No. 87 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 




Thii 



Trade 



o 



Mark 



Stand* for Quality 
and Accuracy 




Mark 



Stands for Quality 
and Accuracy 



For Absolute Accuracy 



Always Demand 



a 



W & B-DIAMOND" REAMERS 



Made in all styles and sizes from Carbon Steel or the latest improved VANADIUM high speed steel, carefully tempered, and will 
give greater service than any others on the market. Every " W & B-Diamond " Reamer must conform to micrometer measure- 
ments as it passes through the various operations of manufacture and is subjected to the most rigid test9 and inspections. 

. We carry the largest and most complete stock of Twist Drills and Reamers in Canada and make instant shipment. 

The Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 

81 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Profitable Saws 

We offer the ambitious merchant the most profitable Saw proposi- 
tion in the world. Ours is not a campaign with the object of 
securing your order at any cost or by any means 

A SELLING PLAN 

But is a carefully worked out plan whereby we work together to 
build business for each other. It's co-operative and profitable 
"We help You to Sell" and then we expect re-orders. Write us 
for full information. 

We make Hand Wood, Panel, Rip and Small Saws, Cross-Cuts 
Metal Saws. A Perfect Saw for Every Purpose. 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 




No. 190 



Hamilton, Ont. 



MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 



U.S. Factory, Indianapolis, Ind 



WHEELBARROWS 

for Every Purpose 

We have so many different styles — Bar- 
rows for Railroad or Canal Construc- 
tion, Garden and Farm, Stone, Metal, 
Mortar, Contractors', Concrete, Etc, Etc. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 
THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD. 

London - Canada 
Toronto Warehouse, 1 9 Jarvic St., F. J. Schuch, Agen 




Have the Agency 
in Your Town for the 



Simonds 



" Crescent 
Ground " 



Cross-Cut Saws 




It will mean a good seller for you. The Saws can be purchased through your jobber or from any of our 
offices. Good profit and quick sales. You are at liberty to guarantee Simonds "Crescent Ground" Cross- 
Cut Saws to cut 10 per cent, more timber, same time and labor being used, than any other Cross-Cut Saw 
in the world. 

SIMONDS CANADA SAW CO., Limited, Montreal, P.Q. St. John,N.B. Vancouver, B.C. 

82 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




COIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, STEAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 
EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 
Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents : ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL 



Get Our Prices and Get to Thinking, That Is All We Ask 

TH IS MANTEL 

Is Artistic, Ornamental and Substantial. 90 other designs of 
the same quality. Gas and Coal Grates and Fireplace Fittings, 
also a complete line of Gas and Electric Fixtures. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 
Test us, every test is one more triumph. 

OUR TRADE EXTENDS FROM COAST TO COAST 

The Barton Netting Company, Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 




THE CONNOR BALL-BEARING WASHER 

Withthehinged 
cover now used 
on this Washer 
it is no longer 
necessary for 
the operator to 
place the cover 
and rubbing 
board dripping 
wet onto the 
kitchen floor. 
With this hing- 
ed rubber and 
cover the water 
drips back into 
the machine. It 
is easily han- 
dled. And other 
features of this 
machine are a 
detachable tub; 
no iron running 
through the bot- 
tom of the tub; 
Cypress Tubs: 
nicely finished 
Ball - Bearings 
and Motor Springs do most of the work. 

Have you the agency for this washer? If not, write at 
once for sample, prices, terms, etc. You will find it the 
most satisfactory machine you ever handled. 




J. H. CONNOR & SON, LTD., 

Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Agents for Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta. Geo. D. Horsman, 838 Granville St., Vancouver, Agent for 
British Columbia. 



Manufacturers. 
OTTAWA 



A Common Sense Talk 



AIR IS CHEAP. You do not pay rates for air like you do for water, yet 
a big fuss is made over the impurity of water and very often no thought is 
taken of the impurity of the air breathed from day to day and night to night- 
Crowded rooms, whether in public places, schools, opera houses or 
factories, require ventilation as well a* the private dwellings. 
House Building is a Science Nowadays and no Building is Complete 
Without one of our J. W. Harris Ventilators. 

The Ventilator Itself is an Ornament 
and can be made to suit the character of the 
building, either as to size or as to quality 
of material. 

Montreal, Dec 4th, 1905 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd 

City 
Dear Sirs,— 

In answer to your letter of the 25th ult. . I 
must say that I am very much satisfied with the 
results of the"ZEPHYR" Ventilators. 

Yours truly, 
W. Champagne, 

191 St. Paul St. 

Dealers everywhere will find a double profit 
in handling this ventilator. Write direct 
for catalogue and booklet to-day. 

Learn about our system of ventilating. A 
pleasure to sand books. 

The J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Genaral Contractors and Manufacturers 

Montrea I 




83 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Not Yet— But Soon 

One hates to mention Autumn when the crops are only sprout- 
ing, but nevertheless NOW is the time to order your supply of 

"ROSS" RIFLES 

Display them in your window and secure the "early trade,' 
which even now is preparing for the fall Big Game. 

Discounts and full information on request. 

The Ross Rifle Co., Quebec, P.Q. 




Armstrong Ratchets 

The Best and Most Complete Line Made 

Made entirely from Drop Forgings and Bar Steel. 

Hardened all over — Outwear Two of the Soft Kind. 




-■ " ■ - ' 

ARMSTRONG 5H0RT RATCHET 



SHORT RATCHET 
For Morse Taper. 



Each Ratchet 
is packed in a 
Cardboard Box. 



UNIVERSAL RATCHET 




DEALERS ! 



Do you want the 
Best Made, Best 
Packed and Best 
Advertised 
Ratchets? 



PACKER 




LET US SEND YOU A CATALOG 



"STANDARD" REVER 
SIBLE RATCHETS 



"Hard-to-Please" 
USERS prefer 
ARMSTRONG 
RATCH ETS 



They stand 
the racket. 




Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. 

"The Toot Holder People." 

306 N. Francisco Avenue, Chicago 
U. S. A. 




84 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Uniformity of Quality 
Prompt Delivery 

Adaptability 
Standard Weight 

Points to remember in connec- 
tion with Canada Cement when 
making - specifications. 

Canada Cement Co. 

Limited 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY 



Quality talks 

and talks so forcibly when deal- 
ing with axe handles that you 
can afford to sell none other but 



STILLS 



AXE HANDLES 

the "quality" handles 

You will find them uniformly 
finished, well balanced and well 
shaped, and we guarantee that 
only the most carefully selected 
and seasoned timber is used in 
their manufacture. 

Write for Prices. 

J. H. STILL MFG. CO., Ltd 

ST. THOMAS, ONTARIO 






Salem 



Kingston 



Morrow 



U' 



'New Designs" 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. twiw 
PETERBOROUGH ONTARIO 







Irwin 



Avon 



Stratton 



"New\ Designs" 

See Our 1911^Supplement 

CANADA 



/(JF'JCiM Measuring Tapes 

are to-day recognized as the Standards of Accuracy, Design 
and Workmanship. Each is made to sustain the Reputation 
gained by a Quarter Century's endeavor. Used by all experi- 
enced consumers. The wise merchant has them for sale. 



SOLD BY ALL JOBBERS 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



7V E/l/FKfN fti/LEf?Q. DfQaNADA.Lt1>. 
W/NDSO/LONT. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



1868 




loc 1845. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Co. 



Twelve 



PHILADELPHIA 




Medal* 



Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1891 

Copy of cata- 
logue sent free 
to any inter- 
ested file user 
upon applies* 
tion 




PIG 
LEAD 



We can quote you the 

lowest prices on large 

or small lots. 

Send Us Your Enquiries. 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Co. 



LIMITED 

MONTREAL*! 



GOLD MEDAL 
WORLDS EXPOSITION, BRUSSELS, 1910 




VALVE DISCS 




"PRACTICALLY INDESTRUCTIBLE" 

For long and satisfactory service, 

nothing to equal them has 

ever been made. 



Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFC. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED 
Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 



GET THE GENUINE 

Stanley 
Steel Butts \ Hinges 

There are no others 
"just as good." 

Look for the 

TRADf 

Mar* 

Printed on the labels. 
Stamped on the butts. 

It is a guaranty of quality. 

THE STANLEY WORKS 



NEW BRITAIN 

A, MACFARLANE, MONTREAL 



CONN. - U.S.A. 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 



HARDWARE-METAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Montreal: 701-702 Ea.tern Townships Bank Bldg. Toronto : 143-149 University Are. Winnipeg: 34 Royal Bank Bldf 

New York: 115 Broadway. London, Enc: » Fleet St.. E.C. 



VOL. XXill. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE : TORONTO, JULY 15, 1911 



NO 28 




ARROW*BRAND 

REGISTERED TRADE MARK 



\. 



HARDWARE «,■ 

>y SPECIALITIES OFALL DESCRIPTIONS 



& 



c 



For 8al* by Leading Wholesale Houses. 



Uniform in weight 

"FLEUR DELIS" 

Galvanized Iron 

An Important Point to You and Your Customers 




John Lysaght, Limited A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 

Makers Montreal 

Brittol, Newport and Montreal Managers Canadian Branch 



f 



III 



CQH ■TTT* ^tt" ftt* cfcfc G G G G G 

Iff iff iff iff =g> iff -ff Iff iff -ff 



BIG MONEY in Selling The 

WESTERN TOOL GRINDER 



There is more money in selling it than in selling 
any other make of grinding machine. 

Because it is easy to handle. 
Because it is wireless, dirtless, and chainless. 
Because it is durable, efficient and economical. 
Because it reduces friction to a minimum. 
Because it is the lightest running and longest 

lived[machine sold. 
Because every .part of the machine is made of 
^1^,' the finest iron. 

Write usltO'day for fuller information. 



Taylor- Forbes Co., Ltd. 



3 



Guelph, 



Ontario 



REPRESENTED BY:— Taylor-Forbes Co , Ltd., 246 Craig St. W.. Montreal; H. G. Rogers— 53!4 
Dock Street. St. John.N.B : W. A. MacLennan— Vancouver. B.C.: J. B. H.Rickaby— Victoria. B.C : 
Harry F. Moulden— Travellers' Building, Winnipeg. Canadian United Mfrs. Agency, London. Enc 




G G d G G G G G G G 

-ff iff -ff -ff iff -ff -ff -ff Iff Iff 






HARDWARE AND METAL 



^ 



(Sjgrten 



A \yatp*ili( 



Sleepmeter 




Height 7 inches. Dial 4-Yi inches. 
Rings steadily for 5 minutes, intermittently for 10. 



HERE'S Big Ben — he's not quite a year old, 
but in less than a year, he's proven in the 
States the biggest clock success that we have 
ever known. — Today, ten months after his 
appearance, 12,000 jewelers — 60 per cent, of the total 
United States number — sell him at the rate of 2,000 a day, 
at the highest figure that's ever been quoted. 

We have now completed steps to introduce Big Ben to 
the Canadian trade on as extensive a scale as we did in 
the United States. Beginning with September we will ex- 
tend our campaign to all the leading Canadian publications 
and in order to enable Canadian dealers to get the max- 
imum benefit from our advertising, we are packing Big 



Ben specially for Canadian trade, 6 in a carton with a 
full set of Store Selling Helps (2 posters, 2 show cards, 2 
metal signs). 

On an order for 12 we add a solid mahogany display 
stand. On an order for 24 or more we print your name 
on dials, give you the posters, display stand and a beautiful 
metal sign lithographed in five colors. 

The retail Canadian price has been fixed at S3. 00. You 
can sell him for more if you want but you may not sell 
him for less. — Big Ben is already carried in stock by 34 
Canadian wholesalers. We shall be glad to let you have 
their names upon request. 



In broken and dozen lots, $2.20 less 5%. In case lots of 24, $2.10 less 5 %. 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co. 
La Salle, Illinois 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





Carborundum Sharpening Stones 

Never stay long on the shelves — they sell too fast — the demand is too great. Every dealer wants 

a stock that keeps moving. Carborundum Sharpening 
Stones are made to meet every sharpening need from the 
kitchen to the work bench - from the factory to the farm 
— they all give a tool a better edge in less time, last longer 
and do not glaze over. Made from Carborundum — and 
there isn't anything that is so hard, so sharpening or fast 
cutting. 

The complete Carborundum line, fncluding stones, r k ^ ^A 

hones, strops, scythe stones, knife sharpeners and 
Carborundum paper and cloth, etc., is described in the 
special catalog. Ask about our free display case offer, 
discounts, window displays and other trade helps. 

THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY 

NIAGARA FALLS, N.Y., U.S.A. 

Cable Address : Carborundum. Lieber's Code Preferred. 





Have You Seen These 

New "Yankee" Tools? 



No. 1530 Hand Drill for holes up to 3-16 in. 

Takes round sbank drills. Has the famous Automatic 
Double Ratchet movement the same as our other "Yankee" 
geared Drills, so helpful In many ways especially at close 
quarters where only part turn of crank can be obtained. 
The wood Handle has magazine for drill points. A fine 
tool for metal workers, amateur mechanics, etc. 

No. 130 Quick Return 

Same tool as the No. 30 but with a 
Spring inserted in the 'Handle to 
drive the spindle back quickly, 
ready for the next push. A great 
advantage for overhead work or 
where only one hand can be used. 
Takes all the Attachments used in 
the No. 30. 



No. 75 Push Brace 

Bores holes up to % inches in hard 
woods and % inches in white pine, 
quicker and easier than a Bit 
Brace. Drives and draws screws — 
takes all the small tools and works 
in close quarters where a Bit Brace 
cannot be used. Bearing down on 
the Handle drives it with that 
quick and easy motion of the 
"Yankee" Spiral Driver. 




They are catching the Mechanics. 
Better let your Jobber quote at once. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SIGNS OF QUALITY 

ON GOOD 

Washers, Wringers and Churns 

ARROW 



^^^ 



BRAND 



4 




YOU'LL SEE THEM AT THE BUSY STORES 

They're Trade Winners. No other line begins to equal 
them for Quality, Distinctiveness, Finish or Salability. 



THEY MEAN PROFIT TO DEALER AND SATISFACTION TO USER 



Eastern Agents, W. L. Haldimand & 
Son, Montreal, Que. 

Western Agents, H. F. Moulden & Son, 
■Winnipeg, Man. 



CUMMER - DOWSWELL, Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 




THE 




S.M.P. OILERS 



will soon be in demand 



HOW iS yOUr StOCk? Seamless Litho Oilers 

Special Design, Assorted 
Colors; Bent or Straight 
Spouts, Stencilled spec- 
ially. 

No. 675 

Inches, 3 x 3j 

THE SHEET METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY 

OF CANADA SUCCESSORS TO LIMITED 

Kemp Manufacturing Company 

Montreal TORONTO Winnipeg 



Stee! Oilers 

COPPERPLATED 

No. 875 

Inches, 3x3} 



Prices on Application 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



^A Cold Wave Coming 

This Red Hot Weather has got to go 

Not long now before the evenings will be chilly and 
later, shivery days will come with increasing frequency. 
It's then we want a heater to take the chill off the air and 
make the house comfortable. 

MILLER OIL HEATERS 

Smokeless and Odorless 

Are just the thing needed to keep the house comfortable 
on cool days and nights; to warm up the bath room and 
make the plunge a pleasure. 

No other like them to take the chill out of the air 

A Heating Wonder 

Absolutely Safe and Reliable 

Suitable for — 

Bed Room, Bath Room, 
Sitting Room, Camp or 
Cottage. 

Unsurpassed for 

Summer Hotels 

AUTOMATIC EXTINGUISHER 
REMOVABLE BRASS FOUNT 

'Produces Intense Heat without Smoke 
or Smell. 
Double Lock Seamed Sheet Steel 
Body, Perforated Top, Aluminum 
Window Frames and Name Plate, 
Mica Glass. 






No. 460 



No 451 — J*pan Trim; Holds 4 Quarts; Has No. 3 Circular Wick; 24$ inches High; Burns 10 Hours 

No. 452— Nickel Trim; ."4 " " No, 3 " " 24$ 

No. 460 — Small Size; Nickel Trim; Holds 4i pints; 19 inches High; Burns about 5 Hours. 

THERE IS A GOOD BUSINESS AND A NICE PROFIT IN THIS LINE. 



Write Us at Once for Particulars 

LEWIS BROS., Limited, Montreal 



OTTAWA 



Agents for Dominion of Canada 

TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Mistakes AreEasilyMade 

Especially in the Sporting Goods Line. 
You Can Avoid These Mistakes 

By Using 

OUR LATEST AND MOST UP-TO-DATE 

SportingGoodsCatalogue 

"Merchants"— "Buyers" 

This Catalogue will interest you 
and save your firm money. 



All goods illustrated have been chosen for their Sel- 
ling Qualities and are correctly described. 



We would appreciate your request if you will write 
for this Catalogue To-day. 

m FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, ft 

(F*TO WHOLESALE HARDWARE and IRON MERCHANTS Limited |>W) 

Montreal, ----- Canada 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MODEL 1910 

.351 calibre self-loading. 
20 in. round, blued finish, 
nickel steel barrel, sport- 
ing: front and rear sights; 
magazine holds 5 cart- 
ridges, and by placing one 
in the chamber before in- 
serting the magazine, 
gives 6 at the disposal of 
the user; the recoil from 
the exploded cartridge 
ejects the empty shell, 
cocks the hammer, and 
throws a fresh cartridge 
into the chamber; plain 
walnut stock and fore-end, 
full pistol grip, rubber 
butt plate, takes down at 
frame into two parts by 
removal of a screw, 
weight, each about 7% 
lbs Each 

$28.00 



MODEL 1907 

.401 calibre self-loading, 
20 in. round, blued, nickel 
steel barrel, sporting 

front and rear sights, De- 
tachable magazine, holds 
5 cartridges and by plac- 
ing one in the chamber 
before inserting the maga- 
zine, gives 6 at the dis- 
posal of the user, the re- 
coil from the exploded 
cartridge ejects the empty 
shell, cocks the hammer, 
and inserts a fresh cart- 
ridge into the chamber, a 
safety trigger lock shows 
a red band as warning 
when the lock is off. 
Blued receiver and guard 
made from nickel steel as 
well as all working parts, 
plain walnut stock and 
fore-end, full pistol grip, 
rubber butt plate, takes 
down at frame into two 
parts by removal of a 
screw, weight, each KY* 
lb List, Each 

$30.00 



WIN CHJE5 TEK 




RIFLES 

FOR ACCURACY AND QUALITY 



The New Self-loading Models excel all 
others for large game. 




They are always ready for instant use, for six shots or less. 
They are wonderfully simple in construction. 



iswdM&imm&ife 



MONTREAL AND WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



Steel Company of Canada 



Limited 



Bell Brand /T^\ Horseshoes 



TRADE f ■ V 1 MARK 




REGISTERED 



Accurate Crease, Exact Punching, Correct 

and Uniform Shape. 

Horse Nails Wire Nails 

Bar Iron Bar Steel 

Bolts and Nuts, Screws, Tacks, Bright Wire Goods, 
Wrought Pipe, Iron and Steel Wire, Field Fencing. 

District Sales Offices: 

Hamilton Toronto Montreal Winnipeg 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. B. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Send Along Your 
Letter Orders 




If you feel you would like to do more business 
in harvest tools it will pay to investigate The 
Samson line. 

We have developed a remarkable trade by 
giving unusual quality and value, and standing 
back of the goods with a positive guarantee. 

Order by mail and see how quickly we get 
goods to you. 



H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



TORONTO 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




BUTTS 



AND 



HINGES 



Scientifically made by expert workmen on rapid modern 
machinery are not too good for you. Keep a full stock 
of all sizes — Demand them from your jobber. 

CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 



HAMILTON 



MANUFACTURERS 



CANADA 



Davidson's Family Flour Cans-i 



Round — with overlapping Covers. Can be supplied 
Plain White, Japanned, or in Assorted Colors. 

Three Sizes, 25, 50 and 100 lbs. 




The "Empire" Flour Can 

TAKES UP LITTLE SPACE 
MADE TO HANG ON WALL OR DOOR 



Half Round Front, Flat Back, with hinge Cover 
White Japanned finish and lettered in gold 

I 

Capacity 50 pounds 

Dimensions 18 in. high, 15 in. wide 



F'g 4°5 



WRITEIFOR PRICES 




Fig 405 A 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg # Co v Limited 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DISSTON 




INSULATE SCREW DRIVER 

This tool is designed expressly for Electricians' use. The blade of crucible steel, 
hardened and tempered, is embedded in a handle of hard rubber of a texture that 
eliminates brittleness. It WILL NOT work loose. The rubber handle is milled 
grip, with projecting rings which prevent the hands from slipping down on to the 
blade. The hard rubber handle acts as insulation. 

The Disston Insulate Screw Driver is something new. Most 
practical Electricians' screw driver ever made. 

Henry Disston & Sons 

INCORPORATED 

Keystone Saw, Tool, Steel and File Works, - - PHILADELPHIA, P.A. 

Canadian Works— Fraser Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 





No. 700 Imperial Family Scale. 

Weighs up to 24 lbs. by ounces. Our 
Scale has recently been passed by the 
Canadian Authorities. 



No. 1 Kitchen Friend. 
Get busy and write us so we can quote price 
and let you know about our 

KITCHEN SET. 

Shows value three times its cost. 



AMERICAN CUTLERY CO. Chicago, U.S.A. 

Manufacturers of High Grade Cutlery, Scales and 
Household Specialties. 

Established 1865 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Implement Works 

For Sale By Tender 

Tenders will be received by the undersigned at their 
offices, 33 Scott Street, Toronto, up to twelve o'clock 
noon of Wednesday, July 19th, 1911, for the 
purchase as a going concern, of the Assets of 

The Wilkinson Plough Co. 



IMPLEMENT MANUFACTURERS 



Limited 



West Toronto Ontario, Canada 

CONSISTING OF 



LOT NO. 1.— REAL ESTATE, being 8% acres, more 
or less, on Brandon and Campbell 
Streets, West Toronto (Further par- 
ticulars may be obtained at the offices 

of the undersigned). Valued at $83,500.00 

Eleven buildings and erections there- 
on, including wood-working factory; 
shipping room ; storage and office 
building; blacksmith, machine and 
grinding shops; erecting shop; 
moulding shop; scraper factory. All 
valued at '. $69,350.00 



$152,850.00 
Subject to Mortgage thereon, with 
Interest computed to June 1st, 1911.. $52,167.00 



Equity $100,683.00 

LOT NO. 2.— PLANT 

Machinery as per Inventory $48,286.19 
Shafting & Hangers; Pulleys; 
Belting ; Tools ; Scales ; Dies, 

Etc., amounting to 22,206.57 

Patterns 7,613.45 

Patents 6,337.13 

Horses, Wagons, Etc 1,458.95 

Office Furniture, Etc 987.36 $86,889.65 



EOT NO. 3. — Toledo Steam Hammer Press and 



Equipment, Valued at 



13,000.00 



Forward $200,572.65- 



Forward 

EOT NO. 4.— MERCHANDISE, AS UNDER:— 

Walking Ploughs and parts $24,658.67 

Snow Ploughs 525.76 

Disc Ploughs 5,038.54 

Gangs 1,547.21 

Sulkies 1,105.53 

Sleighs 6,558.37 

Spreaders 4,893.91 

Wheel Scrapers 5,368.46 

Drag Scrapers 4,289.27 

Wheel Barrows 2,778.57 

Drag Harrows 1,568.81 

Disc Harrows 292.31 

Ensilage & Straw Cutters.. 8,661.16 

Dump Wagons 2,168.30 

Dump Carts 244.81 

Rollers 2,517.91 

Furnaces 621.36 

Stable Fittings 189.79 

Bolts, Screw, etc 3,578.86 

Rivets 179.89 

Iron & Steel Bars 6,345.74 

Sundries 4,905.84 

Coke, Sand, Etc 370.24 

Paints, Oils, Etc 969.03 

Pig & Scrap Iron 2,953.50 

Lumber 8,291.56 



$200,572.65 



LOT NO. 5. — Wagons and Parts, as per List 



$100,623.30 
7,191.00 



Total $308,386.95 



Tenders will be received for the five lots together, in which event Tenderers must state the amounts tendered for each lot 
separately. Tenders will also be received for each lot separately. 

The highest or any tender not necessarily accepted. 

Lot No. 1 is offered subject to conditions of sale which may be inspected at the offices of the undersigned. 

The Purchaser of Lot No. 1 must assume the mortgage and interest thereon. The Purchaser of the five lots will be given 
the benefit of all sales and manufacturing since April 22nd, 1911, and must pay all outlays for labor, expenses, and for supplies 
and materials purchased since such date.' 

TERMS OF SALE. — One quarter cash (10 per cent at time of sale) balance In 3, 6 and 9 months with interest at 7 per cent, 
per annum, secured to the satisfaction of the Assignee. 

A certified cheque for 10 per cent, of the amount of tender must accompany each tender, which cheque will be returned If 
tender is not accepted. 

Other conditions of sale may be seen upon application to the undersigned. 



E. R. C. CLARKSON <& SONS 

Assignees 
33 Scott Street, TORONTO 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



X C E L L , REGULAR— Gray Carton-for TELEPHONE 

and all other kind of OPEN 
CIRCUIT SERVICE. 



XCELL, IGNITORS 



Red Cartons- for SEVEREST 
IGNITION WORK- especially 
constructed for this service. < 



LOOK at the SPRING CONNECTORS, SOLDERE D to the 
Carbon and Zinc Electrodes, MAKING LOOSE CONNEC- 
TIONS IMPOSSIBLE. 

EXCLUSIVELY adopted by the BELL TELEPHONE CO., j 
four hundred other Telephone Companies, the LEADING " 

Electrical houses, the LARGEST Automobile and Motor- 
boat Supply Firms, the BEST 
Engine Builders and Dealers A 

and the BIGGEST Hard- 
ware Firms. 




Patent Applied for. 
Registered. 



OUR GOODS ARE SOLD 
ON THEIR MERITS. 

Every Cell we Sell 
is Guaranteed. 

MONEY BACK IF 
NOT SATISFIED. 



Electric 

FLASHLIGHTS 

and 

NOVELTIES 






Made by us of HIGHEST QUALITY. 
Write for Prices and Catalogue. 



MINIATURE LAMPS 
FOR FLASHLIGHT. 



All Styles. All Voltages. 



Carbon— Tungsten — Osram Lamps. NO TRUST. 

Our DRY CELLS give a Spark 
as Hot as the Fire of Vesuvius. 

Our FLASHLIGHT BATTERIES ARE GUARANTEED 
on the Shelf and in Service. 

Our MINIATURE TUNGSTEN LAMPS give a Light as Bright 

as the Sun. 





CANADIAN CARBON CO., Limited 



FACTORIES 



jTORONTO : 12-14-16 Shuter St. 



(WINNIPEG: Irish and Bury Ave. 
Order from your jobber. If not obtainable write nearest factory. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRANSPAROL 

Transparol is the finish that makes every surface a mirror, and is the leading 
finish for railroad cars, automobiles, and all other vehicles, also for leather. 

Transparol is a particularly choice finish, and one that is positively indifferent 
to all effects of 

Atmosphere 

Acids 

Oils 

Gasoline 

Salt Water, etc. 

Transparol is the best preservative of wood known, and is equally as good a 
preventative of rust and corrosion of metals. 

The gloss finish given a surface by an application of Transparol is so great that 
Transparol is the wonder of the paint and varnish experts. 

Transparol comprises the following universal qualities.: — 

Flexibility 
Elasticity and 
Durability 

History records that in Egypt they had a fluid which resisted the atmosphere for 
ages, and which modern civilization up to date has never been able to produce. 
THE OLD EGYPTIAN PRESERVATIVE HAS BEEN RE-DISCOVERED. 

Transparol stands alone among the multitude of paints, varnishes and shellac 
products like the pyramid amidst the ruins of Old Egypt.. 

Transparol is indestructible; and when all other products have worn away, 

Transparol will still be there. 

Transparol is sold on a guarantee to be satisfactory. 

For Exterior and Interior Use 

AMERICAN TRANSPAROL CO. 

50 Church Street, New York 

LIVE AGENTS WRITE FOR TERRITORY 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Economy, Cleanliness and Safety 



are the Three Essential Features of our 



Automatic Paint Brush 



40 per cent. LABOR SAVED 
20 per cent. PAINT SAVED 



It is adapted for use 
with all PAINTS and 
VARNISHES. 

It can be operated by 

gravity or 

AIR PRESSURE. 

It assures an equal 
flow at all TIMES. 




It absolutely elimin- 
ates dipping and 
dripping and thus 
makes for 

CLEANLINESS. 

It does away with 
the paint can and its 
resultant dangers. 



Bristles are set in metal. Remember the name — 

"METALSET" 

t 

For further particulars and descriptive pamphlet, address 

Standard Automatic Manufacturing Co. 

50 CHURCH STREET NEW YORK CITY 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




There is a Safe Profit in handling 

R&yb Lanterns 

There are Good Reasons why they command such a ready sale. 

1. — Most Light for the oil consumed. 

2. — Stay lit in any wind or rain. 

3. — Strong and durable— made to last. 

Rayo lanterns are known everywhere as standards of quality 
and usefulness. If customers cannot get them in your store, 
they will go elsewhere. 

Rayo lanterns are distinctively American goods. There is a 
Rayo lantern for every requirement ; all styles, sizes and finishes. 
Equipped with selected Rayo globes, clear red or green, as 
desired. Wicks inserted in burners ready for lighting. 

Are you getting your share of Rayo lantern business? 

Ask to-day for illustrated catalogue and price list 
at the nearest agency of 





Rayo No. 92. 

Tin finish, brass burner 
and cone, selected 
Rayo globe ; wick in- 
serted, ready to light. 



Rayo Driving Lamp: 

With dash clamp, or rigid bracket ; 
will not blow or jar out. 4-inch 
magnifying lens in front ; 3 - inch 
ruby lens in rear door. 



The Imperial Oil Co., Limited - The Queen City Oil Co., Limited 



Montreal, Quebec, St. John, 
Halifax, Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



Toronto 



Ottawa 



14 



HARDWAEE AND METAL 



ft 



SS CVFRFD £ 



MANUFACTORY : 

Surrey Works, Smethwick, near Birmingham, England 

SHOWROOMS : 

27-35 Drury Lane, London, W.C. 



Actual manufacturers of every description of 

Brass Fittings for 

Domestic Furnishing and Lighting 

Metallic Bedsteads, Cots, Wire 

Mattresses. 

Brass and Copper and Brass Cased 

Tubes. 

Rolled Brass and Copper. 

Switch Gear. 

CANADIAN AGENT: 

Geo. H. Say well - Saskatoon 

Cables and Telegrams : Rosswell, Saskatoon. Telephone, 4317 Saskatoon. 

STOCK ROOMS AT: 
Windsor Hotel, Ottawa, July 17th. 
Queen's Hotel, Toronto, July 21st. 



15 



II A K I) WAKE AND METAL 




The Buyer for the Home 



She believes in the merchant who does business on the 
Quality basis — in goods whose trade mark is backed and pushed 
by energetic advertising. 

The " Wear Ever " trade mark means quality in cooking 
utensils. 

Its prestige means to you not only pleased and profitable 
buyers of cooking utensils, but more trade on your other lines. 

It helps to make your name synonymous with quality. 

You should have " Wear Ever " advertising — magazine 
and dealer aid — working for You. 

Write 



The Northern Aluminum Co., Ltd. 



Dopt. H 



Toronto, Ontario 



16 



HAKDWAKE AND METAL 



SPOONS 

FORKS AND 

OTHER PIECES 

STAMPED 



1847 ROGERS BROS.® 



X s 

TRIPLE 



ARE THE 

ORIGINAL 

AND GENUINE 

'ROGERS" GOODS 








"AMERICAN BEAUTY ROSE" 
A pattern that possesses the charm and dainty beauty of the flower whose name it bears, together with the excellence of quality in all 
Knives, Forks and Spoons bearing the trade mark. 



1847 ROGERS BROS. 



X s 
TRIPLE 



The design and decorative treatment of the "American Beauty Rose" 
pattern has been executed with masterly skill and perfection. The floral 
decoration is finished in soft French Grey. This in combination with the 
brilliant burnished surface lends to the pattern an attractiveness which will be 
enhanced by time and use. 

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., HAMILTON, CANADA 



J 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SPOONS 

FORKS AND 

OTHER PIECES 

STAMPED 



1847 ROGERS BROS.® 



x s 

TRIPLE 



ARE THE 

ORIGINAL 

AND GENUINE 

'ROGERS" GOODS 




"AMERICAN BEAUTY ROSE" 

A pattern that possesses the charm and dainty beauty of the flower whose name it bears, together with the excellence of quality in all 

Knives, Forks and Spoons bearing the trade mark. The design and decorative treatment of the "American Beauty Rose" pattern 

y _ has been executed with masterly skill and perfection. The floral decoration is finished 

* i in soft French Grey. This in combination with the brilliant burnished surface lends 

TRIPLF to the pattern an attractiveness which will be enhanced by time and use. 

MERIDEN B RITANNIA CO., HAMILTON, CANADA 

18 ~~ 



1847 ROGERS BROS 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SUMMER SPECIALTIES 

Asbestos -Lined Covers 
for Mrs. Potts 9 Irons 

This cover is made from two separate steel covers with heavy 
asbestos between : made to cover a set of three irons. It is used 
on Gas, Gasolene, Oil or Wood Stoves or Ranges, and will 
save the price of itself in fuel in a very short time. 




Measuring Cups 

Marked for Measuring One- 
quarter and One-third 
Cups. 



Funnels 



(Strainer and Funnel Combined) 





GREATLY FACILITATE THE WORK IN THE KITCHEN 



A QUICK FIRE AND A GOOD OVEN 



That is what 




ft 



LeRoy " 



Style 9C 



means 

And that's what campers and 
summer cottagers require. 
The "LeRoy" is just the 
range for the summer season. 
It has a good oven, therefore 
campers need not do without 
any of the pastry delicacies 
of home. It fires up quickly, 
and cools equally fast when the 
fire is quenched. Can be 
supplied with legs. 



SUGGEST THIS RANGE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 

McCLARY'S 



LONDON 
TORONTO 
MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 
ST. JOHN 



HAMILTON 
CALGARY 
SASKATOON 



19 



II A 1! I) \V A 1! E AND METAL 



The Saskatchewan Glass and Supply Company, Ltd 



WHOLESALE IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Glass and Builders 9 Supplies 



WE CARRY A FULL STOCK OF THE FOLLOWING: 



Polished Plate Glass 
Window and Leaded Glasa 
Fancy and Wired Glass 
Mirrors and Bevelled Plates 
Plasters, Limes and Cements 

No order too large or too small. 



Building and Sheathing Papers Metallic Ceilings and Cornices 

Pell .uid Asbestos Papers Metallic Shingles and Sidings 

Rubber Roofings and Roofing Papers Sewer Pipe and Tilings 

Nails and Sash Pins Plasterers' Hair, Sash Bars, Brick 

Putty and Glaziers' Points Mantels, Grates and Tile. 



Prompt shipments our specialty. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



P.O. BOX 67 



Cor. Manitoba and Sixth Avenue 

MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN 



TELEPHONE 348 



1 



9 



1 

ft 



r 



Convex Reversible Wafer. " Upright.' 



REGISTERS 

All Known Sizes, Shapes and Finishes 

The Genuine Convex Reversible 
Wafer works either way, by 
simply changing two screws. 

All Varieties of Registers, 
Faces and Borders supplied 
in any quantity or finish. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co. B t!lri u . rB 






«- 



Convex Reversible Wafer, "Across." 




Attractive, Convenient, Durable, Reasonable in Price. 



Our Patented Metal Shelf Boxes will Improve the appearance of 
your store, and will enable you to give your customers quicker 
and more efficient service. 

Advise us space you have available for shelf boxes and shelving 



and we will sketch out plan and give you our best price for 

same. 

Send for illustrated catalogue, it wiU interest you. 

Cameron and Campbell, - Toronto 




Peerless Freezer 

Sold Everywhere 

Universally Successful 



Easy to grind as a watch to wind 

PEERLESS 

FREEZER 



Favorite with Women. Freezing in Three 
Minutes. Advertising Claims Proven in, 
the Use* 




The Dana Mfg. Co., Cincinnati, -O. 



Dana 
Food Chopper 



Dana Mop Wringer 
takes a woman 
off her knees 



HAEDWARE AND METAL 



THE "CANADIAN HOWARD" 

Double Radiator Furnace 

is absolutely reliable because only the 
best workmanship and the best materials 
have been used in its manufacture. It 
is so constructed that the heat first passes 
through the dome, into and around the 
upper radiator and thence into and around 

the lower rad- 
iator before 
reaching the 
smoke exit, 
thereby mak- 
ing a long and 
uninterrup- 
ted circuit 
and so afford- 
ing an enor- 
mous radiat- 
ing surface. 

If you are interested, write us for full particulars. 

The G. Norsworthy Co., Limited, 

ST. THOMAS, - ONTARIO. 




Copp's Stoves 
and Ranges 

SILVER QUEEN 




Our new medium 
priced up-to-date 
Range. 

It will pay you to 
investigate its 
merits. 



"The Western Stove Makers* 1 



&1&M) 



Fort William, Winnipeg. Vancouver. 



Canadian Heating & Ventilating Co. 

Headquarters for Limited 

Side Wall and Floor Registers and Faces 





MOORISH DESIGN CAST REGISTER 
Mad* in full sizes from 7 x 1 to 12x15 



EMPIRE SPECIAL 
New design, made in 8x10 and 9x12 sizes 



Our "EMPIRE SPECIAL" 

is an especially neat and attractive new design, and meets the demand for a register with a larger opening. 
Is a sure winner, and sells at a moderate price. Ask us for particulars. Manufactured by us at 



Owen Sound 



Ontario 



CHRISTIE BROS. CO. 
Cor. Park and Henry Sts , Winnipeg 



Western Agents : 



M C. DREW & SON 
Vancouver, B.C. 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hamilton Jewel Gas Ranges 

for MANUFACTURED or NATURAL GAS are made in over 125 VARIETIES 
and Every Requirement can be Supplied. 




No. 
15 

20 
30 
40 
50 
60 
65 



No. 

70 
80 
90 
95 



Single Oven 

Size of Oven Size of Top 



17x12x12 in. 
17x12x12 in. 
16xl6xll| in. 
15Jxl6Jxll in. 
16^x164x11 in. 
18x164x11 in. 
19x184x12 in. 



22x19 in. 
32x19 in. 
35Jx22J in. 
3»ix22i in. 
30|x22i in. 
38Jx22} in. 
39x24} in. 



Double Oven 



Size of Oven 
15}xl6£xll 
16Jxl6£xll 
18x164x11 
19x18^x12 



Size of Top 
15} x 16x84 
164x16x84 
18x16x84 
19xl8Jx8 



The Ovens have Spring 
Balanced Drop Doors. The 
Valves, Airmixers and other 
trimmings are all nickel plated. 
Galvanized Dust Tray under Top 
Burners. The body of Range is 
Asbestos Lined. All these 
Ranges are equipped with 
Grave's Patent Safety Lighters 
— see cut above. This lighter is 
far superior to the old style 
Pilot Light. It is absolutely safe 
because the oven door must be 
opened before the Oven Burners 
can be lighted, and thus all 
possibility of explosion through 
accidental accumulation of gas in 
the oven is avoided. 



A Thermometer for regis- 
tering the heat of Oven can be 
attached to the Oven door of 
any Hamilton Jewel Gas Range. 

These Ranges can be fitted 
with Hot Water Heating attach- 
ments, or with Reservoirs or 
Side Broilers, and Top can be 
extended if desired; 



Large Hotel 
Ranges 

are supplied in every style. 





Elevated Oven 

Ranges are made in many 
different styles which are fully 
described in our Catalogue 
No. 69. 



We also make various 



styles of 

Side Oven 

Ranges, which we have not 
room to illustrate here. 



If you have not got our 
catalogue, write us for one. 

All Ranges are thoroughly 
tested before leaving factory. 



Each Range is fitted with 

Jewel Adjustable 
Needle Valve 

which gives perfect control of 
gas supply. For accurate 
mechanical construction and 
satisfactory working, no other 
valve equals it. 

Get our Catalogue 
No. 69 



MANUFACTURED BY 



|L 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

Head Office and Factory at HAMILTON Winnipeg Branch, 130 James Ave. 

Agencies at Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver. 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

" Comet" Brand 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makert 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sol* Canadian Sales gent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

13 St. John Street - Montreal 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Uied In factor-let of all klndi for 
hurried machine repair*. 

All machine shops and railway 
■hops ihonld have It. 

Bridge builders, track layers, 
and structural metal workers 
hare constant use for It. 

Sand for Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER . - ONTARIO 



Queen City Water White 

GIVES PERFECT LIGHT 

FOR SALE BY DEALERS EVERYWHERE 




is a line that never varies in quality. 
The consignments you receive from 
time to time are the same through 
and through — absolutely reliable in 
toughness, strength and workability. 
Economical and correct methods of 
production mean that you get a flaw- 
less product at the lowest prices. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, CANADA 

Sales Agents, Ontario: Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba: Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 



Mention this paper when writing 
Advertisers. 

23 



Three 
One 



We have just 
issued under one 
cover new booklet 
containing 

First 

illustrations. 

Second 

descriptive matter. 

Third 

list prices of our 
complete line of 

Furnaces and 
Furnace Materials 

and 

Boilers and 
Boiler Materials 

Copies have 
already been 
mailed to our 
numerous customers 
in Ontario. 
Possibly some 
have been overlooked. 
Have you received 
a copy? 

If not, communicate 
with us to-day 

Pease Foundry Company 



-LIMITED- 



Toronto, 



Canada 



Pease-Waldon Company 



Winnipeg, 



•LIMITED- 



Canada 



We manufacture and stock 
all materials required in con- 
nection with Warm Air, Hot 
Water and Steam Heating 
Installations. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ONLY THE BEST 



is good enough when it comes to Axe 
Handles — that is, if you want to sell 
them. The best means 

STILL'S 

AXE HANDLES 

which are well shaped, well balanced 
and uniformly finished. All our tim- 
ber is carefully selected, and we can 
therefore guarantee every handle we 
sell. 

Write us for prices 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

ST. THOMAS ONTARIO 



Not an Enterprise 
for the "Quitter" 

"If there is one enterprise on earth," says John 
Wanamaker, "that a 'quitter' should leave 
severely alone, it is advertising. To make 
a success of advertising one musT: be prepared 
to slick like a barnacle on a boat's bottom. 

" He must know before he begins it that 
he must spend money — lots of it. 

" Somebody must tell him that he cannot 
hope to reap results commensurate with his 
expenditure early in the game. 

" Advertising does not jerk ; it pulls. It 
begins very gently at first, but the pull is steady. 
It increases day by day and year by year, 
until it exerts an irresistible power." 



GREENING'S 

COW TIES 




24 



MADE IN SIX DIFFERENT 
STYLES, VIZ: 

Open Ring, Closed Ring, Small 
Closed Ring, Three Chain, Four 
Chain, Greening's Special 

These are standard goods made of 
Greening's Steel Chain, without a weak 
spot, and all fittings of proportionate 
strength. They are incomparable in 
lightness, strength and appearance. 

WRITE US FOR TRADE PRICES 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd 



HAMILTON 



MONTREAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Get the Local agency for "Safelock" Wire Fence 

You will find "Safelock" the best selling line of fence you ever handled, because 
you can prove by actual demonstration that it really is the strongest fence made. 

Look at this little cut — note how the stay wires interlock where they wrap the strand 
wire. You simply cannot make a "Safelock" stay slip in any direction. And, as the 
strand wires are not kinked , at the lock, every wire retains its full strength. 

Better write us to-day about getting an exclusive "Safelock' agonoy for your locality 

The Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Ltd., Owen Sound, Ont. 

Western Agents : The Brandon Safelock Fence Co., Brandon, Man. 




|i 




"GOOD CHEER" Sidewall Registers 

A line in four sizes, of uniform design throughout. Neat and tasteful pattern, and 
supplied in black japan, ordinary oxidized or full oxidized finish, with enamelled green 
fan. Our ordinary oxidized will about equal the more expensive full oxidized finish 
of other makes. 

Positive acting: fan — stays exactly where set, and when closed locks tight. No 
springs, etc., to weaken or loosen. 

The price? It will pay you to inquire. 

A full line of the above carried by The Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Man. 

The Jas. Stewart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 

Woodstock, Ontario 




SOCLEAN 

THE. PEERLESS 

SWEEPING COMPOUND 

Since its introduction into clubs, banks, schools, 
hospitals, and many other public places where 
cleanliness is required, its use has been constant 
and steadily on the increase. 

SOCLEAN is so prepared as to make it non-com- 
bustible. Its moisture and disinfectant properties 
are held till the last ounce. It can safely be used 
on the finest rugs and carpets — contains no grease. 

If you have not stocked SOCLEAN — send us your 
order at once. We furnish attractive window and 
counter advertising. 

You cannot buy any other sweeping compound "just as good " as SOCLEAN. It is fully protected by patents 

all over Canada. 

Start a cleaning campaign in your district by pushing SOCLEAN, the profit will repay your efforts. 

ADDRESS DEPT. "H." 



SOCLEAN LIMITED 



444 King St. West 



TORONTO 



Phone Adelaide 1584 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




THERE'S a smoothness of corners and minute excellence of the threads 
which bring orders "just like the last" and add new boosters for the 
Acme products every day. 

We carry all kinds of Cap and Set Screws at factories and warehouses ; 
also A.LA.M. Plain and Castellated Nuts. Prices are right and deliveries 
immediate. 

Especial facilities for work in Brass, Steel and Iron to samples or drawings. 

ASK FOR "MILLED PRODUCTS." 

The National-Acme Manufacturing Company 

MONTREAL, St. Elizabeth St. and G.T.R. NEW YORK, 77 White Street. 
BOSTON, 141 Milk Street. CHICAGO, 549 Washington Blvd. DETROIT, 
1222 Majestic Bldg. ATLANTA, Candler Bldg. 

WAREHOUSES-New York. 77 'White St.: Chicago. 549 Washington Blvd. 
PLANTS— Cleveland. Ohio Montreal, Canada. 




NAMCOJ 



THE YANKEE 

(Made in England) 


- J ' W$M 

Safety Razor ^p '£■• "- '■" T - - £M 

that you can j ^r .'W 


$18.00 

Per Dozen 
Delivered. 

It's the most 
compact pocket 
edition of a 
case that you 
ever laid eyes 
on. 


The entire effect and intrinsic value easily proves a Superior $5.00 standard. 

INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, Montreal, Canada 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHAT FILES 



are you handling? Are they 
perfectly satisfactory to your 
customers? If you would be 
absolutely certain about the 
quality of your file stock, make 
it a point to handle only 
Nicholson-made Files. These 
are the favorite made-in- Canada 
Nicholson Brands: — 



"American" 

"Arcade" 

"Great Western" 

"Globe" 

"Eagle" 

"McLellan" 

Kearney & Foot 

"J. B. Smith" 

Nicholson-Made Files 
are the standard of file 
quality the world over. 
Since 1864 we have 
specialized in the man- 
ufacture of high-grade 
files. 

Our long experience, 
special machinery, 
special methods, speci- 
ally trained men and specially 
made steel stand back of every 
dealer who sells Nicholson- 
Made Files. 

Your Jobber sells them 

NICHOLSON 
FILE CO. 

(Dominion Worksl 

PORT HOPE, - - ONT. 



FELL wall paper because 
it will bring more busi- 
ness and more profit 

Sell STAUNTON wall 

paper, became it brings the 
utmost business and profit 
possible. 




WA1X<£ 




is looked upon as the leading wall 
paper of the country by the most 
experienced merchants. Every 
year shows a big increase in the 
demand. Thus far this season our 
sales are very much ahead of last, 
and last year was the best up to 
that time. 

If you will take the opportunity 
which we will gladly give and 
examine the 1912 STAUNTON' wall 
papers, you will quickly see why it 
is " the best selling line in the 
country." 

Write us to arrange for you to see 
them . Write to-day. Wall paper 
is a logical hardware line Why 
sell all manner of supplies for the 
house and let your customers pay 
their wallpaper money to the man 
across the street ? 



STAUNTONS Limited 

WALL PAPER 
Manufacturers 



943 YONGE ST. 



TORONTO 



27 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Our " BARR " Gash Carriers Lead 

They lead in construction. They are simply and strongly 
made, and in case of disarrangement can be easily put right 
without the help of a mechanic. 

They lead in convenience. For the rapidity and ease in 
which they can be handled, they stand without a rival. 

They lead in popularity. Their excellent quality and service 
have found first place for them in many of the leading stores 
throughout the Dominion. 

Send for catalogue and prices 

The Hamilton Brass Mfg. Company, Ltd. 

Hamilton, Ontario, and Montreal, P.Q. 



Keep in mind the domin- 
ant fact that mankind from 
its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by 
nature to look for signs ; 
for invitations to taste; for 
suggestions as to what to 
wear. Tell your story 
briefly, forcibly, truthful- 
ly, and address it through 
the proper media and you 
can successfully apply ad- 
vertising as a means to 
increased distribution. 



Aroyou /n*ere»«d In any of t/ie 
//<**>• that are advei-tloed T 

A Post Oard will bring ymu prtmo 
ll mt and full Information 

Don'* forgot *• m«itfM this 
papor 



When writing advertisers kindly men- 
tion having seen the advertisement in 
this paper. 



IRON 
STABLE FITTINGS 




Send for Illustrated Catalogue and 
discounts to hardware dealers. 

Dennis Wire and Iron Works Co., 

Limited 
London, Ontario 



O.K. THIMBLES 




Every new house In your town means a proa- 
peat for several O.K. Store Pip* Tbimblei. 
Ton should o*R7 a good supply in stock and 
be ready to supply them when wanted. 

O.K. Thimble* ar» mad* for both floor* and 
partitions. They can always be pnt in place 
Instantly. Tour customers will prefer than to 
aay other Stove Pip* Thimble* they eaa buy. 



METAL SHINGLE &SIDING C° LTD. 

PRESTON £ MONTREAL 



For tale by Jobbers or by the Manufacturers 




GROW, DEALERS! SPREAD OUT! 

Put yourself in a position to take any kind of a roofing 
contract. With 



* A AiVA .A 



"CROWN" 



PATENT 
STEEL 



SHINGLES 



you have a better proposition than the slater can possibly 
offer. Get some (or all) of that business you've had to 
lose to him for so long. Get started to-day — right now, 
by writing for our catalogue and price lists. At the same time we'll send you our samples, 

charges prepaid. Write at once to 

McFARLANE <&. DOUGLAS, Limited, 250260 siater street, Ottawa, Ont. 

28 " 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALLIC CEILINGS 




tt 



Boost Them, Mr. Hardware Man, Boost Them 



n 



Anything in metal is in the 
Hardware line. Few lines carry 
as good a profit as our Metallic 
Ceilings. 

. Don't let Plasterers and 
Paperhangers get all the 
profitable interior finish 
business'" 

Boost "Metallic." 



Metallic Ceilings 
carry three separate 
profits— on the sale of 
the goods, on the erection, 
and on the paint to re-coat 
them. 

Get in touch with us to-day 




Our Metallic Ceilings are in a class 
all by themselves. 

Bold, Clear Embossing. 
Snug, Tight Joints. 
Sheets Dead Square. 
Good Heavy Stock. 

Get OUR Samples in 

your window and our 

Printed Matter on your 

counter. They are 

bound to pull enquiries 

for you. 

Catalogue and Samples on Request. 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

(19) 




In this Age of 
Competition 

the dealers find it ne- 
cessary to keep posted, 
to handle standard pro- 
ducts which have 
merit — the result of 
experience. 

q Such are RICHARDS-WILCOX products 
in door hangers, mounted grindstones and 
hardware specialties. 

Q Remember, we have a hanger for any 

door that slides and a hundred real live 

specialties your trade wants. Are you 
interested ? 



Ask us to show you 
grindstone profits. 



better hanger and 



CATALOGS 

RICHARDS-WILCOX MFG. CO. 






AURORA, ILLINOIS 
U.S.A. 




Get our 
Catalog "B 
and 
Prices 




RIGHT IN THE HARDWARE LINE! 

A splendid-selling line for Spring and Summer, which every 
family will buy on sight is the 

STRATFORD SWING 

It is made of thoroughly-seasoned wood, and is perfectly safe 
because it is so well designed, well made and sufficiently bolted. 

Seats are adjustable, and foot rest can be placed on level with 
seats, forming a couch. Can be brought down to a convenient 
height for children. 

Shipped either knocked down or set up and folded. 

We also make "Boyers" Famous Gliding Settee, and all kinds 
of ladders, gaiden and park seats. 



THE STRATFORD MFG. CO., Limited 

STRATFORD. ONTARIO 



29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ASK US WHY 

If you want to know more about "STANDARD" 

_ DOUBLE ACTING 
HI I SPRING FLOOR 





otruHAwx fiam tuu 



HINGES, let us tell you a few dealers, the LARGEST 
and BEST, who believe in keeping UP-TO-DATE and 
are pushing the "STANDARD" line. 

THE STANDARD MFG. CO., Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A. 




No. 



No. 



OOPYRIGHTED, 



HE STANLEY RUIE A LEVEL CO. 



We have recently added to the many Scrapers that we manufacture 
TWO NEW DESIGNS 

8 1— For Fine Cabinet Work. This tool is nickel-plated, adjustable, 
and has a detachable rosewood face. Blade is i\ inches in width. 
This is a splendid tool for very fine work. List price, $ 1 .50 each. 
82 — Specially designed for scraping hardwood floors. It is adjust- 
able and the blade can be tilted to practically any angle for 
working in corners and inaccessible places. Width of blade, 
three inches. List price ..... $1.05 each. 
Look for the name STANLEY on every tool. It is a guarantee of the 
highest class of workmanship and material. 
Send for Catalogue 

"New Britaik.Conn.USlA. 



BETTER SEND ALONG THAT ENQUIRY TO-DAY! 



We make a very special quality of 



Annealed Wire and Oiled and Annealed Wire 

which is commanding a ready sale wherever introduced. Specially soft wire, very pliable, is used in its manufacture, and 
these wires are non-rustable. Oil will not come off on the hands. Get our prices on 

WIRE NAILS AND STAPLES, AND WIRE BALE-TIES 

We have the right goods for successful trading. 

The Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, Ont. 

Geo. W. Laidlaw, Vancouver, B.C. Harry F. Moulden, Winnipeg, Man. 



I 





THE PRACTICAL 

MAN USES 



FLUXITE 



The Paste Flux That 



s I rs/i 



RING 



AND SUPERSEDES LEAD BURNING 



The satisfied smile, 

Happy and bright, 
He's making a pile 

By using FLUXITE. 



It solders even dirty metals without cleaning and without corrosion. It Joints lead 
without solder, merely by the use of a blow-lamp or blow-pipe. Anyone can do soldering 
work with Fluxite. It Is a necessity In the tool kit of every motor car, workshop and 
home. Easy to use. easy to sell. 

REMEMBER IT IN YOUR INDENTS. 

Packed in small and large tins. Made by 

THE AUTO CONTROLLER CO., 212 So^ li.7NG d,ey 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Horse-Shoe Brand Wringers 



All Styles and Sizes for 
Hand or Power Operation. 




Special Sizes for Laundry Use. 




UNIVERSAL WRINGER 



Warranted 3 years for family use. 

Has enclosed cog wheels which prevent 
accidents to fingers. 



Plain Bearings 

No. 350E 
No. 351E 



Ball Bearings 

No. 380E 
No. 381E 



Size of Rolls 

10 x lM in. 

11 x 1# in. 



Hardware Merchants are invited to 
send for Catalog No. 9. 




The American Wringer Co., New York 




JAMES GARTLAND & SON 

BIRMINGHAM, England " MITED 

Alio LONDON, CLASCOW, CAPE TOWN and SYDNEY, NSW. 
Contractors to tho Admiralty ana War Office 

the"CONYERTIBLE "patent FANLIGHT OPENER 



Simple 
Effective 
Compact 




1796 IRON 

% screw 4/- 

% " 6/6 

1796 BRASS 

H screw 6/6 

K " 8/6 

1797 CUN METAL 

y% screw 6/6 

% " 10/6 

each. 



Manufacturers of every description of 

BUILDERS' CABINET, FANCY AND 
NAVAL BRASS FO UNDRY 

Original Patentees and Manufacturers of 

Cart I and Patent Helical, Climax, Adjustable, 
and Reliable Door Springs 

FANLIGHT OPENERS AND GEARINGS OF EVERY KINO 



Architects' Own Designs and 8peolal Requirements Carefully Exeouted 

Our new Catalogue, 1911 edition, fully illustrated, mailed free on 
application to wholesale Hardware Merchants. 




The Corbin Pin Tumbler Cylinder 

gives practically an unlimited number 
of changes of key. The key-way will 
not admit picking tools. The ball bearings so nearly elim- 
inate wear and friction that a million insertions of the key 
do not affect the working of the lock. The master ring 
gives two independent locks in a single cylinder, using the 
same key-way. 

Send for publications JK16, JK17, JK33, JK53 and JK80, 
describing Corbin products. 

P. & F. Corbin, New Britain, Conn. P. & F. Corbin, New 
York. P. & F. Corbin, Chicago. P.& F. Corbin, Philadelphi 



31 



HARDWARE AND ME TAJ. 



NUMBER 

108 




AUTOMATIC DRILL 

Every dealer who takes pride in the quality of the goods which he offers 
should have this fine drill in stock. 

Its design and construction are the results of more than 20 years devoted 
to the manufacture and sale of such goods. 

We KNOW it is RIGHT and YOUR customers will appreciate it. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 



tz/w/Mni/A^ 



GREENFIELD, 



MASS., U.S.A. 




* CERTAINTY IS WHAT A MAN SEEKS IN EVERYTHING 



The man who buys a 



Model 10 Visible 

Remington 



Typewriter 




buys absolute certainty; a certainty of satisfaction guaranteed by the 
greatest typewriter makers in the world 

Remington Typewriter Company, Limited 



18 Victoria Square 



Montreal, Can. 



32 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





Canadian Leaders in Dry Cells 

COLUMBIA 

There can be only one leader in any given line. That leadership must 
be obtained and recognized on account of superior qualities proven in 
service. 

On this basis Columbia has won the distinction of having the longest 
life, being the lowest in cost in the end, and giving the maximum of 
good service. 

It is made of tested material, and only skilled men and highly special- 
ized machinery put the ingredients together. 

To make Columbia of greatest service to our customers we have made 
it from two formulas that produce somewhat different results. 
COLUMBIA is a light drain cell for all forms of intermittent work — 
bells, telephones, signals, self winding clocks, electrical toys, wireless 

telegraph outfits, and numerous other things 

Its chief qualities are long shelf life, uniformity of service, and low cost when compared with the length of 

its life. 

COLUMBIA IGNITOR is somewhat different. It is a strong current, quick recuperating cell for all forms 

of motor ignition — automobiles, motor boats, gas and gasoline engines, motor cycles, aeroplanes. 

When once used these will be always used. For sale by all electrical dealers. 

Address H.M.— 11 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Ltd. - Toronto, Ont. 

NOTE — Our New Factory at Toronto is thoroughly prepared to make quick shipments 
of fresh cells in any quantity. 




r, 0Nsi CARBON CO.l* 5 * 
"Toronto. Ont 



ACORN EXHAUST 




Mr. Dealer -Get Out After 
The Ventilator Trade ! 

Look around and see just where Ventilators 
could be used advantageously in your town. 
Get the agency for Acorn Exhaust Ventilat- 
ors, and you'll be surprised at the results. 
With fresh, pure air in the factory, employees 
will be able to do better work and more of 
it. The Acorn Exhaust Ventilator will take 
care of that. Then, too, pure air is more 
easily heated than foul air. 
Highly recommended by builders and con- 
tractors. Acorn Exhaust Ventilators are new- 
est and best. For factories, churches, etc., 
they are unequalled. 

Give this suggestion a trial, and if you de- 
cide to do so,, just write us, and we will 
furnish you with full details. 




j*»5sasi 



: : 



U TD. 
* ONT. 



GARDEN FENCING 




in if n uMiffrmgan . . 

r.w.I.I.,.,.,.,.f.,.#.*,f.M.t.t.t.l.l.t.t>1.t.l.f.f.t.til.t.ht.tl 

llllllllllllltllllllllllllllllll llllllllllllllllltllllllillllllli 

>i nun in in 1 1 minimi mil limit Himiiiiiiiiiiilmiiiii IIIIIIllTllllltlllr iiuiill 

iiiiiiii 
iiiiiiii 
iiiiiiii 
liiiiiiii 



iiijiiiiiiiiiijiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii |iiiiiiiih iiiiiii 

iiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiimiii imiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiii imiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimii.ini iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 

I i IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII I HUMMtMMtfc IHIIMM— J— i — — — t 



C. H. Johnson & Sons, Limited 

WIRE WORKS 

Dagenais St, St Henry, Montreal 



FACTORY ALSO AT MONTREAL. QUE. 



33 



♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



LION 



Cordage 




Quality 



1 



BRAND 



When you place an order with the Consumers Cordage Company you may rest assured that you 
will get your money's worth. 

Lion Brand stands for rope that will last ; rope that will do all that is expected of it and more; 
rope that will give such satisfaction that you will sell more of it than any other kind. 
We do not make cheap rope. Our prices are low, but the quality of our cordage is high. It 
pays us to do business this way, as we want your repeat orders. 

If you have ever handled Consumers cordage you know that it consists of the best possible 
materials; but if not, please specify Consumers' make when ordering, that youmay give your custo- 
mer the best that the market can furnish. 

Consumers Cordage Co., 



Established 1825 



LIMITED 



Manufacturers of Manila, Sisal, Italian, Russian. Jute, Cordage in any form. 

Careful Execution SPECIAL ORDERS Prompt Shipment . 
Mills: MONTREAL, QUE., and HALIFAX, N.S. 

WELL ASSORTED STOCKS CARRIED AT BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

F. H. Andrews & Son Consumers Cordage Co- , Limited Tees & Persse, Limited MacGowan & Co. 

Quebec, Que. 22 Church St., Toronto, Ont. Winnipeg, Regina, Vanocuver, B.C. 

and St. John, N.B. Calgary, Edmonton 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦» 




INVALID CHAIR 




The divided 
leg- re?t 
chair shown 
in the cut 
h as wheels 
and metal 
work of steel 
and malle- 
able iron, 
has a frame 
of best hard- 
wood, while seat, back and front, are of cane web- 
bing. The comfort and ease that it brings to the 
invalid and the splendid wear, resulting from the 
use of sturdy materials, make it a readily sold chair. 



The Gendron Mfg. Co., Limited 



DUCHESS STREET, 



TORONTO, ONT. 



How about your kitchen-ware 
department? We have a line 
that will prove to be the most 
popular and most profitable for 
you to handle. Hardwaremen 
who handle them testify this to 
be a fact. 

Our Guarantee protects you in every 
respect. Do not hesitate— write at once. 




Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 

Watford, Ont. Rockford, III. 



34 



HARDWARE APMETAL 



mportant 
Announce- 
ment byjthe 

I ONEIDA 
COMMUNITY 





OMMCJMTy SILVER 
RELIANCE PLATE 










35 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





T HAS ALWAYS BEEN the special 

ambition of the Oneida Community to 
make the very best in any line of man- 
ufacture they were engaged in. That was 
% m the basic idea of Community Silver ten 

years ago; that is the real secret of its present success. 

But, just as the modern battleship is constantly 
improving its armor plate, no matter how perfect it may 
have seemed, Community Silver — the most modern plated 
ware — is constantly seeking to better the armoring of its 
own silver plate. The latest wear-resisting improvement in 

commun rry 

SILVER. 

is so striking that it can be easily detected by any Dealer* 
It consists of a circular disc of pure silver overlaid at the 
wearing points of every Community Silver spoon. This 
special wearing-point protection is an addition to Com- 
munity Silver's superbly heavy general plate, and makes 
Community Silver practically wear impregnable. 




COMMONTTy SILVER 
RELIANCE PLATE 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




The same quality improvement has also been applied 
to Reliance Plate, so that this now has practically as great 
wearing value as any other line of Plated Ware in the 
market, except Community Silver. We have given it the 
the same heavy wearing -point overlay as Community 
Silver, and have also thickened the general plate over the 
entire spoon. In this way we have greatly increased the 
wearing quality of Reliance Plate. 

It is one thing to make changes necessary to perfect 
one's goods, but it is quite another to make these changes 
in such a way as to give no inconvenience to the trade. 
To make the transition easy we have been manufacturing 
our Silverware in this improved way since the first of the 
year, so that most of the stock now on your shelves is of 
this new quality. 

Now as to prices: It has always been the policy of 
the Oneida Community, regardless of trade traditions, to 
sell its Silverware at just as low prices as was consistent 
with quality. Ten years ago we brought out Community 
Silver in a plate heavier than triple at the same price at 
which single plate was being sold by the leading man- 
ufacturers. In making the present change we have con- 



COMMCJMTy SILVER 



k 



RELIANCE PLATE 




37 



II A K I. WAKE AND METAL 



tinued the same policy of giving great value to the trade. 
We are now offering Community Silver to the trade in a 
plate so de luxe as to rival for practical service Sterling 
silver itself, at a very slight advance over former prices. 

This small advance on both Community Silver and 
Reliance Plate is no disadvantage to their dealer, since his 
percentage of profit remains the same as before. By car- 
rying Community Silver and, Reliance Plate he now has 
a complete line of Silver Plated Ware incomparably better 
than anything on the market. Moreover, we are now 
preparing to bring these facts home to every user of 
Silverware in the country. 

In August begins a Community Silver advertising 
campaign in the magazines of the country unparalleled in 
the history of the Silverware industry. In this advertising 
campaign we will not only use a tremendous amount of 
space, but will present such strong arguments in such an 
effective way as to convince every Silverware user that 
Community Silver, if not actually the equal for practical 
service of Sterling silver, is at least incomparably better 
than any other plated ware in the market. 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd. 

ONEIDA, N. Y. 



. 




COMMGNITy SILVER 
RELIANCE PLATE 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




Small Costs-Big Results 



THE COST of a Want Ad. in Hardware and 
Metal is estimated in CENTS. 

THE RESULTS are figured in DOLLARS. 




PARKHILL, ONT., 
HARDWARE AND METAL. JAN 31st. 1910 

TORONTO. ONT. 

Gentlemen, — Kindly find enclosed P. O. Order to cover in- 
sertion of advertisement in your paper. Tools were sold three 
days following the first insertion and we are still receiving in- 
quiries from all over Canada. 

Yours very truly, 
THE STEELE HARDWARE STORE. 
Per G. F. Steele. 

EVERY retail hardware dealer, every hardware manufacturer, 
wholesaler, traveller and clerk from VANCOUVER TO 
HALIFAX is a consistent reader of HARDWARE and METAL. 
This makes a Want Ad. in Hardware and Metal the only satisfactory 
way to place your proposition before those most vitally interested. 

WOULD YOU BUY OR SELL— A Typewriter— A Show-case - 
Set of Tinner's Tools - Desk Secure a Clerk— Bookkeeper — Partner 



Use a Hardware and Metal Want Ad 



RATES : (Payable in advance) 
2c. per word first insertion, 
lc. per word subsequent insertions. 
5c. extra per insertion for box number if desired. 

Write or phone our nearest office. 




Hardware and Metal 

Montreal - Toronto 
Winnipeg 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Dominion Ammunition 

Hits Hard and Hills 




Your customer looks for this TRADE MARK on DOMINION attractively 
labelled boxes. 

Your profit is best on DOMINION. Costs your customer one-third less 
than imported. 




PRICE and QUALITY will satisfy old customers and bring you new trade. 
Reliable ammunition for all makes of Revolvers, Rifles and Shot Guns, 



ion 



Cartridge 



Co., Ltd. 
Montreal, Canada 



Henry Rogers, Sons 
& Co., Limited 



REGISTERED 



<H» 



(Established over a Century) 



sn^ 




Wolverhampton 



Sheffield H.R.S.&C- 



TRADE MARK 



EVERTTHING IN METALS 

Galvanized and Black Sheets, Canada and Tin 
Plates, Copper, Tin, Lead, Spelter, etc. 

Heavy and Shelf Hardware 

Chain, Anchors, Wire of every description, Hollow- 
ware, Poultry Netting, etc. 

Canadian branch 6 St Sacrame nt St., - Montreal 

40 — — — ^^— 



Doing Trade with Farmers on a Cash Basis 

Geo. A. Sills, Seaforth, Believes Cash Sytem Only Logical Way of Merchan- 
dising—Farmers With Savings Deposits Defer Payments To Local Merchants- 
Cash System Would Benefit the Consumer in Many Ways. 



The cash system of hardware merch- 
andising is gradually extending its 
scope of operations, and is constantly 
gaining new converts among the trade. 
It is significant, that all dealers who 
investigate the subject arrive at the 
unanimous conclusion that it would be 
a good thing both for them- and for 
their customers if the cash system 
could be universally adopted. It would 
be a good thing for the dealer, because 
it would enable him to take all cash 
discounts, and to avoid borrowing 
money from the bank. It would be a 
good thing for the customer, because 
he could buy more cheaply, and would 
not fall so easily into a hopeless state 
of indebtedness, as is possible under 
the credit system 

Does Cash System Mean Loss of Busi- 
ness. 
It is obvious that the cash system 
would be universally adopted if it were 
not for the fear haunting every dealer 
who considers the subject that some of 
his customers would be offened, if asked 
to pay cash, and he would thus lose 
business. Indeed, even those hardware- 
men who have already put the cash 
system in operation, did so with grave 
misgivings, and confess that they fully 
expected to see a falling off in sales 
during the first year at any rate., They 
would have been satisfied with the ad- 
vantages gained, even if they had ex- 
perienced a slight decrease in business. 
As a matter of fact we have yet to 
hear of the first cash selling hardware 
dealer whose business did not grow 
from the very first, under the new order 
of things. The difficulty of launohing 
the cash system having been overcome, 
and the store's customers duly educat- 
ed to its advantages, the merchant 
found that running a cash business was 
much easier than operating on the basis 
of extended credits. 

Those who still cling to a credit 
business after studying the situation, do 
so because they think there are certain 
local conditions in their towns, which 
would render cash selling a hazardous 
experiment. Some say that they can- 
not sell for cash in railroad towns, 
because pay day comes only once a 
month. Others say that their custom- 
ers are chiefly retired people, who 
would feel insulted if cash payment 
were insisted upon. Still others object 
that, doing business in a farming dis- 
trict, they cannot expect to have their 
accounts paid except at harvest time. 

About the worst offender that the 
credit system has produced, is the 



prosperous farmer with money in the 
savings hank. No doubt the spirited 
campaigns which have been carried on 
by the chartered banks to encourage 
placing money on deposit, are largely 
accountable for this. The farmer glor- 
ies in the deposit which yields 3 or 4 
per cent, interest, and, rather than 
risk a curtailment of the profits from 
his savings, he will allow his account 
with the local hardwareman to run 
three months, a year, or even longer. 
This is the condition which confronts 
Geo. A. Sills, hardware merchant, of 
Seaforth. Mr. Sills is a strong advo- 
cate of cash selling, and he has been 
converted to the idea largely because 
of the inordinately long credits expect- 
ed by the farmer. 

"One case happened last winter," 
said Mr. Sills to a Hardware and 
Metal representative, "which will give 
you a good idea of the ridiculous 
lengths to which prosperous farmers 
will go in order to keep their savings 
accounts intact. 

"In October, I installed a furnace for 
a farmer, the contract price being 
$100, and the agreement calling for 
payment February 1st. Well, February 
came around but there was no money 
forthcoming. A couple of weeks later I 
met the farmer on the street, and t re- 
minded him of his account. He told me 
he had the money in the bank all 
right, but didn't want to withdraw any 
before the end of the month because it 
would mean a loss of interest. 

"He remained obdurate on this point 
until I told him I would pay the 
month's interest myself. The interest 
ambunted to twenty-five cents, and I 
didn't mind parting with it, in order to 
get my money. But what impressed 
me, was that the farmer had no scrup- 
les in allowing me to wait an extra 
month for payment of a job that had 
kept him comfortable all winter, just 
so that he could make twenty-five cents 
interest." 

This Farmer Had Nerve. 

Another incident related by Mr. Sills 
has a decidedly humorous side. 

"This didn't happen to me," he ex- 
plained, "but was related to me by a 
hardware friend in a nearby town." 

"A farmer in good circumstances, 
owed my friend an account of $50, 
which had been running for several 
months. One day he came in to town 
with a load of hogs which he sold for 
$80. My friend heard of the transac- 
tion, and,, when the farmer entered his 
store half an hour later, he began to 
41 



mentally congratulate himself that the 
long due account was about to be set- 
tled. Imagine his surprise when the 
farmer saluted him with a request for 
a loan of $20! 

" 'I have just sold some hogs lot 
$80,' he explained, 'and I want enough 
to deposit an even hundred in the 
bank.' " 

Introducing the Cash System. 
Mr. Sills agrees that people who have 
been in the habit of buying on credit, 
instinctively dislike paying cash, and, 
indeed, feel it a hardship to do so. If 
a dealer were to spring the cash idea 
on them too suddenly he would lose 
their business. For that, reason, he ad- 
vocates an educative advertising cam- 
paign for several months before putting 
the cash system into actual operation. 
"My idea," he says, "is to thoroughly 
explain the system through the local 
paper. Tell the people how cash pay- 
emnts will give their money greater 
purchasing value, and how it will bene- 
fit them in other ways. For my own 
part I believe that hardwaremen could 
sell goods at from 7 to 10 per cent, 
cheaper, if every sale were a cash sale. 
"By advertising in this way, you not 
only succeed in educating your custom- 
ers to the benefits of the cash system, 
but also give them a chance to get 
their affairs in such shape that they 
can have money on hand to take ad- 
vantage of the cash system, when it is 
inaugurated." 

The catalogue houses have educated a 
good proportion of the public to cash 
buying, and, already, there are mur- 
murings on the part of habitual cash 
customers, who complain that they are 
helping to make up the losses accruing 
from bad debts and long "credits. It is 
to be expected that these complaints 
will grow in volume, until merchants 
can no longer do a partly cash and 
partly credit business. It must be all 
cash or all credit, and quite obvious- 
ly, the all cash stores will be able to 
offer the better values. Mr. Sills states 
that he has had several customers who 
always paid cash for their goods, com- 
plain of the unfairness of the credit 
system, to them. 

Many progressive hardware dealers are 
beginning to see that the cash system 
offers a sure solution to the problem 
of catalogue house competition. The 
local merchant has many advantages 
over the distant mail order firm, and, 
if he sold only for cash, he would also 
be able to undersell the catalogue housa 
in nearly every case. 



Necessity of Planning Lay-out of Ads. 

The Use of Panels to Make Complete Ad. More Readable — Value of White 
Space in Emphasizing Reading Matter — Ads. Should Have Well Balanced 
Lay-out. 



Isn't it surprising how tame the ma- 
jority of ads. look in country news- 
papers? Many a hardwareinan who has 
put a lol of thought and study into the 
preparation of his copy, scarcely recog- 
nizes it when lie sees it in print. He had 
expected something forceful and logical, 
and he is vastly disappointed. 

The trouble is that the compositor 
who made up the ad. did not grasp his 
idea. He emphasized the unimportant 
points, and hid the strong ones. He 
inserted fancy ornaments where only 
dignified rules were required, and, in 
brief, he spoiled much of the ad. 's ef- 
fectiveness. . 

Professional ad. writers do not take 
chances of this kind. They long ago 
came to the conclusion that, unless they 
themselves drew up a plan of the ad., 
just as an architect draws a plan of a 
house, their ideas would largely mis- 
carry, and the completed ad. would be 
altogether different in appearance from 
what they had intended. 

A Rough Lay-out. 

Of course, it would be impracticable 
to plan the ad. in the smallest detail, 
even for experienced copy writers. But 
it has become customary to draw a 
rough plan of every ad. before placing 
it in the compositors' hands. This plan 
indicates the size of the ad., and the 
manner in which it is subdivided, to 
deal with its various subjects. Unlike 
an architect's plan, it need not be drawn 
to scale, as the ordinary compositor can 
readily seize the idea as sketched in 
ever so hurried and haphazard a way. 

The most essential part of the lay-out 
is the dividing into panels. As a gen- 
eral rule, a portion of the space is pan- 
eled off for each line of goods to be ad- 
vertised. The shapfc, size and location 
of each panel depends upon the import- 
ance of the line to which it is devoted. 
Advantage of Panels. 

The use of panels affords the best 
means of separating the different parts 
of the ad. It also makes each part 
stand out from the whole almost like 
a distinct and separate ad. It is, in 
effect, the same scheme as dividing the 
reading columns of a newspaper into 
sporting page, women's page, editorial 
page and news pages. A newspaper 
reader who is not interested in sports 
can skip that page and the ad. reader 
who is equipped with an ice cream freez- 
er and washing machine can skip that 
part of the ad. and go on to something 
which will prove of interest. The panel 



idea undoubtedly invites more attention 
to the ad., and focuses the attention on 
the individual items which may make 
a special appeal to the reader. Only 
a confirmed bargain hunter will delib- 
erately wade through a jumbled and 
poor appearing advertisement, but the 
neatly arranged and paneled copy is 
bound to catch many of those who are 
simply taking a cursory glance through 
the paper. 

Value of White Space. 

Another virtue of the panel idea is 
that it results in a display of white 
space, which not only makes the panels 
themselves stand out, but also lends 
prominence to the whole ad. 

There was a time when advertisers 
thought that to get the worth of their 
money it was necessary to completely 
fill their space with reading matter. It 
did not take long for the shrewd ones 



HOT WEATHER COOK 5T0VE5 



ftRfECTIONCOIUPIlSlOVn 




PRICE j = 



VAPOR GA50UN151WB 



price | = 



HOT MAST COM (III 5T0VCS 



£' 
.^ 



THE VERY BEST VALUE ^ 

EVER OFFERED FOR *|2* ^ 

COME IN AND EXAMINE THESE STOVE 

ADAM50N HARDWARE C°0tamE»u 



to learn that without a margin of white 
space surounding the type matter, the 
ad. was literally juried. A panelled 
ad. is simply a further development of 
this same idea, for it is a collection of 
small ads., each enclosed in a margin of 
white space. 

Example of Bad Arrangement. 

On the opposite page the advertise- 
ment of the Adamson Hardware Co. is 
an example of the compositor defeat- 
ing to a certain extent, the purpose of 
the ad., by not analyzing the copy, and 
giving it a proper arrangement. 

This advertisement as a whole deals 
with "Hot Weather Cooking Stoves," 
and this line should therefore appear as 
the headline. The subject is divided 
into three classes — Perfection Coal Oil 
Stoves, Vapor Gasoline Stoves and Hot 

42 



Blast Coal Oil Stoves. The ideal way, 
therefore, would be to divide the ad. 
into three panels, heading each panel 
according to the article it advertised. 
As the "Hot Blast" stove is evidently 
being featured by the firm, it should 
occupy the most important panel. 

The task in this instance, is some- 
what complicated, owing to the size of 
the cut to be used. It is, among some 
ad. writers, an accepted maxim that 
the cut should be made to fit the copy, 
and not the copy to fit the cut. But 
this is not practicable for the large 
majority of retail merchants, who se- 
cure their cuts from the jobbers and 
manufacturers, and have to take the 
sizes that are available. The arrange- 
ment, therefore, in the Adamson Hard- 
ware Co. 's ad., has to be varied slightly 
from the ideal plan, so as to work in 
this cut. 

How to Plan Lay-out. 

Having analyzed the advertising copy, 
and chosen the important divisions, the 
•ad. writer is in a position to plan his 
lay-out. Some may find it advisable to 
draw up the plan even before writing 
the copy. At any rate, he must know 
what he is going to write about, before 
he makes his- plan. 

The accompanying cut shows one good 
lay-out for the Adamson Hardware 
Co. 's advertisement, taking into con- 
sideration the awkward size of the cut 
to be used. A bold headline is employ- 
ed for the complete ad. and lesser head- 
lines for the panels into which the ad. 
is subdivided. It will be noticed that 
this arrangement also allows for a more 
prominent reproduction of the firm's 
name, than the original ad. 

In preparing this plan, the exact size 
of the original ad. was adopted, and ar- 
rangement made to accommodate the 
same copy. It is sketched roughly as 
may be seen, but any compositor could 
follow this plan in setting up a panelled 
advertisement which would stand out. 

Review of The Week's Ads. 

Some hardware advertisements which 
have appeared during the past week, 
have been selected for brief review, and 
are reproduced on the opposite page. 
A Talk on Hot Weather Stoves. 

Ad. No. 1 gives some good informa- 
tion about three different kinds of hot 
weather stoves. The main fault with 
this ad. lies in its arrangement, as al- 
ready stated. Another correction that 
should be made is in quoting prices on 
the Perfection coal oil stoves and Vapor 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



gasoline stoves. The arguments are ex- 
pressed in a somewhat disjointed way, 
and the ad. would he more readable if 
the short and choppy phrases were con- 
nected into brief sentences. 

A Convincing Gate Ad. 
In ad. No. 2, W. F. Macpherson, of 
Preseott, has wisely made two distinct 
divisions; using one for haying tools 
and equipment, and the other for steel 
gates. The gate ad. is admirable, and 
it is hard to see how any farmer whose 
property is not properly equipped with 
gates, could resist its appeal. If the 
price were quoted on two or three 
standard sizes, it should prove an even 
better proposition. An ad. which does 
not quote prices, is handicapped from 
the start as it is difficult to turn a 
reader into a prospective purchaser, 
without telling him the price of the 
article he is reading about. It is often 
this which crystallizes mild interest, 
into a determination to buy. 

A Pump Proposition. 

Ad. No. 3, like No. 1, has -a poor 
typographical arrangement. It could be 
vastly improved by making the words, 
"This is pump time" occupy one line 
only. This would give more room for 
the body of the ad., which could be 
condensed so as to allow a good dis- 
play of white space around the reading 
matter — always a desirable thing. 

A Pure Announcement. 

No. 4 belongs to the old style an- 
nouncement class. It possesses the vir- 
tue of being quite well arranged, but, 
lacking illustrations relating to the sub- 
ject advertised, and not quoting any 
prices it is not likely to prove very ef- 
fective. There is probably no other line 
which gives such scope for illustration. 
A cut of a fisherman casting his fly 
will instantly arouse interest in the 
seasoned sportman, and even a simple 
cut of a fish or some part of the usual 
fishing equipment, would give anima- 
tion to the ad. A description of some 
of the specialties in the shape of fishing 
tackle carried by the store, together 
with prices, would have combined with 
a cut such as suggested above, so as to 
produce a good result bringing adver- 
tisement. 

House Cleaning Not Popular now. 

Speaking generally, she would be a 
most ambitious housewife who would 
essay to cleanse her home in the kind 
of weather which has been provided re- 
cently. Consequently, ad. No. 5 must 
be adjudged unseasonable, and almost 
sure to be ineffectual in promoting sales 
It is to be commended, however, for the 
illustrations, and the prices which are 
quoted. Hardwaremen should always 
prepare their advertisements with a 

Continued on Page 46 



Hot Weather Cook Stoves. 
Perfection coal oil cook stoves 

This itor* Is correctly named "PERFECTION." Complete ia ewr 4* 
tail, mad* of «teel with legs high enough to stand t* floor laurtetd of box> 
! inc. can be moved around ac needed, cylinder* are granite-ware pale faloa 
1 In color, look attractive, and rust proof. It la a wfok atore ana la much 
easier to operate and keep clean than a wlckleas rt**e. It will not nniofce, 
nor sweli-we guarantee satisfaction sea them and tow will appreciate the 
quality and beauty-sold In 2 and 3 Burners, 

IN VAPOR GASOLINE COOK STOVES. 

i The highest point of perfection in Gasoline stove aonatrcetlon t* reach- 
ed in the production of this elegaut store SIMPLE AND DURABLE— . 
PERFECT COMBUSTION Absolutely Safe— No smoke— No odcsjsrfok nn*w 
tire— great heat -■-,; , jaV ■) 



MACPHERSONS HARDWARE STORE 





£ Hot Blast Coal t'&ttt 




* Quick Heater, the* 
very Best Value ever 
Offered for $,.« 




^ We will appreciate Your Viaift 
SL of Inspection. 




| aoamson mm & 




^ ORANGEVTLLE 



A Gate for Every Need 

DO YOU WANT A GATE 

That Is strong enough to hold back 
your breach? bulls ? 
That your rmira ran't shove under? 
That you enn mine W> swing over 
snowdrifts or U> piss bogs ana sheep 
under while it hulds back your other 
stock ? 

That the children can open with one 

band while stock can't open it rft all ? 

That is made of High Carbon Steel 

, Tubing 1 and heavy wire fabric— no 

-' second-bund pipe or gnu pipe. 

That will not sag, burn or rot out. 
< «u« will het a lifetime. 
[ w That is cheaper than wooden gates, 
it will outlast a down . 




A Fine Hay Crop 
is Sure 



Are you reariv to baodle it. 

Louden's Steel Track Hav 
Carrier outfits are the best on 
the market. We have them 
in stock and will be pleased to 
give you estimates on your 
barns. 

4-Straod Pure Manilla Buy 
Fork Rope. Pure stock, pli- 
able and stronger than 3-pIy 
, and coats oo more. 
iy Forks, Pulleys and 
Hooks. 



A/O, 




-m- m ••••••»•»■ 



This is 
Pump Time 

Don't leave off putting in a new 
pump or repairing the old one until']! 
fall. Now is the time to get ready 
We sup plypumps ready-fitted to drop, 
into the well any depth. Also cylin- 
ders, strainers, check valves, pipe and 
fittings all sizes, Our pumps range in 
price complete ' from $2.00 to $20.00 
each. See us before buying. 



H. H. OTTON & SON 

FIVE POINTS HARDWARE STORE 



W. F. MACPHERSON 

I HARDWARE PRESCOTT | 



■ ' ' ■ ' I B I i "r =!■ ' -"■ 

♦ FISHING TACKLE if 



The fi-liing season is-m full Swing now <»nd we are 
supplied with the best (felling tackle on tlic market. 
Among our supplies lire: — 



RODS 

REELS 
FLIES 
SPEARS 
FLOATS 



BAITS 

LINES 
HOOKS 

SILK-WORM GUT 



We are Sole Agents in West Durham for the Bayn 
1 and Tudhope Carriages, Tobin Guns. Whipple 
'■' Horse Collars, OneMinute Wssher. Brandham- 
1 Henderson Paints. Supreme Steel and 

' Cast Range, Goodyear Auto Tires, Cleveland 
„ Bicycles, Ferfect.00 Oil Stoves. Buster Brown Wago 



MASON & DALE, 



* 



Phone us. 



11 — T 



■ 



■ 

D 

■ 

D 

■ 





/V O. 4- 



A/O 3 



Spring Cleaning Requirements 



There is do better time than now to get that 

Sew Washing Machine 

We have, among others.Hhe Round Re-Actinf? 

... ..at $8.50 

rbe New Century at $8.00 and $9.00 

rne One Minute at $10.00 

Conoona Ball-bearing at $10T00 



WINGERS, without own writ- 
^Jarantee at $4.28 to $9.00 





BROOMS 
a special 6- 
atrinff line 
36c 
SCRUB 

BR CSHE8 
8c to 30c 



WASHtuBS 
wood or (calvan- 
zed Iron at 
75c.. 85c.. & 85c. 




Natural Gas Appliances 



•■^BSEfl^SPags^ 




Gas Ranges and Gas Heaters 

Gas Kilting clone !>y good workmen 

J. Y. SMILEY 



At my 

Hard ware Store 



WASHBOARDS 

Ordinary , at 260 
Glass at 35c 



l*= 



77*. 6 



Also— Pails, Step Ladders, Carpet Sweepers. Vacuum Cleaners, kc 

A. & O/IDEMAN 

A/o. s* 



SURE DEATH ! 

To potato bugs, if you use Chas. Sar- 
gent's Paris Green, which is 
guaranteed to be abso- 
lutely pure. 



Sprinkling Cans 

and Sprayers 
of all kinds. 

CHARLES SARGENT, claremont 




Hardware Advertisements Se lected for Review. 

43 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN - President 

Publisher! of Trad* Newspapers which circulate in the Provinces 
of British Columbia. Alberta. Saskatchewan. Manitoba, Ontario. Que- 
bec. Nora Scotia. New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland 

CABLE ADDRESSES 

CANADA : Macpubco, Toronto. ENGLAND : Atabek. London, En*-. 

OFFICES 

Montreal 701-702 Eastern Townships Bank Building. Phone Main 1255 

Toronto ... 143-149 University Avenue- Phone Main 7324 

Winnipeg 34 Royal Bank Building- Phone Garry 2313 

Vancouver, B.C. H. Hodgson, 11 Hartney Chambers 

London. Eng- • E. J. Dodd. 88 Fleet Street, E.C. Phone Central 12960 
New York - R. B. Huestis. US Broadway. N.Y. Phone 2282 Cortlandt 
France - - John F.Jones & Co., 31bis Faubourg Montmartre, Paris 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada and United States, $2: Great Britain, 8s. 6d. : elsewhere. 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 



FIRE INSURANCE AN ABSOLUTE NECESSITY. 

The terrible fire which devastated Northern Ontario 
during the past week has taught some costly lessons, 
and one of the costliest is that fire insurance, however 
dear it may be, is an absolute necessity to a business 
man. 

In the burned area, owing to the dense forests and 
the primitive nature of most of the buildings, a high 
insurance was demanded. Ten per cent, was an ordinary 
premium, and only a small proportion of the inhabitants 
could be induced to place any insurance at this abnormal 
cost. They preferred to run the risk of loss rather than 
to pay for protection, at this rate. 

The great fire has burned out every place of business 
in several prosperous towns and many of these business 
men are ruined, because they carried no insurance. This 
event proves the utter folly of trusting to luck, in this 
matter. Every business man owes it to himself and to 
the firms with whom he does business to keep his build- 
ings and stock well covered with insurance. The fact 
that the rate is high, simply furnishes an additional 
reason for securing the protection, because it means that 
the risk is also high. While insurance companies, in 
many cases, undoubtedly ask a higher rate than is reason- 
able, still the difference in their rates, in different places, 
is a pretty good indication of the relatively high risks. 

This brings up the question of determining the cost 
of goods. A hardwareman who pays an insurance rate 
of ten per cent, and does not consider this when deter- 
mining the selling prices of his goods, is most unwise, 
and will lose a large share of legitimate profit. Insur- 
ance is as important an item as freight, in the cost of 
merchandise, and it should not be neglected in the ac- 
counting. 



HUMOROUS FEATURES OF THE CREDIT BUSINESS 

The man with a sense of humor can generally take a 
little satisfaction out of any situation, and it is a good 
thing for a hardware merchant to be so equipped, if he 
is to get full enjoyment out of his vocation. 

The credit system of retailing, as generally practised, 
does not, at first sight, present many laughable features. 
In fact, it may be said to be the bane of many a dealer's 
existence. When a draft falls due and there is little 
money in the bank with which to meet it, the fact that 
book debts overbalance the draft many times, affords 
scant satisfaction, and the average hardwareman would 
not be likely to see anything humorous in the situation. 



However, two really humorous incidents about the 
workings of the credit system, have recently come to light. 
In one case, a hardwareman installed a furnace for a well- 
to-do farmer, on the understanding that payment was to 
be made on February 1st. That date came around in due 
course, but there was no sign of the farmer and his 
money. Meeting him on the street one day, the dealer 
reminded him of his promise, and elicited the very naive 
excuse that he hadn't paid the account because he 
wanted to keep the money in the bank a month longer, 
and draw so much more interest. The interest on the 
amount involved, for one month, would have been twenty- 
five cents. 

The other incident is even more ridiculous. A farmer 
in good circumstances, owed an account of fifty dollars, 
to a hardwareman in his nearest town. The account had 
been running for some time, in spite of the fact that the 
farmer was known to have money in the bank. One day, 
the farmer drove into the town with a load of hogs which 
he disposed of for eighty dollars. He then walked into 
the hardware store and coolly asked the dealer to loan 
him twenty dollars, which he could add to the eighty he 
had on hand, and thus make up a deposit of an even 
hundred dollars. 

It is such incidents as these, which turn thoughtful 
merchants inevitably toward the adoption of a strictly 
cash system. 



LOOKING BACKWARD. 

A business man who has been so successful that he is 
able to retire into private life at a comparatively early 
age should be able to give some valuable advice to those 
who are still in the harness. Like an old baseball star 
watching a game from the grand stand, he sees oppor- 
tunities and also errors of judgment which do not appear 
to those who are in the heat of the contest. 

Such a man is "Mack," who contributes the "Reflec- 
tions of a Retired Hardwareman," in this issue. Al- 
though still a comparatively young man, "Mack" has 
had a varied business experience, and, if his real name 
were mentioned, it would be recognized by hundreds of 
our readers. As a traveler, in his younger days, he called 
on the hardware trade, finally combining with his brother 
who had also been a traveling salesman, to purchase a 
hardware store in a Western Ontario city. 

The two brothers made good and, when they disposed 
of the business in April, 1910, both were able to retire 
from active commercial pursuits. The brother, being an 
expert bowler, readily found a congenial method of pass- 
ing the time, but "Mack" finds his chief relaxation in 
watching the game from which he has retired. Observing 
present-day tendencies in the trade, it is his habit to weigh 
them in the scale of his successful experience, and pass 
judgment upon their merits. As an occasional contribu- 
tor of his "Reflections," in the columns of Hardware," 
and Metal, "Mack" will make a valuable "coach" for 
hardwaremen now in training. 



WIDE VOGUE OF NEW COOKERY. 

Paper-bag cookery is becoming more than a fad in 
England. So firm a hold has it taken that experiments 
are being conducted in all parts of the country. One of 
the London daily papers has started a motor campaign, 
with a traveling kitchen and an expert chef, to demon- 
strate the advantages of this new method of preparing 
food. Ironmongers are taking advantage of the wide- 



44 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



spread vogue of the idea to stock up with supplies of the 
paper envelopes used, and are having large sales. 

It is claimed that it is possible to cook a whole din- 
ner at the same time by the "en papillote" method — 
joint, eggs, vegetables, and pudding. Each article comes 
out done to a turn, with all its flavor and goodness pre- 
served by the covering. Loud praise is heard on all 
sides, but there is at the same time an undercurrent of 
skepticism shown. Many who have tried the method re- 
port failure to achieve the results claimed by the in- 
ventors, and there is some difference of opinion on the 
score of the fuel consumption. 

It is probable that in restaurants, where food is al- 
ways prepared in large quantities, the new method would 
save gas very considerably. In the bigger establishments 
it is being taken up eagerly. 

® 



FOLLY OF RENTING OR LOANING. 

A correspondent writes an amusing letter from Palm- 
erston, Ont., commenting on the idea of a Stratford hard- 
wareman, in renting such articles as rat traps. 

It seems a strange thing that people should expect the 
hardwareman to accommodate them by loaning thorn, 
v ithout cost, tools and other goods which he is in busi- 
ness to sell. Yet there is scarcely a hardware store any 
place which does not meet this difficulty. Someone (gener- 
ally a neighboring retailer in another line of business) 
juns in and asks for the use of a hammer or saw, '"just 
for half an hour. ' ' The same borrower may return for 
t Le same article several times during the course of a 
>ear, and he has no more right to expect such consider- 
ation from the hardwareman, than the householder who 
bujs these tools because he occasionally requires to use 
Ihcra around the house. 

What chance would the hardwareman have if he 
visiied his friend's haberdashery, and asked for the loan 
of a dress shirt "just for to-nigh' ?'' Or i£ he should 
perchance drop into the book store and ask for the use 
• ■I' the latest novel, "just long enough to read it," would 
he be politely received? 

It is good busmess for the hardwareman to rent such 
articles as vacuum cleaners, but it is time to decide that 
staple hardware goods are neither to be loaned nor 
rented — they are to be sold. 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Paints are still in heavy demand. Do not be afraid 
to still accord paint a place in your store windows. 

• * * 

Hardware factories are extending in all parts of the 
country. This augurs well for the future prosperity of 
the trade. 

• * * 

It is generally anticipated that the coming fall will 
see a record sale of stoves. Plan now to get your share 
of the business. 

• * • 

The hardwareman who sold twenty-four screen doors 
as the direct result of one ad., cleared thereby his ad- 
vertising expenses for some time. 
» * * 

Paper bag cookery has invaded Canada. Some en- 
thusiasts predict that we will all have our Christmas 
turkey roasted this year a la papilotte. 

• • • 

It may seem sadly out of season to mention stoves 
with the mercury still "aviating," but, nevertheless, the 
time is now close at hand when the dealer will have to 
plan out his fall campaign. 

» » • 

The announcement that Toronto street cars will carry 
free all boys with lacrosse sticks, and that the Scarboro 
Beach oval will be open to them should create a boom 
in the sporting goods department. 

• • • 

The price-cutter is a "mean critter." He not only 
spoils his own chance to make a fair profit, but he does 
his best to provide losses for his competitors. He is pur- 
suing a dog-in-the-manger policy. 

• • • 

Spasmodic advertising is about as much use as the 
first thunderstorm, which struck the superheated sections 
of Ontario last week. It was over too soon and the 
drouth conditions were as bad as ever in a few hours. 

• • • 

The hardwareman who loaned $20 to a slow pay 
customer already owing him $50, in order that he might 
deposit an even hundred in the bank, deserves to take 
rank with Job, among the long suffering heroes of his- 
tory. 



THE WISDOM OF EARLY ORDERING. 

Order early. The stove situation at present points 
strongly the wisdom of that course. A stove manufac- 
turer states that enough orders have already been placed 
to insure the taking up of the complete output of his 
firm. If the same is true in all quarters, it is pretty con- 
clusive proof that one of the busiest seasons on record 
is ahead. It is also safe to reason that the dealer who 
waits until the last minute to place his orders, will prob- 
ably have to wait before the orders are filled. An early 
order insures early delivery. "Come early and avoid the 
rush" applies in this case. 

Delayed orders are frequently shipped on the install- 
ment plan. This is not the fault of the manufacturer. 
The demand for stoves has grown so rapidly of late 
years, that, when the season is at its height, the supply 
can barely keep pace with the demand. The wise dealer, 
therefore, is the one who decides on what he will require 
ami puts in his order bright and early. 



This very week, we read a Burk's Falls hardware 
store advertisement, the opening sentence of which was: 
"Spring is already in the air, although Winter still holds 
the earth in his frosty grip." If this were only true, 
what a rush our panting readers would make for Burk's 
Falls. 

• • • 

Hardware travelers are reported to have covered their 
rounds just the same during the hot spell. Traveling 
salesmen are expected, of course, to be impervious to at- 
mospheric discomforts, but the brand supplied during the 
past week was sufficient to try the patience of a sala- 
mander. 

• • • 

Having descended from the very topmost to the low- 
est rung on the price ladder, turpentine is reported to 
have steadied down at last. Although it is morally cer- 
tain that "turps" will not break any more altitude 
records for a while, the latest report is that an upward 
trend is now in order. 



45 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



NECESSITY OF PLANNING LAY- 
OUT OF ADS. 
Continued from Page IS 

s ku to securing results, and. with thai 
object in view, frequent change of copy, 
and the advertising of distinctly season- 
able goods becomes imperative. 
An Invitation. 
Ladies arc especially invited, in ad. 
No. 6, but, from the standpoint of re- 
sults, the invitation is not definite 
enough. The ad. does not state whether 
they are mvited to a stove demonstra- 
of the modern variety, or simply to 



visit tlie store and view the stock. Con- 
sidering that natural gas has just very 
recently become available to Aylmerites, 
Mr. Smiley could have used his space to 
splendid advantage in telling about the 
construction of his gas stoves and what 
they would do, also giving an idea of 
the prices at which he is selling. 

Sure Death. 

Ad. No. 7 is illustrated, but the cut 
chosen does not seem to bear a very 
close relation to the subject. It would 
be better suited to an advertisement of 
screen doors and windows. 



Lightning-proof Qualities of Metal Roofing 

Time is Opportune for Driving Home This Truth — Keep Tab 
on Farm Buildings Destroyed by Lightning — Co-operation With 
Manufacturers Should Secure Good Business. 



There is one important aspect of me- 
tal roofing which should be brought to 
the attention of prospective builders, 
just now, and that is the well establish- 
ed fact that a metal roof protects the 
building it covers, from lightning. 

During the past week, many districts 
have been visited by severe electrical 
storms, which, as usual, have worked 
the greatest havoc among farm build- 
ings. It is the isolated barn or imple- 
ment shed which is the easiest mark for 
the the thunderbolt, and that is why, 
after each heavy storm in summer, the 
daily newspapers contain reports of 
many barns and other farm buildings 
which have been struck by lightning, and 
destroyed. 

Metal Roofs Shed the Bolt. 

It is not claimed that metal roofing 
renders a building proof against being 
struck by lightning, but it seems to be 
scientifically established, that, if light- 
ning should strike a metal roof, the 
electrical fluid would be scattered over 
the whole surface, and thus be unable to 
do any damage. 

One of the large Canadian metal roofing 
concerns recently sent out a circular let- 
ter to the secretaries of all the mutual 
fire insurance companies operating in On- 
tario. These companies, almost without 
exception, write their business in coun- 
try districts, and, as they have, as a 
rule, continued under the same manage- 
ment for a good many years, they have 
naturally had more experience with 
lightning damages, than most of the old 
line companies. 

A series of questions were asked in 
this circular letter, relative to the va- 
lue of metal roofing as a protection 
against lightning, the insurance men be- 
ing asked both as to facts which had 
come under their observation, and also 



their own opinion on the subject, based 
upon their experience. They were also 
invited to offer suggestions for rendering 
a metal roofed building absolutely immune 
to lightning, if they believed that the 
metal roof alone would not accomplish 
the desired results. 

Insurance Experts Almost Unanimous. 
The replies received from these practical 
men, were almost unanimous in bearing 
put the scientific contention. Only 
about two per cent, had ever heard of a 
metal-roofed building being damaged by 
lightning, and it is safe to infer that, in 
these cases, the metal-roofed buildings 
were, in some way connected with other 
buildings not so roofed, and the bolt 
might easily have struck the other build- 
ing and the fire spread to the metal- 
roofed structure. 

Practically all of the replies (and it 
might be stated that the secretaries an- 
swered almost without exception), were 
to the effect that the writers had never 
known of lightning doing any damage to 
buildings covered with metal. Most of 
them said that they believed such a con- 
tingency would be impossible. 

Two or three of the correspondents, 
suggested that wires should be run from 
the four corners of the roof down to 
moist earth, which they stated would 
make assurance doubly sure, and abso- 
lutely safeguard a building against the 
possibility of harm from lightning. 

Would Reduce Insurance Rates. 

It is significant of the opinion held by 
expert insurance men, that several of 
the replies referred to, contained the in- 
formation that their companies were 
prepared to grant a lower rate, in the 
case of buildings roofed with metal. 
Still others said that, although no ac- 
tion had as yet been taken in the mat- 
46 



cer they felt assured that their directors 
would sanction a lower rate in such 
cases. 

This evidence is conclusive, as to the 
lightning proof qualities of metal roof- 
ing. How is the dealer going to turn it 
to his advantage ? 

Now is the time to act. As already 
stated, this is the season of thunder- 
storms, and it is the most opportune 
time to call the attention of farmers to 
the advantages of metal as a roofing 
material. Do not neglect to get in 
touch, immediately, with farmers whose 
buildings have been destroyed by light- 
ning. Give them literature which will 
be readily supplied by any of the metal 
roofing manufacturers. Further, send 
their names to the manufacturer, who 
will be glad to enter into correspondence, 
with them, on your behalf. This is the 
kind of co-operation which leads to pro- 
fits. 

The Fall Trade. 

As a general rule, there is not a 
great deal of barn building in the fall. 
There is, however, always a certain 
amount of this done in every locality, 
and the farmers who are intending to 
build, will have made up their minds by 
this time. This thunderstorm period is 
also the time to secure their favorable 
opinion of metal roofing. Hearing of so 
many fellow-farmers losing crops and 
stock through the burning of their barns, 
they will naturally desire to guard 
against this danger in their own case. 
They are therefore in a receptive mood 
for the kind of arguments that are used 
by the metal roofing manufacturers. 
Give the manufacturers a chance to help 
you sell roofing to these farmers, and 
they will gladly avail themselves of the 
opportunity. 



NO BLAME ATTACHED TO THE 
ROSS RIFLE. 

The Quebec Chronicle explains in a 
recent issue that the alleged 
report of the explosion of two 
Ross rifles furnished the Queen's 
Own was not due to any defect in the 
rifle, but to the fact that the rifles after 
delivery were handed over to another 
company to be fitted with a special 
sight. 

In fitting the sight the barrels were 
tapped to admit a screw instead of 
soldering on the barrel as in the Lee 
Enfield— or with rings, as with the re- 
gular Ross sights, to hold the rear of 
the back sight in place; this weakened 
the barrel and caused it to explode. 
When this was realized all the rifles 
which had been thus wrongly treated 
were, of course, ordered to be with- 
drawn. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardwaremen Suffer in Northern Ontario Fires 

Frank A. Child Loses Stores at Cochrane and Kelso Mines, 
and Probably at Matheson — Makes Hasty Trip to Toronto to 
Buy New Stock and Will Restart in Business Under Canvas. 



Toronto, July 13. — The disastrous 
fires which have swept so large an area 
in the new sections of Northern On- 
tario have caused a heavy loss to Frank 
A. Child, proprietor of three hardware 
stores in that part of the country. His 
stores at Cochrane and Kelso Mines 
have been burned to the ground, and the 
third, which is at Matheson, is in seri- 
ous danger. Mr. Child has been hourly 
in expectation of news as to the fate 




FRANK A. CHILD, 

Of Cochrane, Whose Hardware Interests 

In the Burned Section Were 

Very Extensive. 

of the Matheson district. It is feared 
that the flames will include that town 
in their devastating sweep. 

Mr. Child was at Parry Sound with 
his family when the news of the disaster 
reached him from his brother Charles, 
who had been managing the Cochrane 
store. Cochrane had been burned to 
the ground from limit to limit, the only 
building left being the T. & N. 0. sta- 
tion. The hardware store had suffered 
along with the rest, building and stock 
being destroyed totally. The members 
of the staff escaped without injury. 

Nothing daunted by the severe re- 
verse, Mr. Child took the first train 
to Toronto, with the intention of buying 
a new stock, and preparing to restart 



in business almost without a day's re- 
lay. 

He was seen by a representative of 
Hardware and Metal to-day at the 
Prince George Hotel. "This bush fire 
has been positively the worst in my ex- 
perience," he stated. "However, we 
do not intend to lose time in bewailing 
our losses. By Monday we will be in 
business again, I hope. I feel quite 
confident that Cochrane will grow up 
again in a very short time, and on a 
better and more permanent basis." 

He estimates that the total loss will 
be about $500,000 in Cochrane, a great 
part of which is not covered by insur- 
ance. The heavy loss will not prove 
more serious than a temporary setback, 
however. The town had been prosper- 
ing and is bound to soon catch up. 

Had a Large Place. 

The Cochrane store was a building of 
ample proportions, with a large ware- 
house" attached. He carried there a 
staff of seven men and, as it was his 
main store, most of his stock was stor- 
ed there. Mr. Child had been planning 
to close his branch at Kelso Mines, and 
much of the stock there had been ship- 
ped to Cochrane. Manager Walter 
Thompson of the Kelso Mines branch 
had one clerk with him, and the two 
men remained at that place until Mon- 
day, helping to fight the fire. Finally, 
they were compelled to abandon it and 
return to Cochrane, where they met 
with the same experience over again. 

The fire at Cochrane started about 
three-quarters of a mile from the Child 
store. As there was a wind raging at 
the time from 40 to 50 miles an hour, 
it soon caused the blaze to spread to 
all parts. 

Mr. Child states that he carried a 
$14,000 stock at Cochrane. On this he 
carried insurance for $7,000 or $8,000, 
so that his actual loss will not be as 
heavy as that of many others who were 
burned out and who did not carry in- 
surance of any kind. 

Will Start in Tents. 

Mr. Child is arranging to recommence 
business with characteristic energy. "I 
spent over $6,000 yesterday," he stated. 
"I have bought an almost complete 
stock to start with — stoves, tinware, 
household goods and all varieties of 
hardware. In addition, I have bought 
tents, and to-night I leave for Cochrane 
on the 8.30 train, taking an extra man 
with me. The goods have already gone 
47 



ahead. By Monday, I hope to have 
the stock in the tents, and we will open 
for business. ' ' 

Will Rebuild at Once. 

He will continue to do business under 
canvas until a new store can be built. 
Construction work will be started with- 
out a week's delay. He has decided that 
his new store will be of solid cement 
construction. It will be a two-storey 
building, 32 by 65 feet, with a large 
warehouse at the rear. The present plans 
of the proprietor call for everything 
up to date, including a hot water heating 
plant. 

"The town will be rebuilt," declares 
Mr. Child,, "in a better way, I hope. 
Necessary restrictions will be placed and 
it will be seen to that proper fire pro- 
tectionary measures are adopted. We 
will then be able to secure a better rate 
for insurance. It cost me ten per cent, 
to carry what I did. As a result of 
the rate a great many people did not 
carry any insurance, and they are now 
facing a total loss." 

"What I fear is that this fire may 
set back the waterworks scheme. We 
were to have had waterworks in three 
months' time in the town and we were 
planning a plumbing department. A 
water system is badly needed there. 

"As "you noted some time ago," he 
continued, "I intended to open a branch 
store at Porcupine. Luckily this plan 
was not carried out." 

He is anxious to secure catalogues 
from manufacturers and wholesalers 
without delay at his Cochrane store. 
All his books and literature of that 
nature suffered, of course, in the fire. 

Another Sufferer. 

There was one other hardware store 
in Cochrane, owned by J. McManus, 
who had been in business about the 
same length of time as Mr. Child. His 
loss will also be heavy. 



RE-ORGANIZATION IS COMPLETE. 

The reorganization of Rice Lewis & 
Co., announced some weeks ago, has been 
completed. In accordance with the po- 
licy laid down immediately after the 
fire in 1908 and given put on Dec. 5, 
1908, in Hardware and Metal, a number 
of the senior members of the staff will 
be affiliated with A. E. Gilverson and 
R. C. Fisher, the joint owners. The 
new board is made up of A. E., Gilver- 
son, R. C. Fisher, Walter J. Lasson, 
Jas. W. McMillan, E. R. Kastner and 
Fergus E. MacDonald. All of these 
gentlemen have been with Rice Lewis & 
Son for many years. 

The business will be conducted under 
the presidency and direction of A. E. 
Gilverson and R. C. Fisher. 



Our Page for Hardware Clerks 



MAKING THE VACATION INSTRUC- 
TIVE. 

Now that vacation season is at hand, 
most of the readers of this page will be 
planning for their annual holiday trip. 
Some will be making for a pleasant 
watering place, and others will be going 
"back to the farm" to spend a couple 
of weeks. Still others will visit the 
nearest large city to get a taste of met- 
ropolitan life, but they will all go back 
to the store feeling fresher and brisker, 
and more able to perform their duties 
as a result of their relaxation. 

A mighty good idea for hardware 
clerks to follow, is to spend at least 
part of their vacation in a city where 
some of the goods they sell over the 
counter are manufactured. Many clerks 
have already adopted this plan, and they 
find themselves well repaid. Invariably 
they receive most courteous treatment 
at the hands of the manufacturers up- 
on whom they call and a competent per- 
son is delegated to show them through 
the factory. 

They see the raw material being un- 
loaded from the cars, and they trace its 
course through the many ponderous and 
intricate machines, until it finally em- 
erges as the finished product. They 
visit the shipping department and 
watch the assistants busily packing the 
goods, stenciling the initials of the con- 
signee, and making out their shipping 
bills. 

Then they visit the office, and learn 
something of the system of attending to 
correspondence of keeping the books, of 
guiding the movements of a corps of 
travelers. Probably they will be amazed 
at the infinite pains taken to look after 
the smallest detals of the business. 

Any clerk who spends two or three 
hours in the plant and office of an im- 
portant hardware manufacturing con- 
cern, must needs be a bigger clerk than 
he was before. He knows something 
about a certain line of goods that he 
never knew before, and, having seen 
for himself from what material and in 
what way it is made, he feels much 
more confident when he brushes up 
against a tough customer who must be 
convinced before he will buy. 

Take so common an article as a ham- 
mer, for instance. The clerk may have 
wondered, while selling hammers, how 
they came by their peculiar shape, but 
it is not until he actually sees the ham- 
mer head pounded into shape in a series 
of heavy drop forges, and tempered in 



oil, that he can understand the selling 
points of a hammer. 

Undoubtedly the best holiday for an 
ambitious hardware clerk, is one which 
combines pleasure and the opportunity 
for acquiring business knowledge. 



WHERE LACK OF KNOWLEDGE 
LOST THE SALE. 

The old gentleman had evidently been 
attracted by the window devoted largely 
to fishing tackle, and naturally the dis- 
play of rods that were something of a 
feature. I chanced to be near at hand 
and heard the whole conversation he 
held with the clerk. 

"Do you keep Bristol rods in your 
stock," he asked the clerk, who engag- 
ingly enquired if there was something he 
could do. 

"What kind, sir?" the clerk asked. 
"Bristol rods," the old gentleman re- 
plied. "You know Bristol fishing 
rods. ' ' 

"Oh, yes, fishing rods. We've got 
something nice," the clerk answered, 
glad to understand something about the 
article required. Apparently the word 
Bristol had no meaning whatever. If 
a long rod or a short rod had been asked 
for it would have meant just the same. 
The customer wanted something in fish- 
ing rods and that was the cue to open 
up on the goods that were carried. 

So the clerk took several from a rack 
and jointed them into their lengths and 
was preparing to interest the customer 
But the latter wanted one particular 
kind. 

"Don't you keep the Bristol rod?" 
and then the customer had to explain 
that this rod was manufactured by a 
particular company. 

The clerk apparently had not heard 
of it, and this fact defeated him. He 
did not try to sell any of the other steel 
and split bamboo poles, nor a line. His 
feet were knocked from under him, so 
to speak. Perhaps this customer did 
not want to buy one, but it was rather 
safe to say that he was sincere and that 
he was going to buy a fishing rod. If 
he did, it was at some other store. — 
Curiosity. 



SELLING A FISHING POLE.. 

Will a jointed fishing pole withstand 
the pull of a big fish? 

Here is a question that is generally 

48 



asked by prospective purchasers, and 
knowing where there is a good sporting 
department in charge of a live clerk, I 
hied myself to this young clerk one of 
whose duties is to grin at all the fish 
stories he hears from tourists and 
amateur fishermen who find their way 
into the city. 

I told him I wanted to see something 
in fishing poles. For the reason that 
he had none of the old style one piece 
bamboo species he did not introduce me 
to them. 

"Here is as neat a little rod as I 
have in the store," he said as he put 
together the three lengths of a light steel 
affair hardly as thick as a pencil. "See 
the cork handle, and the patented sys- 
tem of firmly securing your reel. Why 
it's so light you could feel a fish pass 
within an inch of your hook. But 
really, now," (as I laughed at his ex- 
aggeration) "you want a light, pole to 
enjoy the game. You can bend this into 
a half circle and I don't think it will 
break. ' ' 

I stopped him right there. 

Will the joints come apart though, 
I asked. 

With that he put the rod in my hands 
and told me to take it apart. I found 
that considerable resistance was offered 
by the junction of the parts. 

"You'll find that will hold every 
time," the clerk explained. "I have 
heard of instances which may or may 
not have happened but I have never had 
a complaint made to me. You see the 
fish does not pull straight out. When 
your reel is not moving, anything on the 
line will bend your pole just as I do 
now, but there is no tendency to separ- 
ate at the joints. You must not forget 
that your line passes through these loops 
here and there on your rod so that if 
one part did give at a joint you would 
not lose it and you would still have your 
fish, thanks to the reel. This rod is 
handy and we give you a cloth wrap- 
ping for it. There is just as much fun 
to be had out of it as with a ten dollar 
silver mounted rod. It is just as good, 
and you will admit that after you have 
tried it. It is yours for $1.25 and a 
might say that we have had a big run 
on this line during the last month." 

Of course I did not buy the pole, but 
if I need one before this summer wanes 
I know where I will get it and if the 
fish are willing the said $1.25 pole will 
be thoroughly tested. — Curiosity. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



UNIQUE ADAPTATION OF TRADE 
MARK. 

We are indebted to W. H. Wiggs, of 
the Mechanics' Supply Company, Que- 
bec, for the gift of a statuette (as here- 
with illustrated) of their "trade mark." 
This "Small Boy" has been used by 
them for a number of years in their ad- 
vertising matter and makes a very at- 
tractive advertisement. The idea, how- 
ever, of making it into this present 




molded form is unique and the first we 
have seen issued to the trade in Canada. 
The work of preparing this statuette 
was entrusted to a prominent Italian 
sculptor, resident in Toronto, and he has 
been very successful in reproducing the 
features and pose of the young mechan- 
ic. 



mercantile world. Brace up, brother 
hardwaremen, trade off your pie crust 
back-bone for one that will bend but 
never crumble. If unable to procure one 
of this kind that will fit your spinal 
column, dispose of your hardware busi- 
ness at once. Invest a few dollars in 
rat-catching English ferrets and go into 
the rat business, and we feel confident 
you will be financially ahead at the 
year's end than you would be by run- 
ning a hardware business under the 
method advocated in your letter. 
Yours truly, 

J. B. Skelton & Co. 
Palmerston, Ont., July 8, 1911. 



REFLE 



OPPOSED TO RENTING GOODS. 

The Editor of Hardware and Metal : — 

It was with considerable interest and 
amusement I read the article in last 
week's Hardware and Metal, headed 
"Renting instead of Lending." It is a 
conundrum to us how any self-respect- 
ing hardware merchant could condescend 
to cater to a class of customers that 
possessed the amount of cheek it would 
require to ask for the loan of a "Rat 
Trap." Had this particular incident 
happened- in some corner store in the 
wilds of New Ontario it would not have 
appeared so ridiculous to us, but in a 
self-respecting city like Stratford, it is 
beyond belief. 

The sooner hardware merchants stop 

such habits as bur brother in Stratford A by-law will be submitted in Ed- 
is practising, the sooner will depart- monton on July 18 to provide $100,000 
mental stores be a past number in the for paving works. 

49 



ENGLISH EXPLOSIVES FIRM AC- 
QUIRE CANADIAN PLANT. 

Montreal, July 13. — The Northern Ex- 
plosives Co., Ltd., who have gained quite 
a reputation in Canada as manufactur- 
ers of dynamite and blasting explosives, 
have become incorporated with Curtis 's 
& Harvey, Limited, of London, Eng- 
land, one of the oldest manufacturers 
of explosives probably in the world. 
The newly formed company is known as 
Curtis 's & Harvey (Canada) Limited. 

Owing to certain conditions obtaining 
in the explosives situation in Canada, 
the Northern Explosives Co., Ltd., found 
it necessary to strengthen their position 
in order to maintain their place in the 
market. To accomplish this end, their 
interests were linked with the old Eng- 
lish firm above mentioned, the Canadian 
end of the business being known as Cur- 
tis 's & Harvey (Canada) Limited, to 
distinguish it from the English com- 
pany. 

Curtis 's & Harvey, Limited, of Eng- 
land, dates back to the sixteenth cen- 
tury, according to well established re- 
i ports, and it is believed they furnished 
powder for vessels in the time of Ra- 
leigh, Drake and others of that period. 

By expanding the business establish- 
ed by the Northern Explosives Co., the 
new company should succeed. Already 
the plant at Rigaud, Que., is being en- 
larged. New warehouses are being erect- 
ed, and also a new acid house. The 
manufacture of explosives has grown to 
quite a figure in Canada, and there is 
apparently a good future for it. Curtis 's 
& Harvey (Canada) Ltd., manufacture 
dynamite and ordinary blasting explos- 
ives. 

Among the Canadian officers are Lt.- 
Col. Jas. J. Riley Jr., general manager, 
George C. Riley, sales representative, 
and Arthur Hough, superintendent. 




By Mack. 

If I had it to do over again I should 
stick closely to two things, viz., sell for 
cash and mind my own business. 



It is somewhat alarming to listen to 
the different views of my friends and 
old customers regarding the manage- 
ment of my leisur . I have now framed 
a variety of answers to the "How do 
you put in the time" query. 



How much there is to interest the 
mind, every day and these summer 
nights, in nature? But how many hard- 
ware men ever thought about the stars 
and of what are they made, if during 
the morning their salesmanship failed to 
close a stove sale with a farmer whose 
final decision was made in favor of a 
steel range sold from a wagon? 



There is only left to the young pro- 
prietor of a hardware business one way 
to success. The answer is have no other 
interest but hardware first and last. 



If I could unite the energy of my 
first year in the retail hardware venture 
with to-day's experience it seems to my 



mind 
mer. 



I should never have lost a custo- 
I would be a trouble taker. 



Thomas 
with a 



COMPANY ENLARGING. 

Letters patent of corporation have 
been issued in Ottawa to the 
Davidson Manufacturing Co., 
capital stock of $5,000,000. 

James Davidson explains that while 
the capital stock of the company has 
been increased, there will be no change 
in the personnel or policy of the present 
Thomas Davidson Manufacturing Co. 
The new patent of incorporation was ap- 
plied for, in order that the increasing 
business of the firm in Toronto, Winni- 
peg and British Columbia may be more 
easily handled. Steps are being taken 
to provide for the operation of the new 
branches referred to. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



News and Methods of Canadian Hardwaremen 

Aylmer Dealers Selling Gas Ranges — A "Keep Cool" Window 
Made a Hit — Selling Ice Cream Freezers to Summer Resort- 
ers— Unusual Binder Twine Display. 



BOOM IN GAS RANGES. 

Aylmer, Ont. — After several months 
of anxious expectation, Aylmer citizens 
are now being supplied with natural 
gas. Of course, this will mean a boom 
in gas fixtures and appliances, and es- 
pecially in gas stoves. 

The last issue of the local weekly con- 
tained important advertisements from 
the hardware stores of the town, boost- 
ing gas ranges and heaters. J. Y. 
Smiley announced that ladies were es- 
pecially invited to visit his store, and 
he added the request: "Bring your hus- 
bands." Wright & Allen called special 
attention to the particular make of gas 
ranges they are handling, stating that 
they could instal suitable burners in 
cooking stoves, ranges or heaters. 

In addition to the hardware stores, the 
gas company and a local gasfitter also 
advertised, so that in one issue of the 
paper there were no less than four ad- 
vertisements for gas installations. 



AN INTERESTING WINDOW. 

Montreal, July 14.— R. & W. Kerr, St. 
Catherine St., had a seasonable display 
last week. It was a showing of goods 
now in demand and while more than one 
class was represented still there was no 
conglemeration. Several Montreal-made 
ice cream freezers had a place in the 
background while another separated into 
its parts demonstrated with the help of 
a card the principle of its action. At 
one side was a showing of electric toast- 
ers and water heaters by the use of 
which breakfast or lunch may be pre- 
pared without a fire. In another section 
there was a display of lemon squeezers, 
soda siphons, etc., and in the centre a 
new kind of cherry-stoners with a num- 
ber of cherries used to illustrate the 
manner in which the contrivance is used. 
On the whole it was an interesting win- 
dow and attracted considerable atten- 
tion. 



MAKING FREE SAMPLES PAY. 

Beaverton, Ont. — Some two or three 
weeks ago W. Glassford & Co., of this 
town, advertised that, to each of the 
first hundred ladies who called at the 
store Monday morning, they would give 
a sample can of Jap-a-lac. 

"How did it work out?" asked Hard- 
ware and Metal. 

"In my opinion," answered Mr. 
Glassford, it was a success. So far as 
the paint goes, I disposed of all my 
samples, besides selling a quantity of 
the goods on the day referred to in the 



advertisement. More than that, many 
people who received samples have been 
back after larger tins to finsh up work 
they had started. This has increased 
my sale of Jap-a-lac, and shows that 
in my case at least, it paid to give away 
the samples." 



SELLING OIL STOVES. 

Calgary, Alta. — The Corner Hardware 
Co. are making an effort to clear out 
their stock of oil and gasoline stoves be- 
fore the season for these goods has 
passed. They are offering one burner 
gasoline stoves, which formerly sold at 
$4.00 for $3.60. In addition, some stoves 
which had been used through demon- 
strations^ were offered at half price. 
Stoves, formerly priced at $7.00 sold 
for $3.50. Two burner oil stoves on 
legs were offered at reduced prices. 

The company have also cleared out 
their stock of metal window screens at 
reduced prices. 

The sales have been well advertised, 
liberal space having been used in the 
local papers. 



DISTRIBUTED MATS. 

Oxford, N.S.-Wm. Dunsmore & Son 
are presenting their customers with a 
serviceable article in the shape of an as- 
bestos teapot mat. These souvenirs 
have been liberally distributed. 



KEEP COOL WINDOW. 

Toronto.— The hot weather of the past 
fortnight suggested to Aikenhead Hard- 
wareware, Ltd., the idea of featuring 
bathroom accessories, of which they 
carry a complete stock. One of 
the store windows, accordingly, 
was used to display a collection 
of bath sprays, seats, towel racks 
and rolls, glass holders, etc. A large 
sign in the centre read : "Buy a bath 
spray and KEEP COOL." From the 
hot, dusty street, the articles in the 
window carried with them a suggestion 
of comfort and it is reported that a 
large number of sales were made. The 
bath sprays were particularly in de- 
mand. 

ARGUMENTS FOR SELLING ICE 
CREAM FREEZERS. 
St. John, N.B. — The fact that a large 
number of people who reside for the re- 
mainder of the time in the city, go to the 
country districts for three or four 
months in summer, is responsible for the 
featuring here of ice cream freezers and 

50 



refrigerators. ' ' In advertising and fea- 
turing the former," said a local dealer 
this week, "I appeal directly to the 
tastes of people because I know that the 
great majority are fond of ice cream. 
It is difficult, too, to procure it in the 
suburban districts, and because of this, 
strengthened by the plea of 'satisfaction 
in knowing that health-purity is in the 
cream manufactured at home,' the sales 
are made somewhat easier. I make a 
strong appeal on this ground, particu- 
larly, using the argument that in home- 
made ice cream there is less possibility 
of impurity than in the cream purchased 
in stores. I think the sale of ice cream 
freezers and refrigerators this spring 
and during the latter part of June and 
the first of July, particularly, has been 
very encouraging. ' ' 



GOOD BINDER TWINE DISPLAY. 

Chatham, Ont. — A somewhat out of 
the ordinary variation of the common 
binder twine window display is shown 
by the Willard Hardware Co., of Cha- 
tham. The main feature is a double 
arch constructed of binder twine balls, 
which stands in the background. Twine, 
oil cans, and other harvesting inciden- 
tals are displayed in the foreground. 

The W. C. Crawford Handle Co. has 
been formed at Tilbury, with $100,000 
capital, the officers being :, president, W. 
C. Crawford, Tilbury ; vice president and 
general manager, R. W. Hees; secretary- 
treasurer, W. W. Jackson; directors, 
Geo. H. Hees and Stephen S. Haas, of 
Toronto. The company anticipated a 
loan from the town to assist in rebuild- 
ing the former handle factory, practic- 
ally doubling its capacity and the num- 
ber of hands employed. 



PRESTON FIRM GETS BIG WEST- 
ERN CONTRACT. 

Preston, Ont. — Bernhardt & Gies, of 
this town, have just been awarded a big 
plumbing and heating contract in Me- 
dicine Hat, Alta. It consists of equip- 
ping with plumbing and heating appar- 
atus an entire block, containing stores, 
offices, etc., together wtih the metal 
work for ceilings and roofing. 

This firm have made a specialty of 
outside contract work, and have done 
several large jobs at different Ontario 
points. The present contract, however, 
is the first one they have ever secured 
outside the province. 

Mr. Gies and staff expect to go to 
Medicine Hat next month, and to be 
absent on this job for about six weeks. 



Mr. Ball, representing Sargent & Co., 
New Haven, Conn., manufacturers of 
tools, called upon the Montreal trade 
this week. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Ontario. 

Machinery is being installed in Welland 
Vale factory to be used in the manufac- 
ture of rakes. 

C. N. Haldenby, Toronto, manager of 
the Sanderson Pearcy Co., has returned 
after a holiday trip. 

The Taylor-Forbes "soccer" team, 
Guelph, defeated the Carpet Mills eleven 
in a city league game. 

D. Hood, of the Marks, Clavet & 
Dobie hardware store, Port Arthur, has 
returned from a trip to Duluth. 

D. W. Budd, Renfrew, is leaving for 
the Pacific Coast in the interests of the 
Barnet Manufacturing Co. He will show 
refrigerators at the fairs through the 
west. 

W. P. Stacey, hardware dealer, Fuller- 
ton Corners, was driving out of Mit- 
chell with a load of binder twine, when 
he was thrown off. His head struck on 
a steel rail, a nasty gash being inflicted. 

The saw works of the Shurly Diet- 
rich Co., Gait, was closed last Satur- 
day for repairs, but the firm were 
forced to re-open on Monday, through 
stress of business. 

A. Sellers. Fort William, landed a 
three and a half pound speckled trout, 
and won the rod and reel , offered by 
Waddington & Buchta, to the person 
bringing home the largest trout prior to 
July I. 

A. N. W. Clare, of Clare Bros. & 
Co., Preston, has returned from a six 
weeks' trip abroad. Mr. Clare spent a 
month in Germany, reaching England 
in time to witness the Coronation pro- 
cession. 

The hardware firm of Devine & Le- 
gree, Renfrew, has been dissolved. 
Matthew Devine, the retiring member, is 
a well-known citizen of Renfrew. Joseph 
Legree, who recently went to Renfrew 
from Calabogie, will continue the busi- 
oess. 

At a special meeting of the Waterloo 
town council, W. G. Weichel, hardware- 
man, and deputy reeve, was appointed 
acting mayor until a successor is elect- 
ed to the late Mayor Graybill. It is 
stated that Mr. Weichel is the likeliest 
man for that position. He has resign- 
ed the chairmanship of the fire and 
light committee. 

Quebec. 

E. B. Ryan, of the sales department 
of Lewis Bros., is spending his holidays 
in Toronto. 

A. Ouimet, of the staff of the Jas. 
Walker Co., Ltd., is spending his holi- 
days at Ste. Rose, Que. 

Thos. Mortimer, representing Jno. 
Raybone & Sons, Toronto, called on the 
Montreal trade this week. 



Gardner & Gardner, tinsmiths, Sher- 
brooke, have dissolved partnership. 
Oruer Gardner is now conducting the 
shop. 

The hardware store of M. Philbin, St. 
Catherine St., Montreal, will be closed 
on Saturday afternoons, during July and 
August, according to an announcement. 

A small fire broke out on Monday 
night in the cellar of the hardware 
store of Joseph Beaucage, Cote des 
Neiges, Montreal. It was easily extin- 
guished. 

F. Ross Newman and Harry Newman, 
of Caverhill, Learmonty & Co., Mon- 
treal, returned from Europe on the 
steamship "Royal Edward." They had 
a most pleasant trip, and report that 
trade conditions across the ocean are 
excellent. 

Geo. Caverhill, of Caverhill, Learmont 
& Co., and chairman of the Board of 
Directors of the R. & O. Navigation 
Co. was one of those who enjoyed the 
maiden trip of the splendid new R. & 
O. steamer "Saguenay" this week. 
Leaving Montreal for the run down the 
Saguenay River a very enjoyable week 
was spent away from the city's heat. 

Western Provinces. 

Clark, Tollock & Co., Watrous, have 
disposed of their hardware department 
to R. M. McLeod of Winnipeg. 

The Brant Store, Brant, Alta., has 
been conducting a "Great Slaughter 
Sale" of hardware, stoves and clothing. 
The sale started on June 24. 

James Allison, of the Fairview Co., 
had his left arm broken. A weak step 
in a ladder, which he was mounting, 
caused his fall. 

The plate glass window in the Mani- 
toba Hardware and Lumber Co., Reston, 
Man., was broken one night last week. 
A hard missile is supposed to have done 
the damage, 

F. H. Agnew, who has for a number 
of years been identified with the James 
Robertson Co., in Winnipeg, was pres- 
ented by members of the staff with a 
case of silver on the occasion of his 
retirement from the service of the com- 
pany. Mr. Agnew began work with the 
James Robertson Company more than 
twenty years ago. He was for a long 
time on the road as traveling sales- 
man for the company, and for the past 
ten vears has been the buyer and the 
sales manager. He is now leaving to take 
an important position with Thomas 
Black, wholesale building materials. 

Maritime Provinces. 

There is a movement on foot at Monc- 
ton, N.B., to secure a half holiday for 
the retail clerks. 

McDonald's Hardware store, Chatham, 
N.B., has been conducting a dinner set 
competition. The coupon drawn was No. 

51 



45 but so far the lucky holder has not 
come forward to claim the set. 

One night recently burglars entered 
the hardware . store of S. A. Crowell & 
Co., Yarmouth, through the skylight in 
the roof. 

The store of Dakin Bros., hardware 
dealers, Digby, N.S., was broken into 
and a box cartridges and a small 
amount of silver taken. Several other 
stores were entered. 

The annual convention of the Maritime 
Board of Trade, will open at Moncton, 
N.B., on Wednesday, Aug. 16th. Mat- 
ters of great importance to the Mar- 
itime Provinces will be taken up at this 
convention, and it is expected that there 
will be a very large attendance of busi- 
ness men from every part of the prov- 
inces by the sea. 



VETERAN HARDWAREMAN RE- 
TIRES. 

The store of James Munro, hardware 
merchant of Chilliwack, B.C., has been 
sold to Burton Bros., of Langdenburg, 
Sask. The new proprietors took pos- 
session on July 1, and the store was 
closed for a short time for stock-taking. 

The business is one of the oldest in 
that section of the city. James Munro 
started there twenty-one years ago on 
a very modest scale. He opened first 
in the tinning and repair business. Step 
by step the business grew, and gradually 
new lines were added. The stock in- 
creased until a complete assortment of 
hardware was carried. At the present 
time a $30,000 stock is carried and the 
business is one of the largest and most 
flourishing in Chilliwack. 

Mr. Munro is retiring from business 
and does not intend to engage in any line. 
He has other financial interests to en- 
gage his attention and, as he is Mayor 
of Chilliwack, the duties of that office 
will also take up considerable of his 
time. 

Burton Bros, are moving to Chilli- 
wack, and are taking some friends with 
them. They are aggressive hardware- 
men, and will continue the business 
along progressive lines. 



NOTICE TO SUBSCRIBERS. 

The Subscription Dept. have re- 
cently received a number of com- 
plaints from subscribers, stating 
that their papers are late in ar- 
riving. As we are most anxious 
that our readers should receive 
their papers promptly, we earn- 
estly request ALL SUBSCRIB- 
ERS CHANGING THEIR AD- 
DRESS to notify the office 
promptly. When it is necessary 
for the Post office to re-address 
papers considerable time is lost. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN METAL MARKETS 

See Itemized Market Quotation! on Page 60. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 14.— The metal mar- 
kets have been rather quiet during the 
w eek. The weather has possibly had some 
effect, and anyway it receives a certain 
amount of blame. But there is a fair 
business passing locally, and certainly 
no complaints are heard. The conditions 
of the markets show but little variation. 
Tin is still very firm, and from the indi- 
cations it is likely to be maintained in 
its present position, if not higher, for 
some time to come. Copper is steady, 
and apparently is reaching a better busi- 
ness basis. Spelter is being used up freely, 
but owing to its price, consumers have 
been buying practically from hand to 
mouth. There is nothing specially new 
in the pig iron situation, and the mar- 
kets as a whole are quiet but in a 
healthy condition, as far as local con- 
ditions are concerned. 

Pig Iron. — Conditions in pig iron are 
much the same as when last referred 
to. In the United States during June 
the production of pig iron showed a de- 
crease while steel manufacturers had 
an increase in their output. Canadian 
conditions; continue satisfactory. The 
extremely warm weather interfered to 
a certain extent of late but on the 
whole the home business is doing nicely. 
Prices are unchanged from last week. 

Tin. — While it has been claimed that 
there are indications of the syndicate 
loosing its grasp of the tin situation, 
those in close touch feel that they still 
have control and will continue to main- 
tain it for some time to come. Locally 
there is nothing new in this market. 

Copper. — The copper market has been 
growing in strength and it is thought 
that it is being brought gradually to a 
better business basis. Whether this is 
an actual fact or not is something of a 
question, but there has been a better 
feeling in this market of late, and it is 
mentioned as being quite strong. 

Lead. — With improved conditions in 
the home lead market as far as produc- 
tion is concerned, there will likely be 
a curtailment of imported metal and 
trade will resume its former channel. 
The market is steady. 

Spelter. — Demand for spelter has been 
steady, but it has been merely for ne- 
cessary requirements, the local consum- 
erse apparently buying from hand to 
mouth. The price is unchanged. 

Antimony. — There is nothing new in 
regard to this metal, the market show- 
ing no change. 

Old Materials. — Business is steady 
and demand is maintained. Prices are 
as follows: — Heavy copper and wire, 
lie; heavy red brass, 10c; heavy lead, 



2%c; light copper and bottoms, 9c; tea 
lead, 2iy 2 e; machinery cast iron, No. 1, 
$14.50; No. 1 wrought iron, $12.50; mal- 
leable, No. 1, $9 ; miscellaneous steel, $5 ; 
stove plate, $12.50. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 14, 1911.— It should oc- 
casion no surprise to learn that trade in 
metals is quiet, this week. Most of the 
metal merchants here are very busy, 
but this is largely because the vacation 
season is on, rather than that there is 
any special rush of orders. Those who 
remain on duty are dividing up the 
work of absentees, and they find that 
there is more than enough to go around. 

The tendency is toward a steadiness 
of prices, and there are no changes to 
report this week. Considerable satisfac- 
tion is expressed, among local metal 
men, that the iron and steel situation in 
the United States continues to show im- 
provement. Unfilled orders on hand at 
the end of June, were much larger than 
had been expected, and the steel firms 
are experiencing the unusual sensation 
of a steady improvement in 
business during what is normally the 
dullest month in the year. This situa- 
tion cannot but reflect favorably upon 
the Canadian market. 

Tin.— The situation in this market is 
still in the hands of tbe English syn- 
dicate, who show no disposition to re- 
lease their control. Prices are main- 
tained at the same high level as at our 
last report, and the chances are that 
they will do so for an indefinite time. 
Stocks in the hands of Toronto people 
are very light. 

Antimony.— There is an improvement 
in the demand and a better trade is be- 
ing done than for some time past. 
Prices are unchanged. 

Copper.— The expectation of a revival 
in U.S. consumption of copper has not 
been realized, but the financial interests 
behind the copper market are so strong 
that no downward tendency in prices is 
to be feared. Consumers are buying 
supplies for only a short time in ad- 
vance so that, although local merchants 
are doing a nice trade, there is nothing 
spectacular about the market. The 
same prices are being quoted as last 
week. 

Plates and Sheets.— Very good book- 
ings are reported for import, but ship- 
ments from stock are light. 

Pig Iron. — Last week's condition still 
prevails to a large extent although, with 
the return of cooler weather, the foun- 
dries are especially busy, some of them 
having already booked orders for as 
52 



many stoves as they can turn out before 
the opening of the season. Prices still 
rule as follows : Canadian Foundry No. 
1, $19 and No. 2, 50 cents a ton less. 
Old Country iron is quoted at $19.50 for 
Middlesboro' No. 3 ; and $20.25 for Clar- 
ence No. 3 ; Summerlee No. 2 is $22, 
and Cleveland Eo. 1, $20.50. Jarrow 
and Glengarnock irons are at $20 and 
$22 respectively. 

Lead.— There is a splendid demand, as 
consumers all have only light stocks on 
hand. Prices remain steady. 

Spelter.— The situation is unchanged 
and business continues on a very satis- 
factory basis. 

Old Metals.— We are still quoting : 
Heavy copper and wire, 10^c to lie ; 
heavy red brass, 7£c ; heavy lead, $2.90; 
light copper and bottoms, 9Jc ; tea lead, 
$2.40 ; machinery cast iron, No. 1, $14 ; 
No. 1 wrought, $10 ; malleable No. 1 $8 
to $10 ; miscellaneous steel, $6 to $7 ; 
stove plate, $12.50. 



INCREASED BOOKINGS OF STEEL 
TN U. S. 

Cleveland, O., July 13.— The Iron 
Trade Review to-day says:— Activity in 
the iron trade has extended to to the 
pig iron market, and inquiries for basic 
are heavier than at any time in more 
than 18 months, between 60,000 and 
75,000 tons being under active negotia- 
tion. Heavy tonnage of basic has 
changed hands recently at very low 
prices. Some of the larger consumers of 
foundry grades, including the Westing- 
house Electric & Mfg. Co., are negoti- 
ating for their forward requirements. 

New business and specifications against 
contracts for finishing materials showed 
further improvements during the first 10 
days of July, despite the fact that this 
is regarded as one of the dullest 
months of the year for the steel indus- 
try. One large company reports that 
actual bookings last week exceeded ship- 
ments by several thousand tons. On ac- 
count of the increased bookings, the 
usual mid-summer idleness of finished 
mills was of short duration, most of 
the mills which closed down June 30 
having resumed operation. The feeling 
is now pretty general that there will be 
a gradual increase in buying in all 
lines and that the industry will make 
an excellent showing during the third 
quarter, as compared with the first and 
second quarters of this year. 



The death took place at Alexandria 
Bay, N. Y., on Thursday, of Maria 
Phelp, wife of William Vallance, of 
Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton. The 
funeral, which is private, is being held 
to-day (Saturday) from the family resi- 
dence, 42 Herkimer street, Hamilton, to 
Hamilton cemetery. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 14. — The continued 
hot spell has helped some lines of busi- 
ness extensively. In some respects also 
it has curtailed business. It has been 
said that here and there travelers found 
retailers who were indisposed to talk 
business. "Call again when I feel more 
like talking and doing business," it was 
said more than once. There is no doubt 
that the weather cut down the total 
amount of business, but the new lines 
or the seasonable goods that were boom- 
ed by the heat wave kept business at 
quite a figure. The houses are all pretty 
busy. The holiday spirit is more pre- 
valent than usual, which is to be expect- 
ed, as some are getting away now, and 
others are eagerly looking forward to 
their time of departure. 

Lawn and Garden Tools. — A fair de- 
mand is still felt for lawn and garden 
tools. The heat made a difference in 
this department, especially in sprinklers, 
hose and such accessories.. 

Discounts in garden hose range from 
50 per cent, off to 70 and 10 and 10, 
according to quality. We quote hose 
clamp, V2 to %-in., 25c a doz. ; hose 
couplings, y 2 to 3 /4-in., $1 a doz.; hose 
sprinklers, ring patterns, $5.75 a doz.; 
revolving pattern, 12-in., $13 a doz.; 24- 
in., $34 a doz., and 36-in., at $39 a doz.; 
hose nozzles, Gem, $3.50 a doz.; reels, 
75c each and upwards. The discount 
offered is 50 and 50 per cent. 

Seasonable Lines.- — This was one of 
the busy departments during the past 
weeks. Orders for screen doors, re- 
frigerators, ice cream freezers, fans and 
such goods, were numerous, and in not 
a few instances stock was exhausted. 
Harvest Tools. — There is certainly a 
good trade passing in this branch of 
the business. Hay forks, scythes, potato 
forks, etc., are all selling well. The 
harvest season is fast approaching, and 
preparation where it is necessary should 
not be further delayed. 

Hay forks, manure forks, straw forks, 
barley forks, spading forks, potato forks, 
field and garden hoes, Dutch weeding 
hoes, garden rakes, 50 and 5 p.c. ; hay 
rakes, $1.15 to $2.75 a doz.; scythes, $6 
to $8 a doz.; sickles, $1.85 to $2.25 a 
doz.; grass hooks, $1.65 to $2.10 a doz.; 
snaths, 40 p.c. discount. 

Household Utensils. — Articles for use 
during preserving time are now in de- 
mand. Graniteware is particularly ask- 
ed for in the form of kettles of various 
styles. Preserving jars are also good 
sellers. Retailers are making many dis- 
plays of these goods just now. 

Some of the prices quoted are : Food 
choppers, from $9 to $15 a doz; ice 
cream freezers, 1-qt, $1.50; 2-qt., $1.65; 



3-qt., $2.05; 4-qt., $2.50; 6-qt., $3.15; 
8-qt., $4; coffee percolators, $1.75 to 
$3.50; washing machines from $3.50 up; 
wringers, Royal Canadian, $47.75 per 
doz. ; Universal, $37.75 per doz. ; Safety, 
$56.25 less 20 per cent, per doz. ; Mrs. 
Potts' irons, plain, 82y 2 c per set; nickel- 
plated, 871/20 per set; common sad irons, 
4 to 7 lbs., $5 per cwt. 

Sporting Goods.— There is a well 
maintained demand for practically all 
lines of sporting goods. Repeat orders 
are coming ii nicely, and the total vol- 
ume of business is good. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 13. — Business continues 
brisk and even. The extreme weather 
has not had any appreciable effect. 
While it has curtailed trade a trifle in 
some directions, the loss has been more 
than made up for by the extra demand 
for some lines created as a result of the 
warmth. 

The jobbing houses agree that so far 
this summer, business has been highly 
satisfactory. It has been well sustained 
and many lines show a distinct advance 
over last year. Some goods have seen 
phenomenal sales and in not a few cases 
shortages have occurred as a result of 
the increased demand. 

Seasonable Goods. — Screen doors have 
continued in demand, although they are, 
by this time, somewhat out of season. 
The warm weather created more busi- 
ness in such lines than is usually felt at 
this time. Wire netting, hose and sprink- 
lers also sold well this week though 
orders received were in all cases small. 
Retailers are ordering only to fill actu- 
al demands. There is still some call for 
refrigerators but, in the smaller grades, 
there is no stock in sight to satisfy the 
demand. "We have a supply coming 
about the first of September," said one 
jobber. "A good part of it is already 
spoken for. We received one order to- 
day for eleven to be delivered in Sep- 
tember." This late demand is for new 
houses; in fact, a brisk business is 
usually done in refrigerators during the 
fall season. Ice cream freezers have 
been in steady demand. 

Household Goods. — There has been a 
heavy call for all grades of enamelware. 
Preserving kettles are still selling brisk- 
ly. A local house reports the sale to- 
day of a very heavy consignment of 
tubs. "We have been selling about a 
carload of tubs a week," it was stated. 
"The demand has been unusually 
heavy." Woodenware of all kinds has 
been steadily moving since the summer 
season set in. 

53 



Harvest Tools. — Large orders are now 
being placed for harvest tools. Stock- 
ing orders are being placed in most 
cases, but some sorting-up demands 
have already been received, showing that 
the retail trade has opened briskly. 
Scythes, hay forks, field and garden hoes, 
rakes, sickles, etc., are all selling well. 

Builders' Hardware.— It is reported 
that the difficulty in obtaining bricks 
felt earlier in the season is still experi- 
enced to some degree and building oper- 
ations as a result have been somewhat 
retarded. There is, nevertheless, a 
healthy call for all varieties of builders' 
hardware. The demand from the city 
has been particularly heavy. It is be- 
lieved that the volume of business done 
so far has been in excess of that done 
during the corresponding period last 
year. 

Heavy Hardware. — All lines are brisk 
and firm. Bolts, nuts, screws, rivets, 
nails, etc., are all showing healthy activ- 
ity, the demand being now large and 
well sustained. Present quotations are : 
Discounts on carriage bolts, % and less, 
60 and 10 and 10; coach screws, 75; 
stove bolts, 80 and 7~y&. 

Stoves and Heating Goods. — A signifi- 
cant statement was made by a local 
stove manufacturer to-day. "Enough 
orders are placed now to insure a 
healthy fall trade in stoves," he said. 
"The growth of the trade in the West 
is taking up all surplus production — 
and a little more." Others report to 
like effect. Orders have been placed in 
sufficient bulk to insure the sale of the 
complete output of the manufacturers. 
Few orders, of course, are being re- 
ceived for immediate delivery, the great 
bulk being for shipment in late summer 
There is still a good demand for oil 
and gasoline stoves, and furnaces are 
now in demand in all sections. 

Sporting Goods. — Business is still 
active. Summer goods are selling and 
enquiries are starting to arrive for 
rifles, ammunition and hunters' sup- 
plies. Canoes and other aquatic goods 
are in brisk demand. 



OFFERED NOMINATION. 

T. S. Hobbs, of the Hobbs Hardware 
Co., London, has been offered the Liberal 
nomination for the Dominion seat for 
London in the next election. 



F. Orr Lewis, of Lewis Bros., was ex- 
pected home from Europe on Friday of 
this week. 

A. A. Bittues, general manager of the 
Gillette Safety Razor Co., of Canada, is 
in Rochester this week attending the an- 
nual sessions of the Imperial Council of 
the Mystic Shrine. 



HARDWARE AND METAI 



The Western Hardware Market Situation 

Travelers Off Their Territories for Period of Fairs — Business 
Accordingly Somewhat Lighter — Some Price Changes Noted. 



Winnipeg, July— Trade in all lines 
is easier this week owing to the return 
to "the city of practically all the trav- 
elers of the leading firms for the an- 
nual exhibition, now known as the 
Canadian Industrial Exhibition. The 
arrival of the "Knights of the Grip" 
in the city will of course have an ef- 
fect on the volume of trade transacted 
for the next two weeks, as distances 
are so great in the west that it is 
hardly worth while returning 1 500 or 600 
miles for a few days only. All that 
have arrived so far speak very encour- 
agingly of the condition of the country 
both as regards the growing crop, 
which is fast reaching maturity owing 
to the recent warm weather, and as to 
the hardware and metal trade in gen- 
eral. A good crop this fall will bring 
about a general clearing off of many 
back debts ; and increased hope to the 
small retailer. 

Harvesting materials have been by 
far the most active during the week, a 
sharp drop having taken place in the 
orders for general summer lines and 
summer sporting goods. One firm stat- 
ed to-day that as far as they were 
concerned, these were over. Orders for 
fall sporting lines such as guns, rifles 
and ammunition are arriving and these 
lines are moving steadily. 

Several new quotations will be notic- 
ed this week both up and down. 

Winnipeg Hardware Quotations. 

Axe Handles— Oval and octagon, i.g. 
Hickory, $3.50; No. 1, $2.00 ; i, $1.60 ; 
p.g. oak, $2.75. . 

Auger Bits— "Irwin" bits, 474 ; other 
lines 70 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts— Carriage, f and smaller, 65 ; 
7-16 and larger, 55 ; machine, | and 
under, 60 and 5 ; 7-16 and over, 55 ; ma- 
chine set screws, 65 ; plough bolts, 50 ; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, 8 ; 
small lots, 2£ ; stove bolts 77±. 

Bar Iron— Bar Iron, $2.50 ; Swedish 
iron, $4.25; sleigh shoe steel, $2.65; 
spring steel, $3.40 ; machinery steel, 
$3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 
lbs. $8.50 ; Jessop, $15 

Blocks— Steel, 50 per cent; wood, 60 
per cent. 

Cut Nails.— $3.15 per keg base. 

Copper— Planished copper, 30c per 
lb.; tinned, 24c. 

Crowbars — 4$c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc.— 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $4.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3.24. 

Canada Plates.— Firm. Half polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $3.65; 8-inch, $3.90; full 
polish, 6 and 7-inch, $4.40; 8-inch, $4.65. 

devices — 74c per lb. 

Enamelware— Canada, 50; Imperial, 
CO; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60 ; white 



70 and 5 ; diamond, 50 ; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files— American, 75 ; Black Diamond, 
60 ; Nicholson's, 65 per cent. 

Galvanized Iron.— Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18, $3.85; 20, $3.90; 22 and 24 
$4; 26, $4.20; 28, $4.60; 30 gauge or 
103^ oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Iron Pipe.— f in., $3.50 ; | 
in., $4; | in., $5.20; 1 in., $7.50; 1* 
in., $10.25; 1* in., $12.45; 2 in., $16.25. 

Galvanized Ware — Pails, 40 and 5 
p.c. Other galvanized lines, 37*4 p.c. 

Grindstones— Per 100 lbs., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron, No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2, and 
larger, $4.65; snowshoes, No. to No. 
1, $5.15; No. 2 and larger, $4.90; steel, 
No. to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, 
$5.10; featherweight, $6.50. 

Horse Nails — "M.R.M. " cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 5, $2.75; 6 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.85; 9, $2.75; 10, 
11 and 12, $2.65 in 25-lb. boxes. 

Harvest Tools — 50, 5 and 5 p.c. 

Hinges — Light T and strap, 65 p.c. 

Hooks — Brush, heavy, per dozen, 
$8.75; grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers — Full box, 40 p.c. ; 
smaller lots, 35 p.c. 

Iron Pipe, Black— i in., $3 ; i in., $2.- 
45 ; | in., $2.50 ; i in., $3.25 ; f in., 
$4 ; 1 in., $5.65 ; 1* in., $7.75 ; 1£ in., 
$9.25 ; 2 in., $12 ; Z\ in., $19.60 ; 3 in., 
$25.75 ; 3i in., $33.50 ; 4 in., $38.35 ; 4* 
in., $44.10 ; 5 in., $50.40 ; 6 in., $65.10 ; 
7 in., $95.50 ; 8 in., $118. 

Logging Chain— i in., $7.50 ; 5-16 in., 
$6 ; i in., $5.50. 

Lanterns — Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $9. 

Poultry netting — 57^ per cent. 

Pig Lead— $4.75. Lead Pipe— .$5.25. 

Rivets and Burrs — Iron rivets, 55 per 
cent.; copper, No. 8, 30c; 10, 32c; 12, 
34c; copper burrs, No. 8, 40c ; 13, 43c; 
12, 46c; copper rivets and burrs, No. 8, 
31c ; 9, 32c ; 10, 33c ; coppered, No. 8, 
17c; 9, 17Jc; 10, 18c. 

Rope — Sisal, 8c; pure manila, 10fc ; 
British manila, 8Jc; lath yarn, 9c. 

Sheet Zinc — Casks, $8.25; broken 
lots, $8.75. 

Steel Squares — 40 off new list. 

Shovels — Discounts on No. 1, No. 2, 
60 and 2$ p.c; No. 3, No. 4, 50 and 
2| p.c; No. 1 scoops 50 and 6 p.c; all 
other grades, 45 and 5 p.c; fifty cents 
per dozen net is added to equalize east- 
ern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $26 per cw.t. 

Screws— Flat head iron, 80, 10, 10 
and 10; brass, 75; round head, iron, 
80 ; brass, 70 ; coach, 65 per cent. 

Stove Pipes— 25 and 2£ p.c. 

Terne Plate— 1. C, $9.75; I. X., 
$11.75. 

Tin Plate— I. C, charcoal, 20 x 28, 
full box, $10.25; i box, $5.50; I. X., full 
box, $12.25; i box, $6.50; I. X. X., full 
54 



box, $14.25; * box, $7.50; 20 x 39, I. C, 
full box, $13.f*0; i box, $8; I. X., full 
box, $15.50; i box, $9. 

Tinware, Etc.— Pressed, retinned and 
plain, 75 and 2J; pieced, 25; japanned 
ware, 35. 

Wire.— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.05 ; 
plain twist, $3.40 ; staples, $3 ; an- 
nealed wire, base, $3; oiled, 10c extra ; 
bright iron $3.20 base; brass spring wire, 
base, 23c; plain galvanized iron, Nos. 
6, 7 and 8, $3.50; No. 9, $2.90; 10, 
$3.60; No. 11, $3.70; No. 12, $3.10; No. 
13, $3.40; No. 14, $4.25. 

Wire Nails— $2.90 Winnipeg, and $2.45 
Fort William. 

Wringers — Royal Canadian, $39.25; 
New Easy, $42.50. 

Paints and Oils. 

With the prospects of a good crop 
becoming brighter every day, the lin- 
seed oil market has at last taken an- 
other decline. A drop of 5c per gal., 
both raw and boiled, is reported this 
week. Stocks are of fair size and un- 
less anything turns up to hurt the new 
crop a declining market is looked for. 
Present prices are $1.15 per 9 fts. for 
raw, and $1.18 per 9 Its. for boiled. 

Turpentine is still steady and the 
demand firm at 8jvc. per gal. in barrels 
and 95c in small lots. 

Petroleum and Gasolene.— Silver Star, 
in bbls., per gal., 15c; Sunlight, 18c ; 
Family Safety, 22*c; Searchlight, 20$c; 
Red Rose, 23£c; Keystone Special, 18c; 
Pemoline, in bulk, 19c; Silverlight, in 
bulk, 15c; Acme lamp, in bulk, 27c; 
White Rock, in bulk, 22£c ; National 
Light, in bulk, 21c; Engine Gasolene, 
24c; White Lily, 26c; Royal, 24c 



PETITION AGAINST EARLY 
CLOSING LAW. 

St. John, N.B. — There is still no settle- 
ment of the matter of the early closing 
by-law recently enacted by the Com- 
mon Council. A meeting of the latter 
body was held this week, and a dele- 
gation of merchants appeared before 
them asking for a hearing in protest of 
the law, but were told to come back next 
week when a special meeting will be 
held to consider the matter. Meanwhile, 
there are a number of decisions pending 
in the police court where reports have 
been made against certain dealers for 
not complying with the law compelling 
them to close at 7 o'clock. A petition 
is to be presented at next week's meet- 
ing, signed by 400 citizens, many of them 
merchants, protesting against the enact- 
ment. 

An organization meeting of the "Can- 
ada Nail and Wire Co." was held this 
week when the following were elected 
directors: E. C, Elkin, S. E. Elkin, and 
J. R. Johnson. S. E. Elkin was chosen 
president, E. C. Elkin, vice-president, 
G. N. Johnson, secretary, and C. Nixon, 
treasurer. 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Relation of Paints to House Furnishing 

Building Up Paint Department by Featuring Allied Lines — 
Wall Paper and Glass Have Helped Sell Paints — Experience 
Of One Successful Hardwareman. 



Evidence is certainly not wanting to 
show that the hardware dealer who de- 
sires to build up his paint department 
should not depend upon it alone. This 
does not mean that any other lines are 
necessary, but to acquire the greatest 
measure of success it seems advisable to 
carry several allied lines. 

A representative of Hardware and Me- 
tal had this point demonstrated to him 
recently on a visit to the store of F. 
Martineau, St. Catherine St. East, 
Montreal. 

Paint, Wall Paper and Glass. 

Upon entering this store there are 
three departments practically within 
easy access of each other., One is the 
paint department, near it is glass and 
across the double store is a wall paper 
department. It has been stated in these 
columns many times that these three 
lines are closely related and the hard- 
ware men themselves are aware of this 
fact. Joseph Martineau, the buyer for 
this firm and the son of the late pro- 
prietor, stated that the three lines went 
well together. It often happens, he re- 
marked, that the painter is also a paper 
hanger, and does whitewashing, and also 
looks after the glazing of windows. In 
other cases the work is more divided 
but at any rate there is a correlation of 
these trades that makes it worth while 
to the hardware dealer to cater to the 
wants of these tradesmen. 

The Paint Department. 

Speaking of the paint business alone, 
Mr. Martineau said that their policy 
was to carry only one manufacturer's 
brands. They did not adhere absolutely 
to this principle for they carried two 
prominent lines and found that it was 
easier to sell paint in this way. This 
spring, trade was very good and even 
yet there is a fair demand with the au- 
tumn and fall coming along to create 
another demand. 

Getting the Painters. 

One method followed, is to depend 
upon the painters who deal with this 
store. This proved specially desirable 
when wall paper is carried. The con- 
tracts secured by the painter will be 
filled at the store. It is well known 



that the painter gets a contract in the 
most cases for painting and papering and 
also for whatever graining and staining 
there is to be done. It will be seen 
therefore that a goodly number of paint- 
ers leaving their trade with a particular 
store is certainly a decided asset. Of 
course there is the extensive trade that 
does not come through the painters, but 
the other forms a solid basis upon which 
to build up the whole demand. 

Where Wall Paper Comes In. 

Mr. Martineau in referring to the wall 
paper department stated that they car- 
ried paper which ranged widely both in 
price and quality. It was not difficult 
to handle, once the business was under- 
stood and there certainly were several 
seasons, he stated, when the demand is 
heavy. The methods of shelving and dis- 
playing, and the talking points about 
wall paper are soon acquired by the 
bright salesman. But the main point 
brought out is that of carrying the 
goods which sell together. The dry- 
goods man sells collars as well as shirts 
for they both combine to decorate .the 
individual. On the same principle is it 
anything more than what might be ex- 
pected to have paint and paper in the 
one store ? They combine to decorate 
the house. It is not only logical but it 
has been proved to be practical and pro- 
fitable. 

As to Glass. 

Glass is natural to the trade and is 
extensively carried. It likewise fits in 
with paint and wall paper. In the Mar- 
tineau store the compartments for the 
different sizes in the glass department 
are numerous and well arranged. There 
are many reasons for urging or at least 
for impressing upon the trade the fact 
that one article helps to sell any other 
that is closely allied to it. There are 
more examples to prove this idea than 
that of paint, oils, wall paper and glass. 
But more of that anon. 

Graniteware Considered. 

Passing from the paint department to 
where wall paper is sold in the Mar- 
tineau store, one passes the granite- 
ware section. Mr. Martineau realizes 
the value of both wall paper and 
graniteware ad attractions to women, 

55 



and hence they are given some pro- 
minence. 

"We carry only the first quality 
graniteware," Mr. Martineau remarked. 
"We do find customers who tell us ablout 
the goods they can buy in the depart- 
ment stores for less money, but when 
we point out to them the difference in 
quality the most of them follow our ad- 
vice and leave the cheaper goods where 
they belong. I have told those who 
speak so, that we could carry a second 
aod even third quality but we were look- 
ing after the interests of our customers 
and did not feel that they would wel- 
come into their homes graniteware of 
this kind. Talk like this will generally 
win them around. Besides if you carry 
the goods of a reputable house and the 
woman remembers it she will want to 
buy more of that kind of goods and it 
is easier to sell." 

House Furnishing. 

Mr. Martineau mentioned the desir- 
ability of having many women custom- 
ers., There are so many articles of a 
household nature carried in the average 
hardware store that women must be a 
large percentage of the visitors. Gra- 
niteware is one department in itself. 
Then there are carpet sweepers, washing 
machines and wringers, electric irons, 
stoves and so on down a long list. This 
trade in household goods should not be 
overlooked. It is readily appreciated 
that wall paper, paints and brushes may 
be considered under this heading and the 
manner in which one department may be 
made to help another is quite an im- 
portant consideration. 



TAKE POSSESSION IN SEPTEMBER. 

Lowe Bros. Company, who, as recent- 
ly announced, are to become a factor in 
the Canadian paint trade, are preparing 
to formally enter the field in September. 

A Hardware and Metal representative 
who called at the company's head office 
in Dayton, Ohio, was informed that this 
was the date set for them to take pos- 
session of their Canadian business. It 
will be necessary for them to erect a 
new plant, which is expected to be ready 
by November. 

Definite announcement of the exact site 
of the plant has not yet been made, al- 
though it will be located in Toronto. 
Several sites are under consideration, 
and the negotiations which are now be- 
ing carried on, are likely to be consum- 
mated in the near future. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



How One Dealer Improved Paint Demand 

Managed to Convince His Customers That the Price of Paint 
Was Reasonable— Window Displays Have Kept the Demand 
Steady Right up to the Present. 



"The paint business has been good and 
brisk," declared a retail dealer the other 
day, "'but early in the season, it did not 
promise very well." 

"You see," he continued, "most peo- 
ple thought that prepared paints were 
high in the spring and I for one found 
it hard to sell at first. Some held off 
from buying, expecting to see a slump 
in the price. Others decided to buy lin- 
seed oil and turpentine and make their 
own paint. They did not keep that up 
very long, however. 

"One painter bought a supply from me 
early in the spring. He was staggered 
at the price of oil and turps but he went 
ahead anyway. A week afterward he 
came back and told me that he had fig- 
ured it out and had found that it was 
cheaper to buy the paint ready mixed. 
He has been doing so ever since. 

"This gave me an idea and I arrang- 
ed a window display, showing a can of 
ready mixed and a card with the price 
attached. Next to that, I placed a can 
of paint which I had mixed myself and 
over it placed a card with the price of 
the ingredients marked upon it. This 
was at the time that turpentine and oil 
were both breaking the altitude record 
and consequently the figures on the two 
cards were highly favorable to the ready 
mixed variety. This comparison had the 
desired effect for many men who had 
previously refused to buy the prepared 
paints, came around and bought a sup- 



ply. Business has been moving along in 
nice volume ever since." 

"How about those who refused to buy 
in the hope of lower prices later ?" he 
was asked. 

"It was not hard to convince them 
that they were foolish to hold off, I 
studied up the price question and pre- 
pared a list of the advances made in 
other lines. I got the price of beefsteak, 
of pork, of clothing, of building material 
and then I got the prices ten years ago. 
The advance in each case was truly re- 
markable. Then at the bottom of the 
list I gave the price of paint and the 
advance was certainly not nearly as 
large as in the case of the other things. 
If any customers came in and started to 
talk about the price of paint, or in any 
way gave me an opening, I promptly 
sprung these figures. To back them up, 
I showed the price of paint ingredients 
and pointed out that it was useless to 
expect the price of paint to go down 
when the cost of making paint was go- 
ing up by leaps and bounds all the time. 
I made quite a number of converts that 
way and, as a result, found that they 
were always ready to buy paint without 
further delay." 

This dealer has continued to give a 
certain amount of window space up to 
paint all summer and has found that 
business has continued more steadily 
than at any previous stage of his busi- 
ness experience. 



Arsenate of Lead 



Facts About Insect Destroyer That is Gaining in Popularity — 
Unusually Dry Season Has Created Big Demand — Customers 
Should be Cautioned as to Its Poisonous Nature. 



The extremely hot and dry weather 
which has been experienced in the east- 
ern part of Canada this summer, has 
resulted in a very heavy demand for in- 
sect destroyers, in order to protect 
trees, shrubs and vines. In some cases 
the chemicals which have been in use for 
this purpose during many years past, 
have not produced the same results as 
usual, and the public have been looking 
around for some new article which might' 
prove more effective in meeting this 
year's conditions. 

This will account for the ready sale 
which has been found for Arsenate of 



Lead, an insect destroyer practically 
new to the trade this year. 

Uses of the Chemical. 

Arsenate of lead is a useful article 
for all who wage war against leaf eat- 
ing insects and parasites which thrive 
upon the products of our fruit trees, 
berry bushes, orchards and gardens gen- 
erally. The application of arsenate of 
lead has quickly come into general use 
at a comparatively recent date and the 
hardware trade, especially in the fruit 
growing districts, will do well to see 
that their stocks are well assorted to 
56 



meet the requirements of purchasers 
throughout the season. 

Careful tests have been made which 
show that the action of the arsenate of 
lead is most destructive to the pests, 
and, consequently, beneficial to the gar- 
dener or husbandman. Its general em- 
ployment is apparently only a matter 
of a very short time. 

Arsenate of lead will not replace 
Paris green, which is so well understood 
in its application to the potato vine, 
but will prove a valuable complement- 
ary aid to this popular destroyer of the 
farmer's foes. 

Directions for Using. 

The arsenate of lead is used in the pro- 
portion of 2 lbs. of the chemical to fifty 
gallons of water, and it is sprayed upon 
the plants or leaves, preferably in the 
evening. For spraying the potato vine a 
whisk, or watering can with a fine noz- 
zle, may be used, but for large acreage 
or for fruit and trees which are over 
head it would be better to buy a spray- 
ing machine and attach it to the barrel 
containing the diluted mixture. 

Innocent Looking, But Poisonous. 

Arsenate of lead is white in color, and 
has a very innocent appearance. It is, 
however, highly poisonous, and it is im- 
portant that dealers should caution their 
customers to keep it out of the reach of 
children. This chemical is made in Can- 
ada, and may be procured through the 
regular jobbers. 



BUSINESS NOT INTERRUPTED. 

The Martin-Senour Co., whose Mont- 
real factory was damaged by fire last 
week, report that business is again go- 
ing on as usual, and none of their cus- 
tomers have been inconvenienced. 

The fire, which broke out at 11.40 a.m. 
on July 2nd, was discovered by the 
watchman on the fourth floor, and a first 
and second alarm were immediately sent 
in. Through the able and courageous 
work of the Montreal Fire Department 
it was speedily under control, the prin- 
cipal loss resulting from water which 
did considerable damage to printed mat- 
ter, such as labels and advertising mat- 
ter. 

There will be no delay whatever in 
the execution of orders, and the equip- 
ment is again in full operation. 



IMPROVING EVERY ISSUE. 

Your paper is improving with every 
issue, and has some excellent reading 
in it. I would not be without it for 
a good deal. 

W. Glassford, 
Beaverton, Ont. 



HAKDWARE AND METAL 



The ML Paint Plan Makes 
More Money for Paint Dealers 



M-L 

Paint 

A great assortment of 
shades perfectly mixed 
and ready for use by 
any buyer. Best pro- 
tection, easiest applied, 
least troublesome for 
your customer. He 
"does a good job" and 
your sales get the bene- 
fit. Extra large cov- 
ering capacity. 




M-L 
Floorglaze 

A heel-proof, water re- 
sisting floor finish that 
may also be used as a 
self-varnishing outdoor 
paint. Double service — 
double sales — double 
profit. The kind that 
we advertise so largely. 




M-L 
Elastilite 

Free flowing scratch- 
proof flexible ivarnish 
of high lustre — saves 
the troubles of ordinary 
varnishing. Best and 
easiest way to protect 
your customer who 
wants a fine job. Carry 
this advertised line. 



WRITE FOR PRICE LISTS, SAMPLES, SHADES AND OUR DEALER PROPOSITION 

Imperial Varnish & Color Co., Limited 

6-24 MORSE ST., TORONTO 



108 PRINCESS STREET 
WINNIPEG 



524 BEATTY STREET 
VANCOUVER. B C. 



I 




A Word 




to the Wise 




is sufficient. A word to you, Mr. Dealer, about 

MINERVA 

Paints and Varnishes 

should be the same thing. We assume that you have secured an enviable reputation 
by handling honest goods and by employing honest methods. Here's a new paint 
and varnish being manufactured in Canada. The Pinchin-Johnson Company, ot 
London, England, have been manufacturing Minerva brand for /6 years ihe qual- 
ity of their product is unquestioned. The ingredients of their paints and varnishes 
are the purest and best obtainable. The manufacturing process is scientific— the 
machinery in our big, new Canadian factory is thoroughly modern and up-to-date. 
Large railroad and steamship companies and prominent decorators all over the 
world use this brand. , _ 

It's an attractive proposition for you from every side — reputation and pront, 
.Make Minerva brand your headliner. Write to-day for information and dealers 
price list. 

PINCHIN, JOHNSON & CO. (Canada), Limited 

Established in England in 1834. 377-3&7 Carlaw Ave., Toronto, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 11. -The heat of the 
past two weeks has not Ken ar a-. c .et 
to the paint and old trade. Travelers 
frequently found retailers peevish, cus- 
tomers were also irritable and the 
tendency was to avoid work. In this 
wav the paint trade did not profit 
greatly from the weather's prescrip- 
tions. Those who manufacture insecti- 
cides report a renewed demand. Ar- 
senate of lead is moving fairly well and 
there has been an exceedingly heavy call 
for Paris green from Quebec and the 
Maritime Provinces, and it is with great 
difficulty that peremptory orders to 
ship have been met. The Ontario de- 
mand has evidently subsided, the po- 
tato bug evidently being like Sherman, 
marching to the sea. 

Linseed Oil.— Quietness prevails in the 
linseed oil market and quotations are 
rather firm. The excitement that has 
characterised this article for some time 
past seems to have subsided. Probably 
it is only the effect of the weather. 
Prices are unchanged, raw per gal., 
$1.01, boiled $1.04. 

Turpentine.— Warm weather such as 
has been experienced of late is not any 
too good for turpentine. The market- 
has been rather dull of late, and there 
is no great effort to encourage heavy 
shipments. However, at the present 
figure turpentine is considered a fair 
purchase far present supplies and for- 
ward demand. The price is unchanged 
at 75c. Manufacturers report fairly 
generous shipments. 

Varnishes.— Encouraged by the easier 
tendency in turpentine, varnish manu- 
facturers are stocking moderately and 
while for immediate shipment the mar- 
ket is rather lax still there are some 
good orders being booked. 

Paris Green.— It. might he pointed out 
to buyers that there is a total ab- 
sence of Paris green in 1-ft. packages 
in tins or paper. Quotations are made 
just the same for the sake of uniform- 
ity. The demand of late has been ex- 
ceedingly heavy from Quebec and the 
Maritime Provinces, one result being 
the fact that the market is bare of 
Paris green in the smaller packages. 
Prices are as follows with something of 
an upward tendency:— In barrels, about 
600 fts., 17c per ft.; arsenic kegs, 250 
fts., 17£c; 50-ft. and 100-ft. drums, 
18ic; 25-ft. and 100-ft. drums, 18|c; 
1-ft. ipackets, 100 fts. in case, 20ic per 
ft.; 1-ft. packets, 50 fts. in case, 20fc 
per ft.; ^-ft. packets, 100 fts. in case, 
22}c per" ft.; 1-ft. tins, 100 fts. in 
case, 21£c per ft. 

Arsenate of Lead. —The demand is 
spasmodic and as the article is but 
little known dealers are buying light- 



ly it would seem. Prices are unchang- 
ed as follows:— In bbls., about 800 fts., 
9c; in half-bbls., about 400 fts., 9ic; 
in 25-ft. wooden kegs, 10c; 5-ft. bot- 
tles, 12c, in 2-ft. bottles, 13c; in 1-ft. 
bottles, 14c. 

Putty.— Demand for putty is fairly 
well maintained. Prices are steady as 
follows:— Bulk, bbls., $2.20; bulk, cwts., 
$2.15; bladder, bhls., $2.70; bladder 
cwts., $2.80; 25's, loose, $2.25; 25's, 
cased, $2.70; 12i's, cased, $2.90. 

White Lead. — There is nothing new to 
report in regard to white lead. The 
amount of business done is considerable 
for this time of the year. — Lots of one 
ton, $5.85; contracts of five tons and 
over, $5.70; shipments less than one 
ton. $6 f.o.b. Montreal. 



TORONTO. 



Toronto, July 13. — Although some job- 
bers complain ot a slackening of business 
during the past few days, others speak 
of present conditions as quite satisfac- 
tory. "We have found business well sus- 
tained right along so far," said one man. 
At any rate, there has been no sign yet 
of the "July slump." There is generally 
a falling off in trade during the middle 
of summer and this temporary slackness 
has been called the July slump. Frpm 
present indications, this condition is not 
likely to assert itself this year. 

Prices have been firm during the past 
week but a few minor changes are not- 
ed. 

Linseed Oil.— No change has been re- 
corded this week, the prices quoted be- 
ing $1.05 for raw and $1.08 for boiled. 
Nevertheless, rumors, of a contradictory 
nature have been going around. For in- 
stance, it was asserted that oil has 
gone as low as 91.01 and $1.02 for raw, 
but no jobbers were offering at that 
figure. The facts seemed rather to point 
to an increase. The price in England 
has been steadily advancing by slow de- 
grees, an increase of 8d. having been 
made to-day. While this has not yet af- 
fected local prices, it is exercising some 
influence. "'From some quarters in 
Great Britain it is stated that supplies 
are scarce," .said one jobber, "and not 
quite equal to the demand. Other points 
say that owing to the coronation busi- 
ness has been very dull. As regards the 
supply of seed there does not appear to 
be anything offering in the British mar- 
ket to indicate that the crop in India is 
sufficiently large to reduce the price, 
and for Canada there seems no possibil- 
ity of new supplies until seed comes for- 
ward from the Western Provinces." 

Turpentine.— Some doubt is expressed 
as to the future of turpentine. It is 
still claimed at Savannah and Jackson- 

58 



ville that the present prices are lower 
than had been anticipated and that there 
will soon be some advance, the condition 
of supplies does not bear this out., From 
the quantity now in store, it rather 
looks as though the supply during the 
rest of the present month and August is 
going to be considerably in excess of the 
demand. An unusual accumulation is 
taking place at present and, during the 
past week there has been something 
like 5,000 barrels added to the present 
stock. It is, therefore, not at all im- 
probable that a further small reduction 
may result. 

Locally, the situation has been the 
same. No price change has taken olace, 
the figure quoted being 75 cents. 

Rosin.,— The rosin market is, perhaps, 
easier to control and the storage ex- 
pense is not as heavy as in the case of 
turpentine. Consequently, less difficulty 
is experienced in maintaining the price 
of rosin and, while it looks as if com- 
mon rosins might become cheaper in the 
near future, it is quite possible that the 
speculators may be able to control the 
accumulations of rosin, so as to keep up 
the prices until the season is nearly 
over in the hope of a demand later. 

Putty.— There is a consistent demand 
for all grades at present. Standard 
putty is quoted at : Bulk, in casks, 
$2.20 ; in 100-ft. drums, $2.25 ; in 25-ft. 
drums, $2.65 ; bladder, in barrels, $2.75. 
Pure putty prices remain the same ; 
bulk in casks, $2.50 ; in 100-ft. drums, 
$2.80 ; in 25-ft. drums, $2.29 ; bladder, 
in barrels, $3. 

White Lead.— The demand has grown 
to heavy proportions. The price re- 
mains steady and there is no evidence of 
a reduction, either in the present or the 

future. . 

Red Lead. -The jobbers report a fair- 
ly good demand and are quoting 4f 
cents in 100-ft. lots. There is a satis- 
factory volume of business ahead. 

Prepared Paints. -Although some 
houses state that there has been a slow- 
er call during the past two weeks, gen- 
eral opinion inclines to take a more sa- 
tisfactory view of the situation. Plenty 
of sorting-up orders are being received 
and the general volume of business is 

good. .... 

Varnishes anb Japans .-Conditions are 
still active and there is a good call for 
all lines. The best grades are said to be 
selling exceptionally well. 

Glass— A good percentage of the 'busi- 
ness beiog done by the jobbing houses is 
in glass. It is too close to the placing 
of import orders for business to be very- 
heavy but small orders are coming in 

steadily. , 

Petroleum .-There is a heavy demand. 
Prices are down a cent, present quot- 
ations being : Sarnia prime white, Hie; 
American water white family safety, 
13c ; Pratt's Astral, 14^c. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




" Suggestion Book "—A twenty-four page booklet of fine-colored prints of harmonious color schemes for interiors and exteriors. 



w* 



Cfl The mission of paint is to beautify and protect. 

CJ The mission of the "Suggestion Book" is to meet the request 
made of us by customers all over the Dominion for suggestions for 
harmonious color combinations. 

Cfl This book enables agents for B.-H. "English" Paint to advise 
their customers regarding colors for home decorations and to show 
prospective customers how various color combinations would appear 
on buildings of different architectural designs. 

€J Any enterprising merchant anywhere will have a permanent 
profitable paint department with B.-H. " English " Paint and B.-H. 
selling helps. 

CJ If there is no B.-H. "English" Paint agency in your town, write 
our nearest office. 




59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



These prices are for such qualities and 

Quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
ealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor If. mxtom to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in I bin lint, as the desire 
Is to make it perfectly accurate. Retailers 
desiring to get In touch with firms selling any 
articles on which quotations are made can do 
so by writing the editor. 



METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS 

ANTIMONY. 

C'ookson's or Halletts, per lb .... 8 25 8 25 . 

BABBIT METAL 

Canada Met al Company — Imperial, genuine 
50a; Imperial Tough, 5)c; White Brass, 35o. 
.Metallic, 35c. ; Harris Heavy Pressure, 25c, 
Hercules, 25c; White Bronze, 15c; Star 
Frlctionless 10c; Alluminoid, 9c; No.4; 
io. per lb. 

Arctic MetaL— XXX Genuine, 50c; Supe- 
rior, 45a; A Special, 35c; Hoo Hoo, 25o ; "A" 
20c: "li, 18c; "C," 15c; "D, 12c; No. 1, 
10a; No. 2 8c: No. 3, 6o. 

Magnolia Metal Co. — Magnolia, 25c 
Defender, 20c. ; Mystic, 17c. ; Kosmic, 15c 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 

Montreal. Toronto 

Plates, 1 to J inch, per 100 lb.. 2 20 2 20 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 45 2 45 

Tank plates, 3-16 inch 2 30 2 40 

Tubes per 100 feet, 11 inch . . 9 50 9 00 

" 2 " . . 8 25 8 50 

" 2| " . . 10 50 10 00 

3 " .. 12 00 12 10 

" Si. " .. 15 00 15 30 

" 4 ' .. 19 25 19 45 

BRASS. 

Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge o 22 

Rods, base V 2 to 1 inch, round .... 21 

Tubing, seamless base, per lb 25 

Tubing, iron pipe size, 1 lnoh base.. 23 
Copper tubing, 4 cents extra. 

BRASS GOODS, VALVES, KTO. 

Ground work, 65 p.c. 

Standard Compression work, 65 p.c. 

High grade compression work, 60 p.c. 

Cushion work, 55 per cent. 

Fuller work, 70 p.c; No. 0, 75 p.c., and 1 and 2 

.Main cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway stop and stop and waste cocks, 65 

p.c; roundway, 60 p.c. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check. Valves, 55 

p.c; Standard, 65 p.c. 
J.M.T. Radiator "Valves, 60; Standard, u5 ; 

patent quick-opening valves, 70 and 10 p.c. 
Kerr extra, standard, globes, angles and 

checks, 60 p.c. 
Kerr Jenkins' disc, standard valves, 621 p.c 
Kerr copper alloy disc standard globe, angle 

and check valves, 62i p.c. 
Kerr standard radiator disc valves, 65 and 10 

p.c; Jenkins disc and quick opening hot 

water radiator valves, 75 p.c. 
Kerr Weber l.B.B.M. straightway and water 

ga te valves, screwed and flanged, 62} and 

10 p.c. 
Kerr N.P. Union ElbowB, 75 p.c. 
Kerr " Radium" valve discs, 45 p.o. 
Jenkins' Valves— Quotations or/ mplicatlon 

»o Jenkins' Bros.. Montrep 
COPPER 

Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot 13 75 13 25 

Out lengths, round bars, 1 to 2 in . . 21 00 
Plain sheets. 14 oz., 14x48", 14x60".. 23 00 
Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60, 14 oz. . 20 50 
Copper sheet, planished, 14x60, base 28 00 
Braziers', in sheets, 6x4 23 00 

COPPER AND BRASS WIRE 

Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 62J p.c. 

IRON AND STEEL 

In car lots. Montreal. 

Canadian foundry, No. 1 

No.2 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig ir n. . U 35 
Summaries, No. 2 " . »» jO 

Oarron .special t» 00 

Carron, soft .. r5 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 75 

Clarence, No. 3 18 00 

Jarrow 17 *5 

Glengamock 

Radnor, oharcoal iron 32 00 

Ayresome, No. 3 18 15 

Ferro Nickel pig iron (8oo) 

Steel billets, Bessemer or open 

hearth, f.o.b. Pittsburg 

Angles base 2 50 

Common bar, per 100 lb 190 

Forged Iron f 05 

Refined " " 1 15 

Horseshoe Iron " i 15 

vrilit «t.»«l ' 85 



Sleigh shoe steel 1 90 2 15 

Iron finish machinery steel 

(domestic) 195 2 15 

Iron finish steel (foreign). . . . 2 25 2 25 

Reeled machinery steel .... 2 85 3 00 

Tire steel 2 00 2 35 

Sheet cast steel 15 15 

Toecalksteel 2 85 2 9) 

Mining cast steel 071 08 

Highspeed 65 65 

Capital tool steel 50 

Oammell Laird 15 

Black Diamond tool steel.... 08 08 

Corona tool steel 06% .... 

Silver tool steel 12% .... 

GOLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

9-16 to 11-16 Inch 06 

Jtol7-16 " 051 

17-16to3 " 05 

Montreal, 25 and 2. Toronto. SO. 

BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal Toronto 

lOgauge 2 30 2 50 

12 " 2 30 2 55 

14 " 2 20 2 35 

17 " 2 20 2 45 

18 " 2 20 2 45 

20 " 2 20 2 45 

'2 " 2 25 2 55 

i* " 2 26 2 55 

in " 2 35 2 65 

as " 2 40 2 80 

CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 90 2 90 

All bright, 52 sheets 3 70 4 00 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 90 8 70 

9 40 9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRUGATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 " " 5 00 

26 " " 3 85 

28 " " 3 65 

Less 10 p.c. 



Toronto 


19 50 


19 00 


19 00 


22 50 


20 50 


20 75 


20 50 


22 50 


32 50 


25'6o 


27 50 


2 50 


2 05 


2 20 


2 30 


2 30 


2 15 



GALVANIZED SHEETS 

B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown 
16-20.... 3 60 3 35 3 60 
22-24.... 3 65 3 40 3 65 

26 4 05 3 80 4 05 

28 4 25 4 00 4 25 

Colborne Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.75, 4.00. 

Less than case lots 10 cents per hd 
'Comet" sheets— 

22 


Gorbal's 
Best 
3 60 

3 65 

4 05 
4 25 

extra. 

. 3 65 


24 


. 3 70 


26 


. 3 75 


28 


. 4 00 


Apollo brand— Montreal Toronto 

26 " 3 85 3 50 

28 " (£6 English). 4 10 3 95 
10J oz., equal to 28 English 4 35 4 25 

IRON PIPE. 

Size (per 100 ft.) Black. Galvanized 


i •• 2 25 1 ' 


. . . 3 08 


1 " 2 63 1 " 


. . . 3 48 


j " 3 28 } " 


... 4 43 


1 " 4 70 1 " 


... 6 35 


U •• 6 41 11 " 


... 8 66 


11 " 7 70 li " 


... 10 40 


2 " 9 57 2 " 


... 13 86 


21 " 16 39 21 " .... 

3 " 21 52 3 " .... 


.. 22 14 
. . 29 07 


31 " 27 08 31 " .... 


... 36 58 


4 •• 30 78 4 


41 58 



IRON PIPE FITTINGS. 

Canadian malleable, 40: cast iron, 65; 
standard bushings, 70; headers, 60; flanged 
unions. 65; malleable bushings, 65 ; nipples, 
75 and 10 ; malleable, lipped unions, 65. 

SOIL PIPK AND • ITTING8 

Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 inch, 
70 and 10 ; 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c 

Light pipe, 60 and 10 p.c.; fittings, 70 and 
10 p.c. 

RANGE BOILERS 

30-gallon, Standard, $4.75; extra heavy, $7.00 

KITCHEN SINKS 
Cast iron, 16x24, $1 ; 18x30, $1.15; 18x36, $1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 15 x 24, $2; 18 x 30, 
$2.35: 18 x 36, $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS. 

Gas ranges, 50 per cent 

Stoves and Ranges — 45 to 55 per cent. 

Furnaces — 45 per cent. . 

Registers— 70 to 75 pe- cent. 

Hot Water Boilers— 50 and 10 per cent. 

Hot Water Radiators— 50 and 10 per oent. 

Steam Radiators— 50 10 and 21 per oent 

Wall Radiators— 50 and 10 p.e 

Specials— 25 p.o. 

OLD MATERIAL 

Dealers buying prices : 

Montreal Toronto 

Heavy copper and wire, lb. 11 11: 

Light oopper bottoms 09 09 

Heavy red brass 10 10 

" yellow brass 08 08 

Lightbrass 06 06, 

Tealead 021 02 

Heavy lead 02J 02 

Scrapzino 03 04 

No 1 wrnntbt Iron 12 SO 10 00 



Machinery oast sorap.No.l 16 00 14 50 

Stove plate 12 50 13 00 

Malleable 9 00 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel 5 00 6 00 

Old rubbers 09 081 

LEAD. 

Montreal Toronto 

Domestic (Trail) pig, 100 lb 3 60 3 75 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 3 75 3 75 

Bar pig, per 100 lb 4 15 4 25 

Sheets, 21 lb. sq. ft., by roll. . . 4 50 5 00 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. ft 4 25 4 75 

Out sheets ic per lb. extra. 

Cut sheets to size, Jc per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE 
Lead Pipe and Waste, 30 p.c. 
Caulking lead, 4fo per pound. 
Traps and bends, 50 per oent. 

solder. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 241 261 
Wiping 22 24* 

SHEET ZINC. 

5-owt. oasks 7 50 7 50 

Part oasks 8 00 8 Oo 

SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb 6 10 6 25 

TIN AND TINPLATES 

Lamb and Flag and Straits — 
56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $48 00 49 00 

Redipped Oharcoal Plates — Tinned 
MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) Per box 

I 0,14x20 base $/ 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X. 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Murex Grades— 

I C, 14x20 base 5 00 

IX, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

I C, 14x20 base 7 00 7 00 

IX, 14x20 base 8 25 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 9 50 

"Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

in, 14x20 base 4 50 

I X, 14x20 base 5 25 

I XX, 14x20 base 6 00 

Bright Cokes 
Bessemer Steel — 

I C, 14x20 base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Teme. 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheets 7 50 

IX, TerneTin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade — 

XX, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.1 
" 14x60, " V . . . . 7 00 

" 14x65, " J 

Tinned Sheets. 
72x30 up to 24 gauge, case lots 7 75 7 35 
•' 26 " 7 85 

WIRE 

ANNEALED OUT HAT BAILING WIRE. 
No. 10, $3,80; No. 11, $3.90; No. 12 and 13, 
$4; No. 131. $4.10; No. 14, $4.25; No. 15, $4.50 
in lenghts 6" to 11", discount 30 per cent, 
other lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra ; if eye or 
loop on end add 25c per 100 lbs. to the above. 

0LOTHE8 LINE WIRE. 

No 7 wire solid line. No. 17, $4.90; No 
1«, $3; No. 19, $2,70; 6 wire solid line, No 

17, $4 45; No. 18, $3 10; No 19, $2 80 Al 
prices per 1000 ft. measure; 6 strand. No 

18, $2.60; No. 19, $2.90 F.o.b. Hamilton 
Toronto, Montreal, London. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9, $2.45 In cars f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. In 
10 0-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18, $5.50; No, 

19, $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, $7; No. 22. 
$7.3U; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24, $8; No. 25, 
$9; No. 26, $9.50; No. 27, $10; No. 28, $11; 
No. 29, $12; No. 30, $13; No. 31, $14; No. 
32, $15; No. 33, $16; No. 34, $17. Extras net. 
Tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos 26-3i $4; 
Nos 30-34, $6 Coppered, 75c ; oiling, ' 10c; 
in 25-lb. bundles, 15c ; in 5 and 10-lb bundles, 
25c ; in 1-lb. hanks, 25c ; in 1-lb hanks, 38c. ; 
in 1-lb. hanks, 50c ; packed in casks or cases, 
15c ; bagging or papering, lOo. 

HAT WIRE IN COILS. 

$2.35 base f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, Ham- 
il - on and London. 



GALVANIZED WIRE 

From stock, f.o.b. Montreal — 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5, $2.80; 6, 7, 8, $2.75; 9, $2.30; 
10, $2.80; 11, $2.85; 12, $2.45: 13, $2.55; 
14, $3.15. In car lots straight or mixed. 

POULTRI NETTING. 

Jin. mesh, 19 w. g., 60 and 21 p.c. off. Other 

sizes, 60 and 5 p.o. off. 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per cent. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.35 base; No. 10 gauge, 6o 
extra ; No. 11 gauge, 12c. extra ; No. 12 gauge, 
20c. extra; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra; No. 14 
gauge, 40c. extra; No. 15 gauge, 55a extra; 
No. 16garge, 70c. extra. Add60c. for copper- 
ing and$2fc»tinning 

Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, bright soft drawn 15c, 
cbarooal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in oasks 
or oases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, In 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, In 1-lb 
banks, 50a, in 1-lb. hanks 75c. In 1-lb. 
hanks $1. 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls, $1.65 per 
100 sq. ft. ; in 50-ft. rolls, $1.70 per 100 sq. ft. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 45 

Galvanized, plain twist .... 2 75 

Car lots and less. 
Dominion special field fencing, S3J p.o. small 

lots; extra 5 p.c. 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

WIRE ROPE 

Galvanized, 1st grade, 6 strands, 24 wires, I, 
$5 ; 1 inch, $16.80. 
Black, 1st grade, 6 strands, 19 wires, i, $5 
inch, $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. Toronto. 
WROUGHT STAPLES 

Galvanized 2 85 

Plain 2 60 



PAINTS. OILS AND GLASS 

BARN FAINT 

In barrels, 1-gal. tins 80 85 

In barrels, 5-gal. tins 80 85 

BEESWAX 

Perlb 40 

CHEMICALS 

In casks per lb 

Sulphate of copper (bluestone) 07 

Litharge, ground 05 

flaked 051 

Green copperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugar of Lead 09 

COLORS IN OIL 

Venetian red, 1-lb tins pure 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 018 

Golden ochre, pure .... 011 

French ochre, pure 09 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure 15 

Signwriters' black, pure 17 

Marine black, 25 lb irons 05 

ENAMELS 

Per gallon in quart tins. 
M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & C. 

Co 1 80 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 4 50 

GLUE 

French medal 10 

German common sheet 10 

German prima 15 

White pigsfoot .- 15 20 

Brantford medal 10 

golden medal 11 

" brown sheet 10 

golden sheet 13 

" gelatine 22 

" white gelatine 20 

" white glue 12 

" lOOflake 10 11 

Perfection amber ground, No. 1230 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 
Brantford all-round glue, 1-lb. packages, 10c; 
i-lb., 15c.; 1-lb., 25c. Discount. 

PARIS GREEN. 

Montreal Toronto 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 181 181 

Packets, 1-lb., 100 in case ... 201 20} 

1-lb., " 221 221 

Tins, 1-lb., 100 in case 21} 21} 

PARIS WHITE 

In bbli 90 

PIGMENTS. 

Orange Mineral, oasks 09 

lfln-lb. kegs 09} 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

Per gallon in qt. tins 

Sherwin-Williams paints, base — 2 00 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 1 75 2 00 

Globe house paint (Windsor) 160 

" New Era" house paint (Windsor). 1 85 

Benj. Moore Co.'s "Egyptian" Brd 1 50 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.C 1 65 

BrBndram-Henderson's "English." 1 95 

Ramsay's paints, pure 1 60 

Ramsay's paints, Thistle 1 30 

Martin--enour, 100 p.c. pure 2 00 

Senour's floor paints 160 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. v. 40. Co) 1 90 



60 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hair Floor 

m 

[^ Brooms ■• 




and Bannister 
Brushes 





BOECKH'S BRUSHES and BROOMS 

have for years embodied all the leading features that go to make up in their 
combination goods that are perfect, as regards quality, durability and finish. 

The dealer who is not handling "BOECKH'S" is missing an opportunity of 
getting and holding the best class of trade which only a reliable article can 
secure for him. Let us have your enquiry now. 

The BOECKH BROS. COMPANY, Ltd., Toronto, Canada 



OFFICES :— 80 York Street. 



FACTORIES:— 158 to 168 Adelaide St. W. 



This cut is repro- 
duced from a photo- 
graph of a Bowser 
System installed for 
Geo. W. Ecclestone, 

; Bracebridge, 
Ontario. 

We will reproduce 
another installation 
in the next issue of 
this magazine. 




This system 
handles 

Boiled Linseed 

Raw Linseed 

Turpentine 

Machine 

Engine 

Castor 

Cylinder 

Separator 

Gas Engine and 

Fly Oil 

No evaporation 
nor waste. 



A Profitable Way to Handle Paint Oils 

Do you know that paint oils can be handled without waste ? The Bowser System does away with measures and funnels. They 
measure the oil, count the gallons pumped and show the money charged for it. 

They put every cent of paint oil profit in your pocket. They are safe, space saving, clean and profitable. They buy themselves by 
their saving. Don't spend your money, Invest it in a Bowser. Ask for catalogue No. 1 N, it's FREE. 

S. F. BOWSER ®, CO., LTD., 66-68 Fraser Ave., TORONTO 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLASTER OF PARIS 

Per barrel 2 30 

PINE TAR 

Half-pint tint, per dozen 60 

PUTTY. 

Standard. 

Balk In casks 2 20 

" 100-lb. drums 2 55 

Bladder* In bbla . . 2 75 

RED DRY LEAD. 

Uenulne, 680 lb. casks, per owt 4 75 4 75 

Genuine. 100 lb. kegs, " 5 25 5 25 

No. 1. caak«, per 100 lb« 4 25 4 25 

No. 1. kegs, per 100 lbs 4 75 4 75 



SBINOLE STAINS. 
In 5-gallon buokeU 



75 



TURPENTINE AND OIL. 

Montreal Toronto 

Can. Prime white petroleum gal ... . u 12 

U.S. Water white " .... u 134 

U.S. Pratt's astral " .... 151 

Oaetor oil, per lb., In bblB 08 u9 

Motor Gasoline single bbls. ... . 0174 

Benzine, per gal single bbls — 15J 

Pure Turpentine, single barrels 75 78 

Wood Turpentine 80 

Turpentine, second run 60 

Linseed Oil. " raw.. 1 01 1 07 

bnllerf 1 01 1 10 

Kosin, "G" grade, bbl. lots, 100 lbs. . . 3 25 



VARNISHES. 

Per gal. oana. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 

Pale durable body .... » 50 

" hard rubbing 8 00 

Finest elastlo gearing S 00 

ElaetloOak 150 

Furniture, polishing 100 

Furniture, extra 120 

" No. 1 95 

" union 90 

Llghtollflntoh 1 35 

Gold size japan 2 00 

Turps brown Japan 1 60 

No. 1 brown Japan 110 

Baking Hack Japan 135 

No. 1 blaok Japan 95 

Benzine blaok Japan 76 

Crystal Damar 150 

No. 1 " 115 

Pure asphaltum 140 

OUoloth 150 

Lightning dryer 8* 

KlastUlte Tarnish t 25 

Qranltine floor finish 2 2> 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish . . 2 b0 

Canada Paint Co s sun varnish — 2 25 

" Kyanlze" Interior Finish 2 40 

" Flint-Lao," coach 180 

B.H. Go's "Gold Medal," In oases 2 50 

Flattine floor finish 8 00 

Blastloa exterior finish * 9* 

Stovepipe varnish, 4 pints, per gross 8 00 
Pure white shellac varnish, in barrels 1 75 

Pure orange " 1 70 

No, 1 orange " 1 25 

WINDOW GLASS 

Size United Double 

Inohes. Star Diamond 

Under26 »4 35 $ 6 15 

26to40 4 65 6 75 

41to50 5 10 7 50 

51 to 60 5 35 8 50 

61to70 5 75 9 75 

71 to 80 6 25 11 00 

81to85 7 00 11 50 

86to90 }5 00 

91to95 17 50 

96W100 20 50 

Toronto, 30 p.o. to 30 and 5 p.o. 

WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL. Per 100 lb 
Montreal Toronto 

Munro's Seleot Flake White 6 90 

Elephant Genuine 6 90 

Moore's Pure White Lead.... 6 15 

LilyPure 6 00 6 15 

Tiger Pure 6 00 6 15 

Monarch (Windsor) 6 50 

Essex Genuine (Windsor) 6 15 

Brandram's B.B. Genuine.. 7 25 7 40 

" Anchor," pure 6 00 6 15 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 6 00 6 15 

Ramsay's Ixterio' .... 5 75 6 15 

C.P.Co.'s Decorators' Pure.. 6 00 6 15 

Western Schedule. 

Terms— 2 p.c. 30 days or net 3 months from 
date of shipment. Packages 25 lbs. and over. 
500-lb. kegs, 15c per 100 lbs. lower. Delivery— 
F.O.B. Toronto or Hamilton ; London, 5c per 
100 lbs. extra. Contracts as required until 
15th May, 1911. 

WHITE ZINO (DRY). 

Bxtra Red Seal, V.M o 074 

WHITE ZINO III OIL.) 



WHITING. 

Plain, inbbl* 70 

Gliders bolted In barrels 100 

HARDWARE 

ADZES. 

Carpenters', per doz II 60 14 00 

Plalnshlp, " 18 00 12 00 

AXES AND HATCHETS 

Single bit, per doz 6 00 9 00 

Doubleblt " ....1000 12 00 

Bench Axes 6 75 10 00 

Broad Axes 22 75 25 00 

Hunters' Axes 5 00 6 00 

'Boys' Axes 5 75 6 50 

Lathing hatchets 4 70 10 00 

Shingle " 1 45 6 75 

Claw •' 1 70 5 00 

Barrell " 5 50 6 85 

ANVILS 

Parlor-Forbes, prospeotors 051 

Buokworth, per lb 10} 

AMMUNITION 

"Dominion" Rim Fire Cartridges and 
C.B. caps, 50, 10 4 2 p.c.;B.B caps,5i>, lOand 
24 p.c, C ntre Fire Pistol Cartridges. 25 and 
24 nc; Centre Kire Sporting and Military 
Cartridges, lu and 10 p c ; Primers, 10 and 24 
p.c; Brass Shot Shells, 45 and 124 P-d Shot 
Cartridges, discount fame as ball cartridges, 
f.o.b. any jobbing point east of Manitoba. 
Net 90 days. 

"Crown" Black Powder, 30 and 10 p.c; 
" Sovereign'' Bulk Smokeless Powder, 30 and 
10 p.c; " Regal" Dense Smokeless Powder, 30 
and 10 p.c; " Imperial'' Shells, both Bulk and 
Dense Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c 
Empty 8hells, 30 and 10 p.c. 90 days net. 

Ordinary drop shot, AAA to dust (7.50 per 
100 lbs. Discount 25 per oent ; oash discount. 
2 per cent, 30 days ; net extras as follows 
subject to cash discount only ; Chilled, 40 o.: 
buok and seal, 80o.; no. 28 ball, $1 20, per 100 
lbs.: bags less than 25 lbs., 4c. per lb.: F.O.B. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, St. 
John and Halifax, freight equalized. 

AUGERS AND BITS 

Ford's auger bits 30 and 10 

Irwin's auger 474 

Gilmour's auger 60 

Rockford auger 50 and 10 

Gilmour's car 474 

Clark's expansive 40 

Jennings Gen. auger, net list. 

BARN DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs 

Stearns wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Atlas, steel covered 5 00 6 00 

Perfect 8 00 1100 

New Milo, flexible 6 00 

Double straphangers, doz. sets 6 50 

Standard jointed hangers, " — 6 45 

Steel King hangers " 6 40 

Storm King and safety hangers — 6 25 

Storm King rail 4 25 

Crown 4 85 

Crescent 6 50 

Sovereign 7 25 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 

Hangers, 5 per cent. 
Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in. (100 ft.). . . . 3 25 



BARN DOOR LATCHES 

Challenge, dozen 1 15 

Defiance, dozen 2 75 

Gem dozen 7 50 



Door bells, push and turn, 45 and 10 p.u. 
Cow bells, 65 p.c. 

Sleigh bells, shaft and hames, pair, 22c up. 
Sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1.15 up. 
Farm bells, No. 1, $1.65. 



Pure, In 25-lb. Irons 

No. 1, '• 

N<v 9. " " 



084 
07 
05} 



Bxtra, 60, 10 and 10 per oent. 

Standard, 60, 10, 10 and 10 per oent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10,10 and 10 

Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per oert 

Laoe leather, per side, 80c; out laoes, 85o. 

BIRD CAGES. 

Brass and Japanned, 40 p. o. 

BOLTS AND NUTS 

Carriage Bolts, common new $1 list Per cent 
" " | and tmaller... 70 

" " 7-16 and up 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, 8 and less 60, 10 4 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 60 

Plough Bolts 55, 5 & 10 

Blank Bolts 60 

BoltEndfl 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, j and less. . . 60 and 10 
Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 & larger 55 and 05 

Coach Screws, new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 4jjc per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 44c per 11 ft. 
Stove rods, per lb., 54 to 6c 
Ht/>ve Knit* SO. 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Slater's paper, per roll 70 

O. K. paper, No. 1, per roll 75 

O. K. paper, No. 2, per roll 70 

Plain Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. roll 45 

Plain Fibre, No. 2, " 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. roll. . . 55 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2, " . . 35 

Tarred Fibre Cyclone, 25 lb., per roll 55 

Dry Cyclone, 15 lbs 45 

Plain Surprise, per roll 40 

Resin sized Fibre, per roll o 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 lbs.. 4 00 

Heavy straw, plain 4 tarred, per ton 37 50 

Carpet Felt, per 100 lbs 150 

I'arred wool roofing felt, per 100 lb.. . 1 80 

Pltoh, Boston or Sydney, per 100 lbs 70 

Pitch, Hootch, per 100 lbs 65 

Heavy Fibre. 32' 4 60', per 100 lbs. . . . 3 00 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per square 70 

3 ' ,f " " .... 95 

2 Ply oomplete, per roll I 15 

S ,r " 135 

Liquid Roofing Cement, brls., per gal 15 

" tin. " an 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Refined al Tor, tins, per doz 1 25 

Refined Coal Tar, per barrel 4 50 

Shingle varnish, per barrel 4 50 

Caps, per lb 06 

Nails, per lb 05 

Mop cotton, per lb 15 

BUTTS 

Plated, bower barff 4 nickel, No. 241, 45 p. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. off revised list 
Cast iron loose pin, 60 p.c. 
Wrought steel fast joint an loose pin, 70 p.c. 
Crescent brands, 70 per cent 

CEMENT AND FIREBRICK 
Canadian Portland, bags per bbl 1 55 1 70 

White Bros. English '. 1 00 1 06 

' ' Lai arge " cement in wood 3 40 

Fire brick, Sootch, per 1,000 .... 13 00 78 00 

English 17 00 2100 

" American, low 33 00 25 00 

" " high 27 50 35 00 

Fire olay (Sootoh), net ton 5 50 



CHALK AND PENCILS 
Carpenters Colored, per gross.. 65 80 
" lead penolls, per grs 2 40 I 75 



CHISELS. 

Cold chisels, 5 x 6 In , doz 2 20 

Bevel edge, 1 inch, doz 2 50 



Proof coil, per 100 lb., i In., $6.00; 5-16 in., 
$4.85; | In., $4.25; 7-16 in., $4.00; J in., $3.75; 
9-16 in., $3.70; | in., $3.65 ;J in., $3.60; i in., 
$3.45 ; 1 in., $3.40. 

Stall fixtures, 35; trace chain, 45 °, jackchaln, 
Iron, 50; jack chain, biass, 50; cow ties, 40: 
halter chains, 50 and 5 ; tie outs, 75 ; coil 
chain, 50 and 5; hammock chains, galvan- 
ized, 35 and 5. 

CHURNS. 
No. 0, $9 ; No. 1, $9 ; No. 2, $10 ; No. 3, 
$11 ; No. 4, $13 ; No, 5, $16.; f.o.b. Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 40 
per cent.; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston and 
Montreal, 374 and 10 per oent. 

CLAMPS 

Malleable swivel head, 4 in 2 50 

" adjustable, 4 in 7 60 

Carpenters, 3 feet 3 60 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

2 Inch, in 1" toot lenghts 3 30 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 28 

5 " " " 7 26 

6 " ' " 8 80 

COTTER PINS 
Cotter pins, 90 p.o. Msntreal 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 
Oopper boilers, kettles, 50 p.o. 
Oopper tea and coffee pots, 45 p.o. 
Copper pitts, 30 per oent. 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 45 p.o. 

• DOOR KNOBS 

Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per oent. 
Porcelain, mineral and jet knobs, net list, 

DOOR SETS. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per oent. 
Door pulls, 60 per cent. 

DOOR HANGERS (PARLOR) 

Single sets, each (Easy brand) 1 80 

Double sets, each 3 25 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet ... 5 00 



IAVETBOUGHS. 

8 Inoh in 100 foot length* 2 90 

10 " " " 3 15 

11 " " " 3 68 

15 " '• " 5 25 

Add extra 10c. per 100 ft. O.G. Round Bead 
Trough. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Milk oans and pails, 40 p.o. 
Hand delivery and oreamery oans, 40 p.c. 
Railroad and cream oans and taps, 45 p.c 
Oreamery trimmings, 75 and 124 P.O. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, oork-lined, 35 per oent. 

FARRIER KNIVES 
Buokworth, 50 p.o. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Per oent 

Disston's 70 and 10 

Great Western, American 70 and 10 

Kearney 4 Foot, Arcade 70 and 10 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 70 and 10 

McClellan, Globe 70 and 10 

Blaok Diamond 60 and 10 

Dslta Files 60 

Nicholson 623 

Jowett's (English list) 274 

FOROES 

Blacksmiths portable, 135 lbs 9 85 

GALVANIZED WARE 
Duflerin pattern pails, 50 per oent 
Flaring pattern, 50 per cent 
Galvanized washtubs, 45 per cent 

GRINDSTONES 

Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 lbs. 1 
Smaller sizes extra. 

HAMMERS. 

Tack, Iron, doz 

Ladies claw, handled, doz 

Adze eye nail hammer,10oz , doz.... 

hickory handle, 1 lb., doz.. 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz .... 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz. , doz 

Tinners setting, 4 lb., doz 

Machinists, 4 lb. , doz 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs. and over 

Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
50 and 5 per oent. 

Sidewalk and stable sorapers, net, $2.1 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per oent. 
Lawn rakes, net. 

HALTERS 
Jute Rope, l-lnoh vm gross 



DOOR SPRINGS 
Chicago (coil), 25 per cent. 
Reliance (coil), 20 per cent. 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Carpenters 6 inch, doz 5 36 

Folding handles, 8 inch, doz 1 80 

DRILLS. 

Bit stook drills, 2-32 in., dos 67 

ESCUTCHEON PINS 
Steel, discount 50 per oent. 
Brass. 55 per oent. 

62 



35 

60 

1 25 

6 25 

7 00 
5 60 
4 60 
3 2i' 
06 
08 
09 



to Rope, |-lnoh yei «i 

n •» £ ii '*** ii 



* ou 

10 00 

11 00 

4 00 

5 10 
1 4fi 


7 16 
7 00 
6 75 
6 50 
6 35 


4 

3 50 



p. 0. 



Leather, l-lnoh per dos. 

Leather, 1J " " .... 

Web 

HINGES 
Blind, discount 50 per oent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-ln 100 lb. net. , 

" " 5-in. " 

" " 6-in., " , 

" " 8-ln., 

" 10- In. ind larger . 
Light T and strap, discount 65 P.O. 
Sorew hook and hinge- 
under 13 n per 100 lb 

over 12 in " 

Orate hinges and baok flaps, 66 and 5 
Ohei t hinges and hinge hasps, 65 p.o. 

HINGES (SPRING) 
Spring, per gross— No. 5, $16.10; No. 10, 

$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 50, $17.58; No. 

51, $7.76; No. 120, $16.10. 
Screen door sets— No. 2250, $14.95 ; No. 2260, 

$19.55; No. 2275, $21.85; No. 1192, $19.55. 
Chicago hold back screen door, iron, gro. $12. 
Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c. 
Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c. 
Chicago surface floor (6,000), 45 p.c. 
Garden City fire house hinges, 124 P-c. 
"Chief" floor hinge, 50 p.c. 

HOOKS 
Wrought Iron hooks and staples— 

Ji5 per gross 2 25 

5-16x6 B .... 3 40 

Bright wire screw eyes, 60 p.o. 

Bright steel gate hooks and staples 

Iron screw hooks, 60 and 20 p.o 

Iron gate hooks and eyes 60 and 20 p.c. 

Crescent hat and coat wire. 60 per cent. 

Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and square hooks, 

60 p.c. 

HORSE KAILS. 
M.R.M. cold forged process, list 3rd January, 

1910, $2.80 per box base No. 9 and larger. 
Capewell brand, quotations on application. 

HORSESHOES. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy, No. 
2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $4.15; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.40; " X.L" steel shoes, new 
light pattern, 1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.35; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.60; " XL." steel shoes, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes, No. to 4, 
$5.75; special countersunk steel, all sizes, 
0-4, $6.25; toe weight steel shoes, all sizes, 
No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J. P. 4 Co., "Blunt" No. 
1 and smaller, $1.50; No. 2 and larger, $1.25. 
" Sharp" No. 1 and smaller, $1.75 ; No. 2 and 
larger, $1.50 per box. Put up in 25-lb. boxes. 

HORSE WEIGHTS. 
Taylor-Forbes, 44.0. per lb. 

IOE CREAM FREEZERS. 
White Mountain. 50 p.o. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




SuretyBond 



Congo* 

roofing! 

i J 

THE owner of a building covered 
* with Congo has the satisfaction of 

knowing that his roof is guara< teed tor 

ten years. 

In each roll of Congo 2 ply and 3 
ply is a genuine 'egnlly binding Surtty 
Bond issued by the National Surety 
Company of New York. 

This year we will guarantee thou- 
sands of roofs to last till 1921. 



Guaranteed Until 1921 



POf course we are not going to lose— we are 
offering a sure thing. We know Congo will 
last more than ten years. One thing the guar- 
antee forces upon us : it makes \is extremely 
careful in manufacturing. 

We provide, free of charge, galvanized iron 
caps which are rust proof and will last as long 
as the roofing. 

Send for free copy of our Guarantee Bond, 
a sample of Congo Roofing and further in- 
formation. 

UNITED ROOFING AND MFG. CO., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stark, Seybold, Limited, Montreal; Mechanics' Supply Co., Quebec; S. 
Hayward & Co., ?t. John, N.B. ; Miller-Morse Hardware Co., Winni- 
peg ; E. G. Prior & Co., Limited, Victoria. B.C. ; Hobbs Hardware 
Co., London, Ont. ; Fife Hardware Co., Fort William, Ont. 




The Roofing House of Canada! 



" The House cool in Summer, and warm 
in Winter." 

That's the line of talk that never fails to 
sell our Building Papers and Roofings. 

They are guaranteed to be made of finest 
quality materials, to withstand all kinds of 
climates, and to be easily laid by any 
ordinary workman. 

We also make all kinds of Wrapping Papers. 



♦' 




RED 

s 

BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 







^T"'^S 



GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



f *•*». 



THE TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

Works, DON SPEEDWAY TORONTO 



HEINISCH Tailor Shears 

Perfectly Finished — Correctly Tempered— Keen Cutting Edge 

Best Quality Japan Highest Quality Materials and Workmanship 




ALL JOBBERS STOCK THEM 

:: :: We also make :: :: 

SCISSORS, TRIMMERS, TINNER SNIPS 
The Best that can be Made 

R. Heinisch's Sons Co., Newark, N.J., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



KNIVES. 

Hay knives, net Hit. 
Clauss, 50 and 25 per oent. 

KITCHEN ENAMELED WAR! 

White ware, 75 per cent. 
LoDdon and Prlnoess, 50 per cent. 
Oanada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p.o. 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite steel, SO and 10 

per cent. 
Premier ateel ware, 40 per oent. 
Star decorated steel and white, 15 per oent. 
Hollow ware, tinned oaat, 50 per oent. off. 
Enamelled street signs, 40 p.o. 

KITCHEN SUNDRIES. 

Asbestos mats, 50 p o. 

Can openers, per doi 40 75 

Mlnolug knives per doi 50 90 

Potato mashers, wire, per doi. . . 60 70 

wood " .. 50 85 

Vegetable slloers, per doi 2 25 

Universal meat ohopper. No. 1 1 15 

Enterprise ohopper, each 1 50 

dplders and (ry pans, 50and 5 P.O. 

Star Al ohopper 5 to 52 1 55 4 10 

100 to 105 1 S5 J 00 

Kltohen hooks, bright 60 

Toasters, 50 p.o 
Fire shovels, 50. 
Oil stoves and ovens, 50 and 10. 

LADDERS 

3 to 6 feet, 12o. per foot; 7 to lft., 13c. 
Extension ladders, 15c. per foot up. 

LANTERNS. 

Japanned ware, 45 per oent. 

No. 2 or 4 Plain uola Blast per dox 6 76 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " b On 
Japanning, 50c. per dozen extra. 
Prism globes, per dozen, $1.20 
Lamp wick, 50 per cent. 

LAWN HOSE 
Competition grade lawn hose, 70 and 5. 

LAWN MOWERS 

Taylor Forbes Co. — 8-inch wheel, 3 knives, 
12 in., $5.10; 9-in. wheel, 3 knives, 12 in., 
$6.75; 9-in. wheel, 5 knives, 12 in., $7.75, 
lOJ-in. wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., $8.50; lOJ-in, 
wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., ball bearing, $10.00: 
50 per cent, f.o.b. Guelph. 

D. Maxwell & Sons— 8-inch open wheel, 
3 knives, 12 in., $5.10; do., 4 knives, $6.25, 
9-inch wheel, 3 knives, 12 in. sizes, $6.75; 
do., 4 knives, $7.25 ; 104-inch wheel, 4 knives, 
12 in. sizes, $8.50, ball bearing do., $10; 
do., 5 knives, $10.50. 50 per cent. f.o.b v fac- 
tory. 

LOCKS AND KJCJ8. 

Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 

LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES 

Cant hooks, dozen, from 12 00 

Axes, dozen, from 6 50 

Axe handles, dozen, from 115 

Cross cut saws, per foot 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

Ball and heel calks 4 00 4 25 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths', 2 J i 54 in. , per doz 1 25 

Carpenters', round hickory, 6 in., per 

doz 1 95 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per doz 2 40 

Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz 15 00 

MATS 

Wire door mats, standard, 16x24, doz. 9 00 
METAL POLISH. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

Axoline brass cleaner, 100 in package 6 50 

MINERS SUPPLIES 

Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, $6 dozen 
Picks, 6 to 71b., 4.65 doz. 
Piok handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 164 oentsper lb 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, 3} cents per lb. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

Mops, per doz 120 150 

Folding Ironing boards 16 25 18 00 

NAILS Wire 

1— Ulnon 3 30 

liinch 2 95 

H— IS inch 2 70 

2— 2} inch 2 60 

2}— 2} inch 2 45 

3—3} inch 2 40 

Si— 4inch 2 35 

4l, 5, 54, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Out nails— Montreal, $2.40 ; Toronto, $2.60. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, 75 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, 334 per cent. 

Pressed spikes, { diameter, per 100 lbs. . 2 85 



PIECED WARX. 

Ulsoount 35 per oent. 

10-a t. flaring sap buckets, 35 ner oent. 

\ 10 and 14-qt. flaring palls 35 per oent. 

Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 35 p.o. 

Goal hods, 40 per oent. 

Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.o. 

PLACES 

Wood benoh, Canadian, 40, Amerloan, 25 p.o. 

Wood, fanoy, SO to 35 per oent. 

Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3.60, net list prloes. 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 
Button's genuine, 37i to 40 per oent. 

PUMPS. 
Berg's wing pump, 7 5 per oent. 

RAIORS. per doi. 

Boker's 7 50 11 00 

KlngOutter 15 00 

Henokel'i 7 B0 10 00 

Clauss automatlo safety 27 00 

Olauss perfect stropper 16 00 

Gillette Safety, eaoh 3 76 

mams Razors and Strops, 50 per oent 
Ever Ready Safety » 00 



Plumbers 



OAKUM. 
..per 1001b.... 



4 60 



Kemp's Tornado and MoClary s Model 
galvanized oil oan, with pump, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, 40 per oent 

Zlno and tin, 50 per oent 

Coppered oilers, 50 per oent. off. 

Brass oilers, 50 per oent, 

Malleable, 25 per oent 

PLATED GOODS 
Hollowware, 40 per cent discoun 
Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, and 50. 
Hutton's "Cross Arrow" flatware, 424 per 

cent. "Singalese" and "Alaski" Nevada 

silver flatware, 42 p.o. 



084 
104 

185 
24 



08 
84 
65 
80 
. 95 

27 
26 
30 
45 
35 



ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal rope 

Pure Manilla rope 

"British " Manilla . 

Cotton, 3-16 ini h and larger 

Russia Deep Sea line, } in. diam. and 

over, 154 ; under } in. , 164- 
Jute, | and upwards, 9c; under 8, 94c. 

Lath yaro, single 

Lath yarn, double 

Sisel bed cord, 48 f (set, per dozen 

Sisel be«t cord, G feet, per dozen . . . 
Sisel bed cord, 72 feet, per dozen . . . 
Cotton clothes line, 274 off. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine .... 
" 4-ply twine .... 

Mattress twine, per lb 

Staging " " 

REPRIGERATOBB 

Sanderson-Harold, 40 per oent. 
Galvanized, 45 p.o. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, blaok and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 

Iron Burn, 60 and 10 and 10 p.o. 

Copper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 35 and 

12J per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, 224 p.o. 
Extras on Coppered Rivets i-lb. packages 

lc per lb.; i-lb. packages 2c. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 3c. per lb. 
Coppered Rivets, net extra, 2Jc. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, 55 to 874 per oent. 

RULES. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 2 foot, doz 115 

vory, No. 1282, 2 foot, eaoh 3 50 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

" No. 50, nlokle-plated, " 85 

" handles, Japaned, per gross 8 40 

Common, plain 4 25 

" plated 5 50 

Asbestos, per set 150 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 
Sand and emery paper, 40 per cent 

SASH WEIGHTS 

Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb 2 25 

Sectional, % lb. each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to 30 lbs 155 

SASH CORD. 
No. 8, per lb 33 

SAWS. 
Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, 15 per oent. 
Simonds Hand. 15 per cent. 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 35 per cent 

SAW SETS. 

Canadian discount 40 p.o. 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS Doz 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in., style 7 80 

Common doors or 3 panel, grained 

only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 284 

inches 1 60 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, open 

224 inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 364 

Inches 2 25 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 35 ; Champion, 50 p.c. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35; Weigh Beams, 35; Champion 
Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 50; 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 ; 
Weigh Beams, 30. 

SCYTHE SNATHS 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

screws Per cent 

Wood F.H., bright andsteel 85 and 10 

" R.H., bright 80 and 10 

1 F.H., brass 75 and 10 

" R.H., brass 70 and 10 

" F.H., bronze 70 and 10 

" R.H., bronze 65 and 10 

Drive screws 85 and 10 



Set, case hardened 60 

Square oap 50 and 05 

Hexagon oap 45 

Benoh, wood, per doz $6 00 

" Iron, per doz 4 25 

SCREWS (MACHINE) 

Flat head, Iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Fillister head, Iron, SO; brass, 26 per oent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 1 00 

North Bros., No. 30, per dozen .... 16 80 

SCISSORS AND SHEARS 

Olauss, nlokel solssors and shear*, N; Jap»> 

65 ; tailors, 4b ; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's. 50 and 10 per oent 

SHELP BRACKETS 

No. 140 66 and 10 p.o. 

SKATES AND HOOKEY STICKS. 

Starr skates, 374 Per cent. 
Boker, hockey 30c. upwards ; spring, 
Empire hookey sticks, $3 00, $3.50. 
Miomac and Rex sticks, $4.00, $6 or 
Pucks net, $1.50. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Oanadlan, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 24 p.o.; 
No. S and 4 grade, 50 and 24 p.o. 



Disston's 60 and 10 p.o. 

Stanley Try Squares, size 7J, doz. net. . $2 85 

SNAPS. 

Harness, 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS 

Base, per lb., 28 oents. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, 75 and 124 Per cent. 
Retinmd, 75 and 124 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 



Poultry netting, 100 lbs 5 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind.perlb jg 

Coopers' staples, 45 per cent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per oent. 



STABLE ITTTINGS. 
Dennis Wire ft Iron Oo», 334 p.o. 

STOVE BOARDS 

Lithographed, 60 and 10 



STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 Inoh, per 100 lengths 

7 lnoh " " 

Nestable, 40 per oent. 



trunk nails, black, 6b and 10; trans nails, tin- 
ned and blued, 65 and 10; clout nails, blued 
and tinned. 65 and 10 ; chair nails, 35 and 10 : 
patent brads, 40 and 10 ; fine finishing, 40 and 
10; lining tacks, in papers, net; lining tacks, 
in bulk, 15 ; lining tacks, solid heads, in bulk, 
75; saddle nails, in papers, 10; sad<Le nails, 
in bulk, 15; tufting buttons, 22 line in dozens 
only, 60; zinc glaziers' points, 5; double 
pointed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 55; clinch point shoe 
rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 874; 
trunk tacks, 80 and 20 ; strawberry box tacks. 
80 and 10. 



TAPE LINES. 

Universal, ass skin, No. 714, 66 ft., doz. 3 0U 

Lufkins, linen, No. 404, 66 ft., eaoh 94 

" steel. No. 264, 66ft., eaoh .... 3 50 
ObeBterman' t linen, No. 1822, 66 ft. ea. 1 lu 

" Metallic No. 1821 1 96 

Steel, No. 1840, 50 feet .... 4 10 



TROWELS. 

Disston's, 10 per oent. 

THERMOMETERS 

Tin case and dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 p.o. 



TINNERS SNIPS. 

Discount 35 per cent. 



TINNERS TRIMMINGS 

Discount, 45 per cent. 

Plain and retinned, 75 and 124. 

TRAPS (STEEL GAME) 

Newhouse, 30 per cent. 

Hawley & Norton, 40, 10 and 5 per oent. 

Victor, 60 and 5 per cent. 

Oneida Jump (Star), 50, 10 and 5 per cent. 

TRAP8 (RAT AND MOUSE) Doz 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps 60 

n RatTraps 120 

Easy Set Mouse 45 

" " Rat 95 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 45 

Rat Traps 95 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse Traps 25 
Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat Traps 80 
5-Hole Tin Chokers 80 

VISES 

Per pound 12 12* 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 55 

Sawvise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths', 60 ; parallel, 45 per cent. 



7 62 

8 18 



STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-lnoh, common per doz. 122 

7-inoh « 1 35 

Polished, 15o per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 p.o. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 
No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 



STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 



Washita per lb. 25 

Hindostan " 06 

" slip " 18 

" Axe " 

Deer Creek *' 

Deerliok " 

" Axe " 

Lily white " 

Arkansas " 

Water-of-Ayr " 

Scythe per gross 3 50 



18 75 



37 
10 
020 
10 
10 
25 
15 

42 

1 50 
10 
500 



TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; tinned, 
85 ; (in kegs), 40 ; cut tacks, blued, in dozens 
only, 80 and 10 ; } weights, 60 ; Swedes cut 
tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in 
dozens, 75 and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', 
bulk, 90 ; brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 
and 10 ; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and jap- 
anned, 824; zinc tacks, 35; leather carpet 
tacks, 35 ; copf - *»cks, 45 ; copper nails, 50 ; 



WASHING MACHINES 

New Ontario 41 26 

Round, re-acting, per doz 81 25 

Square, re-acting, per doz 77 50 

Dowswell 52 50 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 25 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 52 50 

Ottawa 55 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 50 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer 180 00 

20 per cent. 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., doz 47 76 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 50 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 inch 53 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 inch 58 25 

Favorite, 5 year, 11 inch 61 75 

20 per cent. 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 20 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

WHITELETREES 

Tubular steel whiffle trees, 28 in 70 

" " " 34 in 100 

" " " 36 in 125 

" " neokyokes, 36 in 1 05 

" " doubletrees, 40 in 95 

" " lumbermens, 44 In 1 15 

WOOD HANDLES 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and shove 

handles, 40 p.c 
Extra ash fork, hoe, *ake and shovel handles, 

45 per cent. 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 p.c 
Carriage neckyokes ana whiffletrees, ash 35, 

hickory 40 p.c. 
Team neckyokes, oval aud round whiffletrees, 

hickory and ash, 35 p.c 
All other ash goods, 40 p.c 
All hickory, maple and oak goods 35 p.c. 

WRENCHES 

Agricultural, 674 P-o. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHEBS 
Canadian, 50 per cent. 



64 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ramsay's 

Creosote 

Stain. 




You should know something 
about these beautiful Shingle 
Stains. They are great for 
preserving shingles and are be- 
coming more popular every 
day. 

Formerly everybody was oblig- 
ed to import all these goods. 
Now, we make them. 

Ramsay's 

Shingle 

Stains 

are unequalled by any import- 
ed goods, and there is no duty 
to pay. 

You can get full price for them 
and make a good profit. They 
are put up in imperial measure 
cans and barrels. 

Write for our card and prices 
and see what we can do for 
you. 

A. RAMSAY & SON CO. 

Established 1842 

The Paint Makers 
MONTREAL 



ZINC SPELTER 

Domestic and European 

Only the best brands of each. 
Stock or import. 



Always inquire from 

"THE METALS HOUSE" ' 

A. C. LESLIE a CO., Limited 

MONTREAL 



Facts About Paint 



The real facts about paint are known to but few — these may 
interest you : — 

Different climates affect paint — a paint made to resist the damp 
atmosphere of the Eastern Provinces may not prove equal to a 
paint manufactured to resist the dry atmospheric conditions of 
the Central Provinces. A paint which proves successful in a 
moderate climate is not so suitable for the tremendous climatic 
extremes of the Prairies. 

To obtain the best results you must use a paint suited to the 
climate where it is used. We have been manufacturing a 
paint especially to meet the climate conditions of the West for 
the past thirty years, and our success is evidenced by the 
tremendous growth of our business. . 



Hundreds of Dealers sell GfZ5Mten4 Pure Ready Mixed 
Paints to their and their customers' entire satisfaction — because 
— they are good goods, they are guaranteed to give satisfaction 
and they give satisfaction. 

We also guarantee prompt, courteous service — "Let us give you 
details." I 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO. 

Limited 

WINNIPEG - - - CANADA 

Branch at Calgary, Alta. 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 



Occasionally advertisement* arc inserted in the paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advertising order. The index is inserted solely for the con- 

vanience of the readers of the paper. 



American Cutlery Co • 

American Mhearer (Jo 80 

Auienrun TtuNspim'l Ob 1* 

American Wringer Co 31 

Andrews Wire Works, Ltd 34 

Anti Splash Killer Co 80 

Atkins 4 Co., E. 86 

Atlas Mfg. Co 81 

Auto Controller Co , The 30 

A Timer Pump and Scale Co 82 

A Y. DlnM Bllloa Brick & Lime Co 80 

BarneU, O. * H. Co. . . .outside back cover 

Barton Netting Co 87 

Bemis * Call Hardware and To 1 Oo. . . 78 

Bluet. J. A 80 

Boeckh Bros »7 

Bosses Banks 80 

Booth-Coulter Copper & Brass Co 78 

Bowser, 8. F., & Co., Ltd W 

Brandrani-Henderson, Ltd ■'& 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 84 

Burrow Stewart & Milne Co. Ltd 22 

Cameron 4 Campbell 20 

Canada Cement Co inside back cover 

Canada Foundry Co '8 

Canada Metal Co 80 

Canada Paint Oo 3 

Canada Steel Goods Co 8 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co 78 

Canadian Copper Co 78 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 20 

Canadian Gas Users Assurance 80 

Canadian Hart Wheels 80 

Canadian Hearing and Ventilating Co 21 

Canadian National Carbon Co 33 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co 81 

Canadian Supply Co 74 

Carbon Oil Works 75 

Carborundum Co 1 

Cartland & Son, Ltd Jas 31 

Caverhill, Learmont ,4 Co S 

Chapin-Stevens Co., The 78 

Cheney 4 Son. S 80 

Chicago Spring Butt Co. inside back cover 

Clarkson & Sons, E. R. C 10 

Collins Mfg. Co 81 

Connor, J. H., & Son 87 

Consumers Cordage Oo 34 

Oopp. W. J.. 8ons4 Co 21 

Corbin Oil Works 75 



Corbin, P. a F 

Orookes, Jonathan, 4 Son. 
Cummer-DowBwell, Ltd 



Dana Mfg. Co 20 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 8 

Dennis Wire & Iron Co 28 

Directory of Manufacturers 80 81 

Disston, Henry, & Son 

Dominion Cartridge Co 4« 

Dorken Bros outside front oover,77 

Dougall Varnish Co 67 

Erie Iron Works Co 78 

Evered 4 Co 15 

Ford Auger Bit Co 72 

Frothingham 4 Workman, Ltd 4 

GendronMfg. Co. Ltd 34 

Gibb, Alexander 80 

Gilbertson, W., 4Co 23 

Goodell-Pratt Co 32 

Greening, B., Wire Co 24 

Grove Chemical Co 79 

Guelph Spring arid Axle Co 76 

Gutta Percha 4 Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside baok cover 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co !8 

Harris, J. W., Co 87 

Heinisch. R., Sons Co 59 

hilborn & Co., Ltd 81 

HobbsMfg. Co 69 

Howland, H. S., Sons&Oo 7 

Hutton. Jas., 4 Co 78 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 53 

International Distributing Co 26 

International Varnish Co 74 

James 4 Reid 80 

Jardine, A. B., 4 Co 23 

Johnson 4 Sons, OH 33 



Kyle, P. 



81 



Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 30 

Leslie, A. C, 4 Co 61 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

London Foundry Co 86 

London Bolt and Hinge Works 81 

London Rolling Mill Co 23 

Luflrin Rule Co inside back cover 



Lundy Shovel and Tool Co 88 

Luther Grinder Co outside back cover 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

McArthur, Alex., 4 Co 59 

McClary Mfg. Co 19 

McDougall, R., Co 82 

McKarlane* Douglas 28 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 82 

McKinnon Chain Co 83 

Manitoba Gypsum Co T9 

Martin, L. Co 76 

Martin-Senour Co 87 

Maxwell, D., 4 Sons 82 

Meriden Britannia Co 17 18 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 28 33 

Metallic Roofing Co 29 

Mitchell 4 Co. . David 80 

Moore. Benjamin, 4 Co 71 

Morrill, Chas 79 

Morris 4 Bailey Steel Co 83 

Myers & Bro., F. E.t 76 

National Acme Mfg. Co 26 

National Hardware Co 84 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 8" 

Nicholson File Co 27 

Norsworthy Co., Ltd., C 21 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Northern Aluminum Co 16 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 81 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons 75 

Oneida Community. . 35 38 

Ontario Lantern 4 Lamp Co., Ltd 83 

Otterville Mfg. Co 78 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 25 

Parmenter Bullock Co., The 81 

Paterson Mfg. Co 59 

Pease Foundry Co 23 

Peterborough Lock Co. . . inside back cover 

Pinchin- Johnson & Co., Ltd 53 

Pink, Thos 85 

Queen City Oil Co 14 23 

Ramsay, A., & Son Co 61 

Remington Typewriter Co 32 

Richards- Wilcox Mfg. Co 29 



Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., P. L 79 

Rogers Son & Co., Hy 40 

Robs Rifle Co 88 

Samuel, M. 4 1, , Benjamin, & Co 84 

Saskatchewan Glass 4 Supply Co 20 

Seymour, Henry T. , Shear Co 76 

Sharratt 4 Newth 81 

Shaw, A., & Son 81 

Sheet Metal Products Co 2 

- hurly-Dietrich Co. Ltd 77 

Shute, A. A 78 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 86 

Boolean Limited 2i 

Southern States Turpentine Co 63 

Standard Automatic Mfg. Co 13 

Standard Chain Co 87 

Standard Mfn. Co 30 

Standard Paint and Varnish Co 78 

Stanley Rule and Level Co 30 

Staun' on8 Limited i7 

(■teelCo of Canada, Ltd 6 

Steele. Ltd., Jas 81 

Stephens G. F 61 

Stewart Mfg. Co., Jas., Ltd 25 

StiU, J. H., Mfg. Co 24 

Stratford Mfg. Co J9 

Tallman Brass and Metal Co 79 

Tarbox Bros 81 

Taylor-ForbeB Co outside front cover 

Thompson, B. & S. H. . .outside back cover 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co R» 

Trewhella Bros 81 



Valor Co., Ltd., The 74 

Want Ads e6 

Watson Mfg. Co., John 81 

Western Clock Mfg. Co. .inside front cover 

Western Distributors, Ltd 80 

Western Wire and Nail Co 81 

Wheeler 4 Bain 79 

White Mop Wringer Co 71 

Whitman 4 Barnes Mfg. Co 85 

Whitlock & Marlatt 80 

Wilckes-Martin-Wilckes Co 69 

WilKinson Plow Co I 1 ' 

Winnipeg Ceiliog & Roofing Co 75 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co., Ltd 63 

Wri«ht. F. T.. 4 On 77 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Aluminum Ware 

Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie Pa. 
Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto 

Auger Bits 

Ford Auger Bit Co.. Holyoke, Mass. 

Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal 
Remi' gton Arms Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co , New York 

Anchors, Star Screw 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Babbitt Metal 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 
Frothingham 4 Workroan.Ltd., Montreal 
Magnolia Metal Co. Montreal. 
Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co , Hamilton 

Bar Iron 

Henry Rogers, Sons 4 Co., Montreal 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, NY. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
J. L. Goodhue 4 Co., Danville, Que. 

Sadler & Howorth, Montreal 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Gutta Peroha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Binder Twine. 

Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth. 
Mass. 

Bird Cages 

E. T. Wright 4 Co., Hamilton 

Boilers and Radiators 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto 
Taylor-Forhep Oo., Guelph, Ont. 

Bnlts and Nuts. 

London Bolt and Hinge Works, London 

Ontario 
The 3teel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Bolts— Expansion 

Star Expansio Bolt Co. New York 

Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co., Hamilton 



Brass Goods. 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Jas. Cartland & Son, Ltd., Birmingham, 

Eng. 
Morruun, J a-., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto. 
Tavlo»-Fnrhe> Oo . Ltd.. Guelph. Ont. 
Tallman Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 

Bridle Rings— Galvanized, 

Brass and Plain 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Brushes 

Boeckh Bros. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Stevens-Hepner (Jo., Port Elgin 

Burners. 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co., Hamil- 
ton, Ont. 
Builders' Tools and Supplies 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
OaverhlU, Learmont 4 Oo. . Montreal 
Frothingham* Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Howland. H. S. Sons 4 Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, ft Co.. Montreal. 
Lufkln Rule Oo. Saginaw. Mloh. 
Newman 4 Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rule 4 Level Co., New Britain. 
Tavlor-Forbea Oo., Guelph, O 

Calipers 

J. T. Slocomb Co., Providence, R.I. 

Cans. 

American Can Co. M ntreal. Que. 
Thos. Davidson Mfs. Co.. Montreal. 
McClary Mfg. Co., Toronto 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Carriers, Cash and Parcel 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton 

Carpet Sweepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, Grand 
Rapids, Mich 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Oo., Guelph. 

Cartridges. 

Dominion Cartridge Oo., Montreal. 
Union Metallic Cartridge Co., New York, 
U.S. A. 

Cash Registers 

National Cash Register Co., Toronto 

Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening. B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
McKinnon Chain Co., St. Catharines 
Oneida Community Limited, Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 



Cement 

Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 
B. & 8. H. Thompson 4 Co. , Montreal 

Chafing Dishes. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co.. Rntfaln 

Cbaplets 

S. Cheney & Son, Manlius, N.Y. 

Churns. 
Connor, J. H., 4 80ns. Ottawa, Ont 
Cummer- Dowswell Ltd., Hamtltor, Ont 
Maxwell, David, 4 bons, St. Mary's, Ont 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

America" Shearer Mfar. On..Nasbna,N.rl 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago 

Clocks 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co., La Salle, 
111. 

Clothes Reels and IJne* 

Cummer Dowswell, Ltd., Hamilton 
Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hamilton 

Clothes Wringers 

Cummer-DowsweU Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
American Wringer Co., New York City 

Cold Rolled Strip Steel 

The Morris 4 Bailey Steel Co.. Pitts- 
burs, P». 

Copper, Sheets. Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 
Toronto 

Cordage. 

Hamilton Cotton Oo., Hamilton. 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Corrugated Iron 

The Gait Art Metal Co., Gait. Ont 

Cow Ties 

Greening, B., Wire Oo., Hamilton 
MoKlnnon Dash and Metal Co., St 

Catharines 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls, 

Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
MoOlary's. T,ondnn. O***- 

The Sheet Metai Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright 4 Co., Hamilton 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

OaverhlU. Learmont 4 Oo. Montreal 
Orookes, Jonathan, 4 Son 
Dorken Bros. 4 Co., Montreal. 



Frothingham 4 Workman, Ltd.,Montrea 
Helnisch's, R. Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Howland. H 8. Son's 4 Oo.. Toronto. 
Hutton, Jas., 4 Oo., Montreal 
MoGlashan, Clarke Co.. Ltd., Niagara 
"all" 

Door Hangers 

Hunt, Helm Ferris & Co., Harvard, 111 
Richards Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora 111 

Drills — Brick and Stone 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Drills— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 

Dry Batteries 

Canadi n Carbon Co., Toronto 
Canadian National Catbon Co., Toronto 
Egg Boaters 
Geo. G. Veness Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass 

Emery or Corundum Wheels 

Canadian Hart Wheels Limited, Hamil- 
ton. Ont. 

Electrical Surplies 

Canadian General Electric Co., Toronto 
HlfiCtric Fixture*,. 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd.. Windsor, 

Ont 
MorriKon James. Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Enameled Ware 

Davidson Thos Mfg. Oo.. Monrrnat 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
MoOlary's. London. Om, 
Ernest Stevens, Ltd., Cradley Heath. 

England 

Engine Supplies, etc. 

Penberthy Injector Oo , Windsor, Ont. 

Eavetroughs 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Montreal 

MoOl«ry'«. T ondnn Ont 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
Wheeler 4 Bain, Toronto 
E. T. Wright 4 Oo.. Hamilton 
Escutcheon fins 
The Parmenter 4 Bulloch Oo., Gana- 
noque, Ont. 

Fencing— Woven Wire. 

The Steel Oo. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co . G 4 H.. Philadelphia, Pa. 
Delta File Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Disston, Henry, 4 Sons, Philadelphla.Pa. 
Nloholson File Oo.. P"rt Hope 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., Montreal 



66 



HAKDWARE AND METAL 



THE ^ 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY, 

LIMITED. 



ft® Am 



mimpmg Enadtefcrikll 



If so, we cordially invite you and your friends to 
make their headquarters while in the city at our 
offices, 140 Portage Ave. East; and when at the 
Exhibition our Exhibit in the Manufacturers' Build- 
ing where everything has been studied for your con- 
venience. 



THE 



EVERYTHING FOR A BUILDING 



LTD 



Edmonton 




Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine 

Second Run Turpentine 

Japanese Raw or Boiled Oil 



SOUTHERN STATES TURPENTINE CO. 

Montreal Office and Warehouse — De L'Epee Ave. and C.P.R. Tracks. 

Toronto Office — 101 Victoria St. Warehouse — Brock Ave. 

Main Office — Cleveland, Ohio 

P.S. — Correspondence solicited. Prices, as well as 
samples, sent on approval. If it is Price, Quality 
and Service you look to when placing your orders, 
you should be looking to us to fill them. 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Fire Extinguishers 

The V«l,»r Co Ltd.. Birmingham, Kng. 

Fire Irons 

Charles Lindsay, Glasgow, Scotland 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Harrington ft Richardson Sons Co., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

Fire Escapes. 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Damns Wire ft Iron Oo., uondon 

Fire Place Furnishings 

The Bai ton-Netting Oo . Ltd., Windsor, 

Out 
Charles Lindsay, Glasgow, Scotland 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia 
Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa 

Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago . 
Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Hamilton 

Forgings 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Furnaces, see Stoves 
Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Co.. Toronto. 
U.S. Steel Products Export Co., Mont- 
real 
Trios. Davidson Mfg. Oo.. Montreal 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Galvanized Iron 

W. Gilbertson ft Co., Ltd. Alex. Gibb, 

Montreal, Agent 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Glass 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Glass Ornamental 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Oo 

Toronto. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Glass Wired 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Oo. Winnipeg 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Pelton, Godfrey S. 

Rbarratt ft Nnwth. London, Ene. 

Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co,, Winnipeg 

Glue. 

The Canada Glue Co., Ltd., Brantford, 
Grove Chemical Co., Appley Bridge "tag. 

Go-Carts, etc. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Grindstones 

Richards- Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 

Guns 

Harrington ft Richardson Arms Co. 
Worcheater, Mass. 

Hammocks 

The I. E. Palmer Co., Middletown, Con. 

Handles. 

St. Mary's Wood Specialty Co., St. 

Mary's, Ont 
Still, J. H., Mfg. Oo , St. Thomas 

Hardware Specialtie- 

Hunt, Helm Ferris & Co., Harvard, 111 
Taylor- ForbeBOo., Ltd., Guelph, Ont 

Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Do., Hamilton. 
Cowan ft Britton, Ganonoque 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Out 

Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Oo., St. Thomas. 

Hooks 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham ft Workman. Ltd. Monf.ro, 1 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Horseshoes and v a»7. c 

Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Ice Cream Freezers 

Worth Bros Mfg On. PH1adelr>hl« 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Ice Catting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg. Oo., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Oo., Tororoo. 
FenberthylnjectorOo.. Windsor. Ont 

Iron and Steel Bars 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Irnr *>1ve 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Iron Pumps. 

Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer 
MoDoturall. R-i Oo., Gait, Ont. 



Ladders, Shelf 
Hamilton Bran Mfg. Oo., Hamilton 

Lampblack 

The I, Martin Oo , New York 

WiUkeH Martin Wilekes Co., New York 

Lamps 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Lanterns. 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Oo., Hamil- 
ton. Ont 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

The sheet Metal Products Oo. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Wright, It. X., ft Uo., tt.uitlton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, I)., ft Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Jas Smart Mfg Oo, Brookvllle, Ont 
Tavlnr. FnrhM Oo..Guelnb 

Lighting Fixtures 

Ja3. Morrison Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Locks, Knobs, n&cutcneona, etc 

Belleville Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Company 

Belleville. 
National Hardware Oo, Orillia 
Peterborough Look Mfg. Oo., Pet' r- 
borough, Ont. 

Lnmbering Tools. 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke. Ont. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Mcintosh, H. F., ft Oo., Toronto. 
Glbb. Alexander. Montreal. 
Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon 
Whitlock ft Marlatt, Moose Jaw 

Manteh and Grates 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor, 
Ont 

Metais. 
Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Canada Metal Oo., Toronto. 
OaverhiU, Learmont ft Oo. , Montreal 
Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Leslie A O, ft Co., Montreal. 
Lysaght, John, Bristol. Eng. 
Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal 
Nova Scotia steel and Ooal Oo., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Samuel. Benjaminft Oo.. Toronto. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Tal'man Brass & Metal Co., Hamilton 
Thompson, B. & S. H. ft Co., Montreal 

Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc- 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait 

Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co., Preston 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Oakey, John, ft Sons, London, Eng. 

Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co. Ltd., Toronto 

Mop Sticks 

Tarbox Bros. , Toronto 

Mop Wringers. 

White Mop Wringer Oo.,Fultonville.N. Y. 

Nail Pullers 

i The Bridpgeport Hdw Corp., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Nails Wire 

Parmenter & Bulloch Co., Oanannque 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
United States Steel Products 
Oo.. Montreal. 

Oilers 

Thos Davidson Mfg. Co.. Montreal 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd. , Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Wright, E.T., ft Co. Hamilton, Ont. 

Oil Stones, 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton, Ont 

Oil Stoves 

McClary Mfg. Co., London 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Oil Tanks 

Bowser, S. F., ft Co., Torono. 

Ornamental Iron and Wire. 

Canadian Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire ft Iron Oo., London, Ont. 

Paints. Oils. Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
W. T. Bigsby ft Sons, London, Eng 
Brandram-Henderson, Montreal 
Canada Paint Co.. Montreal 
Dougall Varnish Co. Montreal 
Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto 
International Varnish Oo., Toronto, Ont 
Martin-Senour Co.. Montreal 
Moore. Benjamin, ft Co. Toronto. 
Pratt ft Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, Can. 
A. Ramsay ft Son Co., Montreal 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Work. 

Windsor, Ont. 
G. F. Stephens & Co., Winnipeg, Man 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Paint and Varnish Remover 

Chadeloid Chemical Co., New York 
Dougall Varnish Co. , Montreal 
Imperial Varnish ft Color Co., Toronto 



Paint Bru hes. Automatic 

Standard Automatic Mfg. Co., New 
York 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Pig Iron 

steel Oo. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Pipe, Wrought Lead and 
Galvanized 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamil.on 

Plow Points 

Star Mfg. Co., Carpentersville, 111. 

Poultry Netting. 

Greening, B., Wire Co.. Hamilton, Otu 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal 

Pumps 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
R. McDougall Co., Gait, Ont. 

Putty 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

R.R. Angle Bars 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

R.R. Axles 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Razors. 

Gillette Safety Razor Co Montreal 
International Distributing Co., Montreal 

Razor Hones 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Hamilton 

Refrigerators 

Barnet Mfg. Co. Led., Renfrew, Ont. 
Metal Stamping Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Registers 

Canadian FerrosteelCo. , Bridgeburg, Can 

Rivets 

Steel Co. of Canada. Hamilton 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Co., Gananoque 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton 
West, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Barber Asphalt Oo, Philadelphia 
Brantford Roofing Co. , Brantford, Ont. 
Canadian Supply Co., Toronto 
Dominion Roofing Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Gait Art Metal Oo., Gait, Ont. 
McArthDT, Alex., A Oo., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallio Roofing Oo.. Toronto. 
United Roofing ft Mfg. Oo., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Oo., Winnipeg 

Rope 

Independent Cordage Co., Toronto 

Rules and Gauges 

Jas. Ohesterman ft Oo., Ltd., Sheffield, 
England 

Saws 

Atkins, E. O, ft Oo., Indianapolis, Ind 
Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia 
Shurley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont 
w «monds Mfe On.. Fitch hur Mass 
Spear & Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng 

Scales. 

American Cutlery Co., Chicago 
Aylmer Pump ft Scale Oo., Aylmer, Ont. 
Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Oo, Hamilton 
Frothingham ft Workman. M~ Teal 
Sherbrooke Scale Co., Sherbrooke.Que 
Screws, Nuts. Bolts 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Scythe Stones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
New York 

Shears, Scissors. 

R. Heinish's Sons Co., Newark. N.J 
J. Wiss & Sons Co., Newark N.J. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Frothingham ft Workman, Montreal. 
Lundy Shovel & Tool Co., Ltd., Peter- 
borough 

Silverware. 

McGlashan. Clarke Oo.. Niagara Fal's. 
Meriden Britannia Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Spikes, Railway, Ship or 
Pressed 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Sprayers 

Cavers Bros., Gait, Ont 

T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos Davidson Mfg. Oo., MontrA, 1 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Oh oago. 111. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Staples 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Steel— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 



Steel— Cold Rolled Strip. 

Morns ft Bailey SletlO j., Pittsburg, P 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Ooal Oo., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 
U.S. Steel Products Co., Montreal 

Stencils 

MoOlary's, Lonrto". Ont 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co.. Hamilton, imt 

Stoves, Furnaces 

Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Oo, Hamilton 

Glare Bros., Preston. 

W J Oopp, Son ft Oo, Fort William, Ont 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Mo"".»l 

The Down Draft Furnace Oo. Gait, Ont. 

Finlay Bros, ft Co., Carleton Place 

Gurney-Foundry Co . Toronto. 

McClary's. London, Ont. 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto 

Percival Plow ft Stove Co., Merrickville, 

Ontario 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 
Jas Smart Mfg Co, Ltd. Brockville, Ont 
Jas. Stewart Mfg., Co., Woodstock 

Tacks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd , Hamilton 
U.S. Steel Products Co., Montreal 

Tapes 

Jas. Ohesterman ft Co., Sheffield Eng. 
Luf kin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont 

Tie Plates 

steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Tiling— Wall and Floor 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Timber Jacks 

Trewhella Bros., Birmingham, Eng 
1m Hlate. 

A 0. Leslie ft Oo., Montreal 

Tools 

The Chapin Stevens Co., Pine Meadow, 

Conn. 
The Goodell-Pratt Co., Greenfield. Mass 
Spear ft Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield Eng 

Tool Grinders 

LutherGrinderMfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis 

Trucks. 

Aylmer Pump ft Soale Co., Aylmer, Ont 
Geo D Pearson ft Co., Montreal 
John Watson Mfg. Co., Ayr, Ont. 

Vacuum Cleaners 

Onward Mfg. Oo. , Berlin 

Valves 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Varnishes See Paints 

Berry Bios., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
The Glidden Varnish Co.. Toronto 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Geo D. Pearson ft Oo., Montreal 

Vises 

Hollands Mfg. Co., Erie. Pa. 
Chas. Parker Co., Meriden, Conn. 

Waffle Irons 

Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa 

Taylor Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co , Winnipeg 

Washing Machines, etc 

J. H. Connor ft Son., Ottawa, Ont. 
Oummer-Dowswell Ltd. Hamilton, Ont. 
D. Maxwell ft Son, St. Mary's, Ont 

Wagons— Children's. 

Woodstock Wagon Co., Woodstock 

Washers 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wheelbarrows 

Meaford Wheelbarrow Co., Meaford, 

White Lead 

Steel Oo. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Oaverhill, Learmont ft Co., Montreal. 
Frothingham ft Workman, Ltd Montreal 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Oo., Toronto. 
T.ewls Bros, ft Oo . Montreal. 

Wire — Iron, Steel, Brass and 
Copper. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wire Mats 

Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 
Watford, Ont. 

B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamilton 

Wire Goods, Bright 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Wire Goods 
Canada Wire Goods Mfe. Co.. Hamilton 

C. H. Johnson ft Sons, Ltd., Montreal 

Wire Machinery 

Ed. Brand, 472 Moss Lane E., Manches- 
ter. Eng. 

Wire Springs 

Jas. Steele Limited, Guelph, Ont 

Woodenware 

Wm. Cane, Sons ft Co., Newmarket, One 

Wrenches 

Cochran Pipe Wrench Co. 



68 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




WE LEAD THE WORLD 

The ever-increasing demand for 

BEAR BRAND 
LAMP BLACKS 

has necessitated this increase in our manufacturing 
facilities, as shown in the figures below: 
CAPACITY 
1902 - - - 3,000,000 pounds 
1905 - - - 6,000,000 " 

1911 - - - 10,000,000^ " 

Our growth is entirely due to the consistent high quality and absolute uniformity 

and purity of our products, together with the courteous treatment always extended 

to our customers. 

If you are not using OUR BLACKS, write us and we 

will submit samples and prices which will save you 

money and secure your orders. 

WILCKES MARTIN WILCKES CO. 

The Largest Makers of Fine Lamp Blacks in the World. 
Office, 135 William Street - - - New York 

Factory, Camden, N.J. 

CANADIAN AGENTS - E.FIELDING, 34 Yonge Street. Toronto. Ont. 

FRANCIS HANKIN, & CO.. 230 Coriatine Bldar., Montreal, Que. 



The above cut illustrates our complete plant, showing 
the new addition just finished. 




HOBBS 



We have forged a Five-link HOBBS Chain binding Four Branches with our 
European GLASS Purchasing Centre, Antwerp. 



(SiONl 




M0NTREALK ))T0R0NT0 




WINNIPEG 




GLASS 



Our^four branches carry large and complete stocks of GLASS of every descrip- 
tion for building purposes. 

WRITE US AT ONCE. 

The Hobbs Manufacturing Company, Limited 



LONDON 



TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



MONTREAL 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who wish to sell or buy businesses or 
■torks, obtain competent help, connect with 
•atlsfartory positions or secure aid in start- 
ing new enterprises, should not fall to use 
the Want Ad. Advertisement I'age of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL. It is the central mar- 
ket place of the hardware trade throughout 



Canada. There is always someone some- 
where looking for just such proposition as 
you have to offer. 

RATES— 2c per word first Insertion. 

lc per word subsequent Insertion. 

5c additional each insertion when Box 
Number is required. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



FOR SALE— Hardware, heating and plumbing busi- 
ness In live own. Stock amall. Owner wants 
^ to go West. Box 515, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. ( 24tf > 



FOR SALE-Flne new, clean, up-to-date stock of 
hardware, stores, granite and tinware in an ex- 
cellent farming country. Good live town of 4,000. 
Stock about $5,000. Last year's turnover nearly 
$18,000. Owner Interested in the West. Box 108b, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. Toronto. (7tf) 



J"OR SALE — Old established hardware and coal 
business. Or, one of present proprietors would 
take partner with some capital. Box 204, Iro- 



quois, Ontario. 



(27) 



FOR SALE -Hardware, stove and granite business. 
Established thirty years, doing a splendid busi- 
ness, stock will run about seven thousand and in 
fine shape. Yearly turnover twenty thousand ; good 
store, can be rented or bought; fine farming country. 
This business will stand closest inspection. At rate 
on the dollar. Wish to retire. D. FERGUSON. 
Teeswater. (16 "' 



WANTED -Five to six thousand dollar hardware 
business in first-class Ontario town in ex- 
change for first-class quarter wheat land in 
Saskatchewan. Box 522, HARDWARE AND METAL, 



Toronto. 



(28) 



SHEET METAL PATTERN DRAWING 



BY the ordinary method of learning by experience 
only it takes a tinsmith from 5 to 10 years to 
learn how to draw patterns for everything In 
sheet metal work, discover the easiest and quickest 
ways of doing things and learn how to estimate on 
work The lacs of this knowledge coats him many 
hundreds and even thousands of dollars in lost wages 
or profits. Ask any old tinsmith If this is not so. 
They did not have your chance of getting a cheap 
practical course In Pattern Drawing, Construction 
and Estimating. Our course gives you this know- 
ledge and, studied in connection with your everyday 
work it learns you more In six months than the old 
method would learn you In a lifetime. For the month 
of July only we offer this complete Course for $10 
cash Send for full particulars. This offer closei 
Aug 1st. AddressTHE SHEET METAL SCHOOL, 
Box 419, Gait, Ont. (30) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ACCURATE COST KEEPING IS EASY if you 
have a Dey Cost Keeper. It automatically records 
actual time spent on each operation down to the 
decimal fraction of as hour. Several operations of 
lobs can be recorded on one card. For small firms we 
recommend this as an excellent combination— em- 
ployees' time register and cost keeper. Whether you 
employ a few or hundreds of hands, we can supply you 
with a machine suited to your requirements. Write 
tor catalog. International Time Recording Company 
of Canada, Ltd. Office and factory, 29 Alice Street, 
Toronto. 

COUNTER CHECK BOOKS.— Write us to-day for 
samples. We are manufacturers of the famous 
Surety Non-Smut Duplicating and Triplicating 
Counter Check Books, snd Single Carbon Pads in all 
varieties. Dominion Register Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON SYSTEMS - Short, 

simple. Adapted to all classes of business. 

Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto and 
Ottawa. <«') 

COUNTER Check Books— Especially made for the 
hardware trade. Not made by a trust. Send us 
samplea of what,you are using:, we'll send you right 
prlees. Our holder with patent carbon attachment has 
no equal on the market. Supplies for Binders and 
Monthly Account Systems. Business Systems, Llm- 
<ed. Manufacturing Stationers, Toronto. (tf) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ADDING TYPEWRITERS write, add or subtraot 
r\ in one operation. Elliott Fisher, Limited, Room 
314. Stair Building. Toronto. 

BUSINESS GETTING Typewritten Letters and 
Real Printing can be quickly and easily turned 
out by the Multigraph in your own office — 
actual typewriting for letter-forms— real printing for 
stationery and advertising, saving 25 7. to 75 7. of 
average annual printing cost. American Multigraph 
Sales Company, Ltd., 129 Bay Street, Toronto- 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE — By installing 
an Otis-Fensom handpower elevator you can use 
upper floor as stock room or extra selling space and 
increase space on ground floor. Costs only $70. Write 
catalogue ''B," Otis-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 

EGRY BUSINESS SYSTEMS are devised to suit 
every department of every business. They are 
labor and time savers. Produce results up to the 
requirements of merchants and manufacturers. In- 
quire from our nearest office. Egry Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio; 123 Bay St., Toronto; 258)4 Portage 
Ave. .Winnipeg; 308 Richards St., Vancouver, (tf) 

piRE INSURANCE. INSURE IN THE HART- 
A FORD. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

HUNDREDS OF TYPEWRITERS of every make 
and condition are being traded in as part 
payment on the famous Monarch. Price and 
quality are the levers we use to prevent over stock. 
We believe we can give the best bargains In rebuilt 
typewriters In Canada. A postal will bring our 
catalogue and full information. The monarch Type- 
writer Co., Limited, 46 Adelaide Street West, 
Toronto. 

MODERN FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION. Our 
system of reinforced concrete work — as success- 
fully used in any of Canada's largest buildings — 
gives better results at lower cost. "A strong state- 
ment," you will say. Write us and let us prove our 
claims. That's fair. Leach Conorete Cos, Limited, 
100 King St. West, Toronto. 

MOORE'S NON-LEAKABLE FOUNTAIN PENS. 
If you have Fountain Pen troubles of your own, 
the best remedy is to go to your stationer and 
purchase from him a Moore's Non-Leakable Fountain 
Pen. This !s the one pen that gives universal satis- 
faction and it costs no more than you pay for one not 
as good. Price, $2.50 and upwards. W. J. GAGE 
& CO., Limited, Toronto, sole agents for Canada. 

PENS— The very best pens made are those manu- 
factured by William Mitchell Pens, Limited, 
London, England. W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, 
Toronto, are sole agents for Canada. Ask your sta- 
tioner' for a 25c assorted box of Mitchell's Pens and 
find the pen to suit you. 

THE "KALAMAZOO" LOOSE LEAF BINDER 
holds lust as many sheets as you actually require 
and no more. Back Is flexible, writing surface flat, 
alignment perfect. Cannot get out of order. No 
exposed metal parts or complicated mechanism. 
Write for booklet. Warwick Bros. & Ruttcr, Ltd., 
King and Spadlna, Toronto (tf) 

THE National Cash Register Company guarantee 
to sell a better Register for less money than any 
other bouse on earth. We can prove it. Make us. 
The National Cash Register Co., 285 Yonge Street, 
Toronto 



w 



AREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING SYS- 
TEMS. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by the trade throughout Canada, (tf) 



TET A CONDENSED AD. 
IN THIS PAPER. 



SITUATIONS VACANT 



HARDWARE CLERK. Highest wages to man of 
experience and reliability. T. E. HENDER- 



SHOT, Mount Forest. 



(28) 



w 



ANTED— Hardware clerk, must have experience. 
State salary expected. Apply to John Dufty, 
Broadview, Sask. (30) 



w 



ANTED- Hardware clerk, experienced, good 
stock keeper Give references and state wages. 
Apply to tf. J. HEARD, renelon Falls, Ont. 

(29) 



GOOD position for experienced hardwareman who 
could write advertisements and get up attractive 
circular! and booklets. State fully experience, age 
and salary expected. Will keep strictly confidential. 
Box H, Montreal Que. (tf) 



WANTED— Man capable of doing plumbing and 
tinsmithing. Will pay $25 per week for good 
capable man- Write, giving full particulars, to 
H.W. STOREY, Camrose, Alta. (30) 



WANTED — A reliable, ambitious man In every 
town to look after th* entire circulation of 
our thirteen publications. Work very remun- 
erative. MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY. 
143-149 University Avenue, Toronto, Ont. (tf) 



SITUATIONS VACANT 

WANTED -Salesmen to handle 
A-l side line, paying liberal 
commission ; also paying A-l salary 
as soon as you have shown your 
ability. Wanted only A-l represen- 
tatives to answer this advertise- 
ment. Box 517, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto (24tf) 



HARDWARE SALESMAN 

with Al connection in Great Britain, eoing 
there for six months, wishes to handle Can- 
adian Hardware- 
Address Commission 
c/o HARDWARE & METAL, 
(29) Montreal. 



Nature has solved the 
problem of distribution. 
It uses a multitude of 
agents to effect the distri- 
bution of its products. 

Nature does not expect 
every seed to fall upon fal- 
low ground and to take 
root. But, it achieves a 
profitable percentage upon 
its distribution. This is all 
that an advertiser has to 
do to reap a profitable 
harvest on his outlay. 



70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



fd< 



UMU 



-SPLat 



is a flat-drying oil paint, specially recommended for 
Wall Painting, Woodwork, Furniture, Steel Ceilings, 
Burlap and for all classes of interior decorating. 

It produces that desired dead flat finish, having the 
soft, velvety effect of water color, combined with the 
advantages of being washable and durable as oil paint. 

Easy to apply, sets slowly and covers perfectly 
without showing laps or brush marks. 

Saniflat is unfading and covers fifty per cent, more 
to the gallon than ordinary oil paint. 

Write Us for Details and Prices. 







/ 













Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 

WEST TORONTO 



NEW YORK 



CLEVELAND 



CHICAGO 



tf 



SOME OTHER LEADERS 


IN THE FAMOUS 


MOORE LINE 


ARE:— 


MURESCO 


TILE-LIKE 


IMPERVO FINISHES 


HOUSE COLORS 


MOORAMEL 


FLOOR PAINT 



71 



mm 







mffiffi 



,; ty*} 



WHS 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




gsssssssssssssssssssssssss^^^ssss 



PLYMOUTH ROPE 





Do you wish to please your customers? 

It sometimes takes only a small thing to do it. Try this way: 
simply stock and offer them a thoroughly first-class brand of rope. 
We suggest 

PLYMOUTH ROPE 

I "The Rope You Can Trust" 

PLYMOUTH rope is made in one grade only, and we take 
pride in making that the best in the world. 

PLYMOUTH Manila is what your trade needs for wear and 
long service. It won't wear out like common cheap rope. 

PLYMOUTH Sisal rope is made in the same workmanlike 
manner as PLYMOUTH Manila, and is better than the second- 
quality Manila rope being offered to the trade. 

Write for folder, "The Rope You Can Trust." 
Ask your Jobber for "PLYMOUTH. 

INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., LTD 

Canadian Sales Agents 
55 COLBORNE STREET. TORONTO, ONTARIO 



_ , TORONTO 

Stocks at ST JOHN 



MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



HAUFAX 
VANCOUVER 



;S?x5?^^v5^S^^ 



1 




72 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



e£i 



fJMU 



-^Lat 



is a flat-drying oil paint, specially recommended for 
Wall Painting, Woodwork, Furniture, Steel Ceilings, 
Burlap and for all classes of interior decorating. 

It produces that desired dead flat finish, having the 
soft, velvety effect of water color, combined with the 
advantages of being washable and durable as oil paint. 

Easy to apply, sets slowly and covers perfectly 
without showing laps or brush marks. 

Saniflat is unfading and covers fifty per cent, more 
to the gallon than ordinary oil paint. 




» 



fflm 



'•.^i 



Write Us for Details and Prices. 



Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited 

WEST TORONTO 



NEW YORK 



CLEVELAND 



CHICAGO 



tf! 



jmr 









*$t 



SOME OTHER LEADERS IN THE FAMOUS 
MOORE LINE ARE:— 



MURESCO 

IMPERVO FINISHES 
MOORAMEL 



TILE-LIKE 
HOUSE COLORS 
FLOOR PAINT 



71 




m 



*fr 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SSSSSSSS^SSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSSS^^^^S! 



PLYMOUTH ROPE 




Do you wish to please your customers? 

It sometimes takes only a small thing to do it. Try this way: 
simply stock and offer them a thoroughly first-class brand of rope. 
We suggest 

PLYMOUTH ROPE 

1 "The Rope You Can Trust" 



V 



PLYMOUTH rope is made in one grade only, and we take 
pride in making that the best in the world. 

PLYMOUTH Manila is what your trade needs for wear and 
long service. It won't wear out like common cheap rope. 

PLYMOUTH Sisal rope is made in the same workmanlike 
manner as PLYMOUTH Manila, and is better than the second- 
quality Manila rope being offered to the trade. 

Write for folder, "The Rope You Can Trust." 



Ask your Jobber for <PL Y MOUTH. 




INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., LTD 



Canadian Sales Agents 
55 COLBORNE STREET. TORONTO, ONTARIO 



„ , TORONTO 

.VocAjj at ST JOHN 



MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



HAUFAX 
VANCOUVER 



;SSS5?SS5^?5SS£?S^^ 




HARDWARE AND METAL 





r*it 



^P^ 



An Artistic, Flat, Washable, Wall Finish. 

Is a bonanza for the paint dealer; it opens an entirely new and 
highly profitable field for the paint store. 

The out-of-date custom of finishing walls with Kalsomine or 
Wallpaper leaves little chance for profit to the dealer, in 
« addition the non-permanent qualities of these finishes 
unjustly reflect discredit on the dealer who sells them. 

When a man finishes his walls he expects them to last for . 
sometime ; naturally at the first appearance of spots or mars 
he will censure the dealer. 



If you carry Neu-tone there will be satisfaction resulting from 
each sale when your customers see the ease with which their 
walls can be cleaned with soap and water. It's a big seller, and 
a sure repeater. The profits are steady. 

We have a Neu-tone proposition open for you. Just advise us 
your name and address — we will tell you the rest. 

The Martin-Senour Co., Limited 

Pioneers of Pure Paint 

MONTREAL CHICAGO 



Goods of Quality Will Sell Themselves 



If ever a man has used Dougall varnish he will ask for that brand when- 
ever he needs varnish again. 

If you sold him the first Dougall varnish that he used it will be to you that 
he comes with his repeat orders. 

Why not recommend Dougall varnish? There is no varnish in the market 
that can give the same satisfaction. Our plant is thoroughly up-to-date ; 
our workmen are the most experienced that it is possible to obtain ; and 
our method of manufacture is second to none. 

Don't recommend a cheap varnish that will crack and peel off after a short 
space of time. Recommend Dougall's and win the goodwill of your customers. 

THE DOUGALL VARNISH COMPANY, LIMITED 

J. S. N. DOUGALL, President 

MONTREAL - CANADA 

Associated with Murphy Varnish Co., U.S.A. 

"THE VARNISH THAT LASTS LONGEST' 



73 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Roofing 

Made for Canadian Climate 

From Trinidad Asphalt 

WILL LAST FOR YEARS IN ANY WEATHER 

Canadian Supply Go. 

Roofers' Supplies 
220 KING STREET WEST 

TORONTO 

AGENTS WANTED. 



British Manufacture Throughout. 

The Fyrout Fire Extinguisher 



Simple ! 
Durable! 
Effective ! 
Portable ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 



Application i 




Will 

Extinguish 

Any Kind 

of Fire ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 

Application 



There is no cure for fire — 

Only Prevention 

Pull Descriptive List will be sent on application to 

The Valor Company, Limited 

Aston Cross, Birmingham, England 

Or-GEO. H. SAYWELL, SASKATOON 



Build up a trade on the 

repeat order basis by 

recommending 

"International' 
Varnish 
Products 

A majority of Hardware Dealers are doing that. 

Don't take it on our say-so, but investigate for 
yourself. 

And you will find out that a big percentage of 
Canadian Hardware Merchants feature " Inter- 
national" Products. 



There are more than a Jew reasons why they 
should. Take 



ELASTICA 



for instance — the floor finish that's practically 
imperishable. The only truly elastic finish on 
the market — the finish that wears like nic kel 
steel. 

Elastica does not mar, scratch, white or spot. 
It dries dust free in four to six hours and 
hardens over night. 

Elastica Nos. 1 and 2 are used for Exterior and 
Interior work respectively. 

Let us know your varnish and finish require- 
ments and we'll give you solid reasons why you 
should always specify International Products. 

All International Products are sold 
in full Imperial Measure Cans. 




TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 

A24 



74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This 

Trade Mark 

Ensures 

Genuineness 

Originality 

Perfection 

Satisfaction 



OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery, 6d. 
and is. Canister*. 

' WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, Limited 

Macrafectttrers of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass 
and Flint C loths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 





THE EXHIBITION TRIP 

will not be complete without a visit to our new 
plant. The largest, best equipped and most 
up-to-date in Western Canada. 



Take a St. Boniface car to the end of the 
line. Turn to your right and you will find us. 

See our Exhibit |at the grounds in the South 
Industrial Building. 

WINNIPEG CEILING & ROOFING CO. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 




NEW ERA 

PAINT 

Always Gives Satisfaction. 

The large demand for New Era Paint is the result of its 
high quality. 

It is unequalled as a surface-coverer. 

It is in good condition when sold, and it stays in good 
condition — that is why it is so popular with both the 
retailer and his customer. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Works Co. 



WINDSOR 



LIMITED 



ONTARIO 



Carbon Black Elastic Paint 

A SPECIAL ROOF PAINT 
LEAK PROOF AND FIRE RETARDENT 

Can be put on Felt, Tar-paper, Gunnysack. Shingles, Metal or any other material. 

Will not Crack in Winter or Melt in Summer. 

A most popular article that shows good profits to the merchant. 

Write and we will Bend our traveller. 

Stocks on hand at Calgary, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto. 

The Carbon Oil Works, Ltd. 



WINNIPEG 



HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG, CANADA 

Manufacturers of C.O.W.L. BRAND Paints, Stains, 

Wax Oils, and Oils -of -Tar, Specialties, etc. 



CANADA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





Leran wisdom by 
the follies 
of others. 



Many dealer*, dazzled by the pro- 
spect of a big first profit, recommend a 
certain article regardless aeto whether 
or not that article will give a customer 
the greatest possible satisfaction. 

This shortsightedness has proved 
fatal to many a dealer. Unless a 
customer Is thoroughly satisfied, your 
chancesfor his future trade ar* small ; 
but the greater his satisfaction the surer 
you are of his steady trade. 

It"s the cumulative value of a sale 
that counts — that's why 

It pays to sell the FORD 

Auger Bit in preference to all others. 
It gives MAXIMUM satisfaction every 
time in every way. Your profit may 
not be quite as large on the first sale — 

but Sure repeat sales win 

boost the total profit away over and 
above that obtained by "One-time 
large profit" sales. 

If you, Mr. Dealer, are following 
on this latter plan in your Auger Bit 
trade, just try pushing the FORD, and 
note carefully the result. It will con- 
vert the occasional buyer into a steady 
customer and make every buyera satis- 
fied customer. 

Dealers who have tried this know It 
to be a fact. Will you be the next ? 

Write im for catalog aad circulars. 

Ford Anger Bit Co. 

HOLYOKE MASS. 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLACE 

NEW YORK CITY 



-PUMPS- 

All Hinds 

Hay Unloading Tools. 
Darn Door Hangers. 

The word "MYERS"' assures 
QUALITY. Better write to us. 

F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND, OHIO 

J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary and Branch Houses 



- THE WANT AD. - 

The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the "want ad" as a matter of 
course for a hundred small ser- 
vices. 

The want ad. gets work for 
workers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and 
finds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The "want ad." is the great 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of daily life. 



ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 



BRASS RAILINGS 



MADE TO 
ORDER 



THE BOOTH-COULTER COPPER & BRASS CO., LIMITED 

Coppersmiths and Brass Founders, : : : : TORONTO, ONT. 




SEYMOUR SHEARS 

Have been the Standard for over seventy years 
"OUALITY UNQUESTIONED" 

Etch pair of oar shears btars the abov. trade mark 



SEYMOUR 

SMtAR CO. 



[TRADE MARK 




Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS' 
BARBERS' and TAILORS' SHEARS, etc., etc. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY 



Lateal catalog 
will be eent in 
exchaoge (or 

your busier ss 
card. 



WIEBUSCH & HIL8ER, LIMITED NEW YORK, Agent* 



CARRIAGE 
SPRINGS & AXLES 

ANCHOR 




THE CUELPH SPRING A AXLE CO. 

LIMIT!! 
CUELPH, ONT. 



TWO CENTS PER WORD 

You can talk across the continent for two cents 
per word with a WANT AD. in this paper. 



HAKDWARE AND METAL 

GAS TOASTERS 

The "GYPSY" Gas Toaster lies flat on top of a gas, 
gasoline, oil or coal stove, and toasts QUICKLY and 
PERFECTLY. Perforated steel plate, and heavy cross- 
woven coppered wires. Size 9x9 inches. Wrapped £ 
dozen in a bundle. 

The "WILSON" Gas Toaster is unequalled in the 
pyramid class. Toasts four slices at once, and heats a 
vessel on top at the same time. May be used on any stove. 

A cheaper imitation of the "WILSON" is also sup- 
plied by us under the name of "KNOBLOCK." 

Special Price* Quoted on Quantities. 

Manufactured by 

E,. T. WRIGHT &t CO., Hamilton, Canada 





(H. G. WRIGHT) 

Winnipeg agents, Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Man.; 
Toronto agent, F B. Wilson, 33 Maitland St., Toronto, Ont. 



Vancouver agents, Macpherson & Teetzel, Vancouver, B.C.; 
Winnipeg agents, W. Reynolds & Co., Winnipeg, Man 



MAPLE LEAF 

11 Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 




This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the wide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF" 

Shurly-Dietrich Co., Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO 



and 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 



Maximum 

Range 
1,700 Feet 



A Wonderful Long Range Pistol 

The "Bayard" Self Loading 
Pistol .38 Calibre 




Penetration 

6 Pine 
Boards 
at 50 Yards 

Adopted by 

Spanish 

Army 



Better balanced than other pistols, as magazine 
is in front of trigger guard, consequently more 
accurate. Visible safety lever, visible hammer, 

user always knows when his pistol is ready for action, or safe. Length of pistol 
over all, 10 inches; weight, 2 1/5 lbs.; initial velocity of bullet, 1,181 feet. The sim- 
plest, safest and strongest Automatic Pistol on the market. Its accuracy, its 
penetration and especially its stopping power (energy) are unsurpassed. Fine 
blued finish, packed in neat leatherette case. 

FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES 

77 



PT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ORNAMENTAL/— |^f 
IRONWORK 




JK :i 



WIRE GOODS 

PERFORATED METALS 
GENUINE ANTIQUE 
BRONZE FLY SCREEN CLOTH 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co. 

HAMILTON. ONT. 



®A*sG>AbA K^KCKgKfa) 




A Durable, Heavy Steel HOG 
TROUGH That Sells Quickly 

Introduce this 
high grade Hog 
Trough to your 
farm trade and it's 
sure to increase 
your business, 
ik.as it is made from sel- 
nd is absolutely rivetless. 
lengths from 4 to 12 feet 
and make odd lengths to fit any pen to order. 
Write for special prices 

ERIE IRON WORKS, Ltd., ^bSSSSo^' 




All Chance! 




From the old-fashioned polishes and use 

POLIVIT 

The Lightning Silver Cleaner 

No more wasted hours rubbing away with trouble- 
some powders, pastes and brushes. Place Polivit in 
water with washing Soda, and the dirt flies from 
the silver to Polivit. 

Write for pamphlets and price* 

A. A. SHUTE, 

FREDERICTON, N.B. 

Sole agent for Canada 

Be sure and stock Polivit 




Manufacturers of Rules, Levels, Planes. 
.Gauges. Hand Screws. Etc. 



THE QHAPIN-StEPHENS C°- 



UNION """ FACTORY 

PINE MEADOW, CONN.. U.S.A. 



The EUREKA 



is the be»t tool for digging post holes 
any size. Also for sinking posts 
heaved by frost. It c ts off roots — 
lifts out stones, etc —works in sand, 
clay, gravel or muck. If your jobber 
will not supply them, write us. 

We also make Wire Stretchers for 
building Wire Fences, Drive Well 
Points, Drive Caps, Shoes, Cylinders 
and Pumps. 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Limited 

OTTERVILLE. - ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Special Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Accurately Machined 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



NIONTRBAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITED 

HEAD OFFICES 

TORONTO 

CANADA 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 
ROSSLANO 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. limited 

Avoid imitations of our -<CRED TRAD/? . 



CUTLERY 



<P 



** 



w * 



By seeing that this exact 

mark is on each blade. ^T>4AiTrr> \fe^ 

SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton £& Company 

MONTREAL 



A Strong Selling Point 





This combination Nut end Pipe Wrench has a 
Kjf " mw very strong selling point— Double Efficiency 

Its handiness and strength at once appeal to the good mechanic to 
save him time and trouble. You can sell a lot of these Wrenches- 
make a start by writing to-day for our catalog. 

BEMIS & CALL HARDWARE & TOOL CO. 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 




78 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Jonathan Crookes & Son 

Sheffield, England 
Corporate Mark 

Granted 1780. 





Supreme Cutlery 

FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HOUSES 



ANYONE CAN USE 
THE "SPECIAL" SAW 




FULLY WARRANTED 
THAT - S WHY THEY ARE THE FAVORITE WITH THE CAR- 
PENTERS AND AMATEURS 

SEND US A SMALL TRIAL ORDER AND SEE HOW THEY GO v 

CHAS. MORRILL, 271 Broadway, NEW YORK, U.S.A. 



WOOD SCREWS 




The 20th Century 

Patent Socket Head Screws Drive Easier, 

Drive Quicker, Never Slip Driver- 
Send us an 0/ rfer and give them a trial. 

RIVETS, BURRS, WASHERS 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

P. L Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton. Ont. 



BRASS ROD 

Prompt delivery from stock 



i-i^vrviiL-rrorsi , on 



Clues, Gelatines, Size, Etc. 

Quality counts in these lines, as in 
others. Fifty years' experience 
enables us to offer goods that for 
QUALITY and VALUE 

cannot be excelled. 

Supplied through Merchants, Jobbers, etc., only. 

THE GROVE CHEMICAL CO., LTD. 

Established 1859 Appley Bridge, Wig»n, Lanes, England 



WALL PLASTER 

THE "EMPIRE" BRANDS MANU- 
FACTURED ONLY BY 

The Manitoba Gypsum Co. 

LIMITED 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 




EAVETROUGH and 

CONDUCTOR 

PIPE THAT DO 

NOT FIT 

TOGETHER 

EASILY ARE 

DEAR AT ANY 

PRICE. 



Ours are noted for their uniformity and the ease with which they 
can be put up on the job. Other well-known lines of ours are 
Ventilators, Skylights, Ridge Roll, Valleys, Elbows and 

CORRUGATED IRON 




WHEN IN A HURRY 
ORDER FROM US 

Wheeler 
& Bain 

THE OUICK SHIPPERS 

Toronto, Canada. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost daily, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, munufacturers and retail dealers, who usually intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure the information at once. This page enables manu- 
facturers to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS. 



Battery Zinc*, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

The CANADA METAL CO., LTD , 
31 William St., Toronto 



BOLTS. 



Carriage Bolts, Machine Bolts, Coach 
Screws, S. & S. Hinges, Cross Arm 
Braces and Pins, Pole Steps, Nuts, etc. 
Plain and galvanized. Ask for prices. 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 

London, Canada 



BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Ball Phone SOU P. O. Box 167 

Bosse CSl Banks 

Steal Beams, Column*. Plate*. Gaa and 

Water Pipes. Contractors'. Municipal 

and Builders' Supplies. Machinery 

and Specialties. 

Board of Trade Building 

39 St. Paul St., - QUEBEC 



OHAPLETS. 




ERIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

All Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S. Cheney & Son, Manlius.N.Y. 



0LTPP2S£ 



FRIEST'S CLIPPEK&i f 

THAT'S 
SUFFICIENT, 




sto mm 



i ix>* catalogue 
iaurfraa Saearsr SUk. to.. Hasana, « D,TJ54 

Wsboah & Hilger, limited, special New York 
RepreaentatiTea. 1Q6-110 Lafayette Street 



EMERY WHEELS. 




Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

443 Barton St. East, Hamilton 

Corundum and Emery Wheels 

Grinding- Machln**, Bearer 

Oil Sionss. 



FIRE BRICK. 



Silica Bricks, Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
Silica Cement, Ganister Composition 

For material graded to withstand the in- 
tensest heat or moderate heat, apply to 

A. Y. DINAS SILICA BRICK & LIME CO.. LTD. 
118, Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland 



FILTERS. 



f^LVO FILTER a STERILIZER 




/JTl. 

I JT kills oil disease gtrm» by 
*}*# Electricity- Plain or Strew 
Faucers 50 and 75 

WriU for Dockirj 

Seyorts on rhf 
*Cqlvo" 



SPLASH" 

FILTERS Main or Sctet/ 

Faucet. £5c Writ h, d,«±j. 



Anti Splash Rller.Cp 

Owen Sound 



FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Beat Door Closer la 

Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

Will olose a door silently against any pressure of wind 
Has many working advantages oyer the ordinary spring 
aad has twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
and *be colonies. Gives perfeotBaUsfaotian. Made only by 

W. NBWMAN ft BOMS 
Hospital St .... Birmingham 



GAS CONTROLLERS. 



WRITE FOR NEW PRICES 
ON GAS CONTROLLERS 
Canadian Gas Users' 

Association 
633-635 Queen Street W. 
TORONTO 
Eastern Repre — J. S. Mullen, 
1749 Park Ave. , Montreal, Que. 
Western Repre.— The Moffat 
Stove Co., Ltd., 248 Princess 
Street, Winnipeg, Man. 




HORSE POKES. 




Our Surprise Horse 
and Cattle Halter 
Pokes are the best. 

Manufactured by 

James & Reid 

Parth, Ont. 



IRON. 


PIG 


IRON 


STEEL PLATES, 


BARS and ANGLES 


BAR 


IRON 


David C. Mitchell & Co. 


118 Queen St. - 


Glasgow, Scotland 



LAMP BLACK. 



L. MARTI/HCOIYIPANY 

,- worlds largest manufacturers i>f 

its' reputation behind every package. 
,.i4»r-i,a*ead>ertisemeiit auiieuririB-evyry 



C'2 years' reputation Litrima en 
ee our nuurter-pttg* advertisement 

alternate issue of " liardvvSM 



alternate issue of " Hardware £ Mela.. 
H«w York Philadelphia Cincinnati London, Eng. 



MALLEABLE IRON. 



Malleable Iron Castings 

Carriage and Agricultural Castings, 
Axle Nuts, etc, etc 

Manufactured by 

P. ftYLE, MerrickvilU, Ontario 

Catalogue furnished on application 



MANUFACTURERS* AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 

Wholesale Commission Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Agents. Cars Distribut- 
ed, Warehoused and Forwarded. Ware- 
house on Transfer Track. Business 
solicited. 

OUR POSITION IS TOUR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 
SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA. 



MOOSE JAW 

Whitlock <& Marlatt 

Distributing and Forwarding Agents 

Warehouse on C.P.R.spur track 

PBOHPTNESS and SATISFACTION GUAIANTUD 

Buxlnomm Solicited. 



JAS. BISSET & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 
260 St. Paul St., QUEBEC, QUE. 

Cars distributed, warehoused and 
forwarded. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED. 



ALEXANDER QIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
18 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing < anadian, British and Am 
Manufacturer*. Correspondence invited 
firms wishing to be represented. 



80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLOW CASTINGS. 



Castings of all Kinds. 

Write us for our list of 
Plow Castings. 

The Hilborn Co., Ayr, Ontario. 



RIVETS Am) STEEL FRODUOTS. 



The PABMENTEB BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 

OANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iran sad Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, [ 
Blfurettsd and Tubular Rlrets, Wire Nails, 
Coppsr and Steel Boat and Canoe Nslls, 
Batatshson Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Basklss, Felloe Plates. 



SHELF BRACKETS. 
Will Hold Up a Shelf 

That's what a shelf brac- 
ket's for. For this pur- 
pose there can be Nothing 
Nothing Cheaper than the 
Bradley Steel Bracket. It is well 
Japanned, Strong and Light. The 
saving on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which 
the goods are sold. Order direct or 
through your Jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., NEW HAVEN 




Better, 



SPRAYERS. 



ft 



Sprayers 



n 



Our 1911 Sprayers are better than ever, 
four different kinds this year, to suit all 
tastes and purposes. You ought to see our 
new whirlwind or continuous sprayer, it's 
a comer. A post card will bring a cata- 
logue. Manufactured by 
THE COLLINS MFG. CO. - TORONTO 



STANCHIONS 



O K CANADIAN U BAR STEEL 

Stanchions and Stalls 

are guaranteed not to let the cattle _ 
loose, and are absolutely sanitary. * 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co., Limited 



208 Stone Road 



Gait. Out. 



TIMBER JACKS. 



TKEWHELLA BROS. 

AUSTRALIAN MONKEY JACKS 

for clearing land of TREES, ROOTS and STUMPS 

They are aim pie, powerful, 
reliable, ex i editions A 
necessary tool for eyery 
farmer. 

TREWHELLA BROS 

•< - v TZr*tzr^^^r m ~ 9 Alma Street, Smethwick, 
Birmingham, Eng., and Trentham Victoria, Aust 




TOOL HOLDERS. 

TOOL HOLDERS 

For LATHES and PLANERS 

All kinds— All sizes. 

ARM8TR0NC BROS. TOOL CO. 

fM , i -- 106 N. Francisco Ave. 

OME POUND <& CH,0 * C0 ' "•*• 

of TOOL STEEL 
EQUAL 10 LBS. 
in FORGED tools. 

Write for Catalog. 






TRUCKS 

Watson's Trucks 

Every Factory, Mill, Whole- 
sale or Retail Store and 
Warehouse in your locality 
requires Trucks. 
We make Trucks for every 
purpose. Catalogue and Prices 
for the asking. 

John Watson Mfg. Co., Limited, 

Ayr, Ont. Winnipeg, Man. 



WIRE SPRINGS. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 

WIRE SPRINGS 

for COMPRESSION and EXTENSION 

James Steele, Limited, Guelph 



Keep in mind the domin- 
ant fact that mankind from 
its first appearance on the 
earth has been schooled by 
nature to look for signs ; 
for invitations to taste; for 
suggestions as to what to 
wear. Tell your story 
briefly, forcibly, truthful- 
ly, and address it through 
the proper media and you 
can successfully apply ad- 
vertising as a means to 
increased distribution. 



MOP- STICKS 

= OF DURABILITY = 

are the "TARBOX BRAND" 

No. 8 Plain Cloth Holder. 

No. 10 Combination Brush 
Specify through your Jobber along 
with Self-wringing and Crank-wring- 
ing Mops. Manufactured by 

TARBOX BROS., ■ Toronto, Ontario 



When writing advertisers kindly men- 
tion having seen the advertisement in 
this paper. 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 

6 COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 

Just the Tool for Inexperienced Glass Cutters 




Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 

Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained in a great variety of patterns from Dealers in 
Glass, Hardware and Painters' Supplies. 

GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK F ^ a ^L n s g Wood0n p/clfets on 

.FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



London, Ont. 



Two Cents per Word 



You can talk across the continent for 
two cents per word in a Hardware and 
Metal Want Ad. 



81 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



High Grade Electro Silver-plated 

Spoon 

of 
Durability 

afford you some conception of the choice lines that we manu- 
facture. Every dealer is authorized to make good our guarantee, therefore he runs no risk. 
Write for catalogue and prices. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls, Ont. 

AGF.NTS: J Mackay Rose. 88 McGiil St.. Montreal : N. F. GUNDY. 61 Albert St., Toronto: David Philip. 291 Portage Ave., Winnipeg 




BUTTERMAKERS DEMAND 

THE "FAVORITE" CHURN 

because they know it is the best. A glance at its construction — that light, but 
rigid angle steel frame, the bolted trunnions, the tight and conveniently arranged 
cover, the combined hand and foot drive, the roller bearings — these very 
evident advantages convince one of its superiority, which is fully proven by 
actual churning tests. As a natural result, more "FAVORITES" are sold in 
Canada than all other churns combined. 8 sizes, to churn from J to 30 gallons. 

David Maxwell ®, Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 




Make Money From Good 
Pumps —Profit 

Unless a metal pump is made just 
right it will leak at joints or valves. 

" Aremacdee " pumps do not give 
dealers who sell them 
trouble and loss from 
defective service in 
Aremacdee " pumps 
sold customers. 

Pumps for every 
use— hand or motor- 
force or lift — every 
type a dealer can sell. 

All in the big catalogue. Ask for it— 
for dealer prices— for dealer terms. 

The R. McDOUGALL GO., Limited 

CALT, CANADA 



82 





The Aylmer 
Windmill 
Force Pump 



Mr. Dealer : It will pay you 
; ^A to write for our illustrated 

^^^ ^ Catalogues of Double and 
Single Acting Force and Lift, Hand, 
Windmill and Power Pumps; Hay, Stock, 
Portable Platform, Union, Dairy and 
Butcher Scales. Goods right and prices 
are right. 

The Aylmer Pump & Scale Go, Limited 

AYLMER, : ONTARIO 

WESTERN REPRESENTATIVES : 

The Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., Limited 

WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BANNER 



GOLD 
BLAST 



LANTERN 



N 
O 
T 
E 

T 
H 
E 

P 

O 

I 

N 




YOU GET VALUE IN 

WORKMANSHIP 

MATERIAL 

AND 

DESIGN 

THAT MEANS . 
SATISFIED 

CUSTOMERS 



ASK YOUR JOBBER 



HE HAS THEM 



Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 



B 
O 
O 
S 
T 

T 
H 
E 

S 
A 
L 
E 



A Guarantee of Absolute Quality Perfection 

is possible in our product, to the exclusion of other makes, by the fact that in 
our chain the weld is actually the strongest part of the link. 



The swell 

guarantees 

the weld. 




The swell 

guarantees 

the weld. 



The chain illustrated above was pulled perfectly rigid with a stock break, after which the 
welds were hammered flat in an endeavour to part the welds or show any defects. 



Office: 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



McKinnon Chain Co. 



Factory t 
ST. CATHARINES, ONT. 



r^ MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO. 
PITTSBURG, PA. 
Manufacturers of 
COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 

For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kinds of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON AND STEEL 

Bars, Hoops, Angles, Beams, Channels, etc. 

Galvanized and Black Sheets, all grades. 

Tinplates Canada Plates 

METALS 

Antimony, Copper, Tin, Lead, Zinc. 

PIG IRON 



M. ®> L. Samuel, Benjamin ®> Co 



Corner King Street and Spodina Avenue 

Toronto 




"National" Steel Rim 

LOCK 

STRONGEST AND SAFEST 

Made of the highest quality 
steel, the "National" is the 
most durable rim lock made 
and is the lock which per- 
fectly satisfies modern re- 
quirements. 



Write us for 
particulars 
and prices. 

NATIONAL 
HARDWARE 
CO., Limited 

ORILLIA. ONT., 
CANADA. 




Our High-Class Urns 

Bring 

High-Class 

Trade 

TO 



Restaurants, Hotels, 
and Cafes. The many re- 
orders we receive prove 
our customers' sat- 
isfaction. The Urns we 
sell are thoroughly 
efficient and reliable, 
being of the latest pat- 
tern and most skilled 
workmanship. Let us 
have your enquiry at 
once. We will give 
you the fullest infor- 
mation. 

THE BUFFALO 
MFG. CO., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives 

H. F. Mcintosh & Co.. 
28 Toronto St., Toronto 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

Pink's 
Lumbering 

Tools 

Made in Canada 

The Standard! Tools 
in every province 
of the Dominion, 
New Zealand, 
Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all 
kinds of lumber 
tools. 

Light and Durable 

Send for catalogue 

and price list. 

Long Distance 

Phone No. 87 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 





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" W. & B. Diamond " Twist Drills 




Trada 



O 



Mark 



We carry the largest stock of all standard sizes 
of Twist Drills in Canada, and make shipment 
same day order is received. 

Send your orders to us and you will not be 
troubled with Customs or Brokerage Fees. 



Trade 

wsb 

Mark 




Highest Quality Guaranteed 

The Whitman & Barnes Mfg. Co. 

ST. CATHARINES, ONTARIO 

85 



HARDWA R E AND METAL 




Profitable Saws 

We offer the ambitious merchant the most profitable Saw proposi- 
tion in the world. Ours is not a campaign with the object of 
securing your order at any cost or by any means 

A SELLING PLAN 

But is a carefully worked out plan whereby we work together to 
build business for each other. It's co-operative and profitable 
"We help You to Sell" and then we expect re-orders. Write us 
for full information. 



We make Hand Wood, Panel, Rip and Small Saws, Cross-Cuts 
Metal Saws. A Perfect Saw for Every Purpose. No I90 




E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 

TJrt *-„ : 1 4- ~ * O O t MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 

XXdUlllLOIl, Will. U.S Factory, Indianapolis, Ind 



WHEELBARROWS 

for Every Purpose 

We have so many different styles — Bar- 
rows for Railroad or Canal Construc- 
tion, Garden and Farm, Stone, Metal, 
Mortar, Contractors', Concrete, Etc, Etc. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 
THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD. 

London - Canada 
Toronto Warehouse, 1 9 Jarvis St., F. J. Schuch, Agen 




Have the Agency O * 1 " Crescent jO /^i ■ O 

bimonds Ground- Lross-Lut oaws 



in Your Town for the 




Nmifmrn^wMm* 



It will mean a good seller for you. The Saws can be purchased through your jobber or from any of our 
offices. Good profit and quick sales. You are at liberty to guarantee Simonds "Crescent Ground" Cross- 
Cut Saws to cut 10 per cent, more timber, same time and labor being used, than any other Cross-Cut Saw 
in the world. 

SIMONDS CANADA SAW CO., Limited, Montreal, P.Q. St. John,N.B. Vancouver, B.C. 

86 



HARD W ARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




GOIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, STEAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 

EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 

Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents : ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL 



Get Our Prices and Get to Thinking, That is All We Ask 

TH IS MANTEL 

Is Artistic, Ornamental and Substantial. 90 other designs of 
the same quality. Gas and Coal Grates and Fireplace Fittings, 
also a complete line of Gas and Electric Fixtures. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 
Test us, every test is one more triumph. 

OUR TRADE EXTENDS FROM COAST TO COAST 

The Barton Netting Company, Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 




THE CONNOR BALL-BEARING WASHER 

With the hinged 
cover now used 
on this Washer 
it is no longer 
necessary for 
the operator to 
place the cover 
and rubbing 
board dripping 
wet onto the 
kitchen floor. 
With this hing- 
ed rubber and 
cover the water 
drips back into 
the machine. It 
is easily han- 
dled. And other 
features of this 
machine are a 
detachable tub; 
no iron running 
through the bot- 
tom of the tub ; 
Cypress Tubs: 
nicely finished 
Ball • Bearings 
and Motor Springs do most of the work. 

Have you the agency for this washer? If not, write at 
once for sample, prices, terms, etc. You will find it the 
most satisfactory machine you ever handled. 




J. H. CONNOR & SON, LTD., 

Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Agent* for Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta. Geo. D. Horsman, 818 Granville St., Vancouver, Agent for 
British Columbia. 



UanafictBrers. 
OTTAWA 



FIX UP YOUR CHIMNEYS 



Even the best stove or furnace will be unsatisfactory if the 
chimney does not draw well. But the 



tt 



Zephyr Ventilator 



tf 



will give a good draft to any chimney. It will even allow the 
burning of soft coal in the stove, with good results. 
We want you to sell the "Zephyr 

Ventilator" in your town. There is 
money in it, and the satisfaction that 
it gives will bring you new custom- 
ers. The "Zephyr" cannot be 
excelled for ventilating the rooms 

of Clubs, 8team Laundries, etc. 
The "Zephyr" makes high ohim- 
neys unnecessary. 

Brockville, Ont.. Jan 23rd, 1909 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

129 Sanguinet St.. Montreal 
Dear Sirs • 

Enclosed you will find my cheque 
to cover account for the last of the many 
of your "J. W. Harris Rotary Vent- 
ilators." which I have installed here, 
and I have much pleasure in saying that 
in every case they have given perfect 
satisfaction. 

Yours truly, 

W. H. Harrison. 

Made by 

The J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

Contractors 

Montrea I 




87 



, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Not Yet— But Soon 

One hates to mention Autumn when the crops are only sprout- 
ing, but nevertheless NOW is the time to order your supply of 

"ROSS" RIFLES 

Display them in your window and secure the "early trade,' 
which even now is preparing for the fall Big Game. 

Discounts and full information on request. 

The Ross Rifle Co., Quebec, P.Q. 



THE RIGHT LINE 



TRADE 




Registered 



MARK 



CAN it be that your next door neighbour is 
reaping a larger profit on his shovel sales ? Can 
it be that you are buying wrong ? 

fl Let us put you on to the "right line" at the 
"right price"— the "BARGAIN LINE." 

CJ We manufacture every class of shovel, spade 
or scoop known to the trade, and have developed 
what we believe is a perfect Snow or General 
Purpose Shovel. Quality, stability, appearance — 
all are there. 

<I May we convince you ? 

The Lundy Shovel and Tool Company, Limited 

General Offices and Factory, PETERBOROUGH, and at 
MONTREAL WINNIPEG JOHANNESBURG, S.A. 



88 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Uniformity of Quality 
Prompt Delivery 

Adaptability 
Standard Weight 

Points to remember in connec- 
tion with Canada Cement when 
making - specifications. 

Canada Cement Co. 

Limited 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY 



CHICAGO 
If K HH1 w 




A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

Combining all the valuable features which experience 
has demonstrated to be desirable. 



Chicago Sprite ^uttffompinjg. 



CHICAGO 




NEW YORK 



Send for CaUlosiM M 16 






Salem 



Kingston 



Morrow 



"New Designs" 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. TuTL 
PETERBOROUGH ONTARIO 







Irwin 



Avon 



Stratton 



"New Designs" 

See Our 1911 Supplement 

CANADA 



mmssm 



/(/fiKZAf Measuring Tapes 

are to-day recognized as the Standards of Accuracy, Design 
and Workmanship. Each is made to sustain the Reputation 
gained by a Quarter Century's endeavor. Used by all experi- 
enced consumers. The wise merchant has them for sale. 



sold by all jobbers 7H E /l/FKFN Rj/LE (?Q. OF (?ANADA*lrJX. 

W/NDSOfcONT. 



SEND FOR CATALOGUE 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Eat. 1868 




Inc. 1895. 



Black Diamond File Works 



(*> 



G. & H. Barnett Co. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve . Q t>e i ^iW^!w MedaU 







Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 



Copy of cata- 
logue seat free 
to any inter- 
ested file user 
apon applica- 
tion. 



Gold Medal at Atlanta, 189S 




F. B. & W. Goods 

Genuine Red Lead 
Ground Litharge 
Flake Litharge 
OrangeJ [Mineral 
White Lead Ground In Oil 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Co. 



LIMITED 



MONTREAL 



GOLD MEDAL 
WORLDS EXPOSITION, BRUSSELS, 1910 




VALVE DISCS 




"PRACTICALLY INDESTRUCTIBLE" 

For long and satisfactory service, 

nothing to equal them has 

ever been made. 



Manufactured solely by 



THE CUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFC. CO. 

OP TORONTO, LIMITED 
Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 




Farm Special Outfit 



The Big Selling 
Tool Grinder for 
Farm and Shop 

No price-cutting competition on this 
patented grinder. The retail price is 
established and maintained. Equipped 
with genuine Carborundum wheels and 
pays for itself by saving time and tools, 
and makes all work easier. Liberal pro- 
fits, big seller to farmers, shops, mechan- 
ics, carpenters, contractors, etc. 

LUTHER TOOL GRINDERS 

25 times faster than Grindstones 
6 times faster than Emery Wheels 

No need of cooling with water, no danger 
of drawing temper from tools. Built like 
a high-grade lathe, hand and foot power. 

35 Styles, with Attachments 

A style for every use— -special attachments 
enable inexperienced persons to sharpen 
chisels, twist drills, discs, saws, etc. 
Our special sales method gets quick action 
for the dealer — quick sales and liberal pro- 
fits. Write for full information to-day. 

LUTHER GRINDER MFG. CO. 

1196 Madison St.. Milwaukee, Wis. 




HAKDWAKE-METAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Montreal i 701-702 Eastern Townships Bank Bids. Toronto : 14J-I4* University Ave. Winnipeg: 34 Royal Bans. Bld« 

New York: 115 Broadway. London. En*.: H Fleet SU E.C. 



VOL. XX II. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE : TORONTO, JULY 22, 1911 



NO 29 




CARVERS 
CASED GOODS 
TABLE CUTLERY 



BUTCHERS 
HUNTING 5. 
POCKET KNIVES 



For Sale by Leading Wholesale Houses. 





"Globe" 



BLACK SHEETS 



Excellent for general work 



John Lysaght, Limited 

Makers • 

Bristol, Newport and Montreal 



A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 

Montreal 
Managers Canadian Branch 



The "TAYLOR-FORBES" 

WESTERN TOOL GRINDER 

Is Noiseless, Efficient and Economical 



In it friction is reduced to a minimum, the machine 
being the lightest run and the longest lived on the 
market. It has cut gears encased and the wheel is a 
corundum grinder 7x1. The machine is chainless 
and dirtless and every part of it is made of the finest 
iron. Western tool grinders weigh only 20 lbs. and 
are packed one in a box. 

Your enquiry will receive our prompt attention. 

Taylor' Forbes Co., Ltd. 



Gue/ph, 



Ontario 



REPRESENTED BY:-Taylor-Forbes Co., Ltd.. 246 Craig St. W., MonticE!: 
H. G. Rogers— S3KDock Street, St. John, N.B ; W. A. MacLennan— Vancouver, 
B.C.; J. B. H. Rickaby— Victoria. B C ; H. F. Moolden & Son— Travellers' 
Building, Winnipeg. Canadian United Mfrs. Agency, London, Eng. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



There's Something More Than Profit 
In the Sale of a GILLETTE 



Time was when a good many dealers judged a sale wholly by the 
immediate profit. Now they look much deeper into it. 

An honest sale at a satisfactory profit is always good. 

A sale that pleases the customer more than he anticipated is better, for 
to the profit is added his good-will. 

But the sale that, in addition, brings the customer back for more, is best 
of all. 

That's a GILLETTE sale. 

The GILLETTE Safety Razor certainly does please buyers, for it gives 
them quicker, cleaner, smoother shaves than they ever thought possible. It 
pleases them so well that they enthusiastically recommend it to their friends, and 
so pave the way for more business for you. Their satisfaction with the razor is, 
to a certain extent, credited to you, and you gain their good-will. 

There"are some lines of foreign manufacture, unadvertised, unknown, of 
most uncertain quality, of which this can scarcely be said. 

More than that, each GILLETTE sale 
starts an annuity for you, for each man who 
buys a razor will come back to you for blades. 
Every time he drops in you have an opportun- 
ity to sell him perhaps several times 
the amount of the blade sale in other 
lines, and to strengthen your hold on, 
his business. 

These are some of the reasons 
why it does not take the clear 
thinking, far-sighted merch- 
ant long to decide which razor 
it's best to handle for perman- 
ent business and satisfaction 



THE GILLETTE SAFETY 

RAZOR CO. OP CANADA, 

LIMITED 

Office and Factory : 

63 St. Alexander St., MONTREAL. 




KNOWN THE 



WORLD OVER 



HARDWARE AND METAI 



British Manufacture Throughout. 

The "Fy rout Fire Extinguisher 



Simple ! 
Durable! 
Effective ! 
Portable ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 

Application 




Will 

Extinguish 

Any Kind 

of Fire ! 

Special 

Prices 

on 

Application 



There is no cure for fire — 

Only Prevention 

Pull Descriptive List will be sent on application to 

The Valor Company, Limited 

Aston Cross, Birmingham, England 

Or-GEO. H. SAYWELL, SASKATOON 



CHICAGO 
ifigie mm w 




\ 



w\ 



A PRODUCT OF RECOGNIZED SUPERIORITY 

Combining all the raluable features which experience 
has demonstrated to be desirable. 

Chicago Sprite ^uit.(Eoro pcnjg, 

NEW YORK 




Send for Catalocu* M It 




Are You Ready to Deliver 

LIGHTNING and BLIZZRAD 



There will be a greater demand than ever this season, for we 
are advertising them more extensively to both dealer and 
consumer than ever before in the history of the business. 



Dealers and House • 

holders have 

learned 

that the Lightning 
and Blizzard Freez- 
ers make the finest 
cream with the least outlay in time, effort and material of 
any Freezer made and will stand igood hard use season 
after season. 

Better write Your Jobber at once. 

NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 




HARD W- A RE AND METAL 



SIGNS OF QUALITY 

ON GOOD 

Washers, Wringers and Churns 

ARROW 



BRAND 





•% 




YOU'LL SEE THEM AT THE BUSY STORES 

They're Trade Winners. No other line begins to equal 
them for Quality, Distinctiveness, Finish or Salability. 



THEY MEAN PROFIT TO DEALER AND SATISFACTION TO USER 



Eastern Agents, W. L. Haldimand & 
Son, Montreal, Que. 

Western Agents, H. F. Moulden & Son, 
■Winnipeg, Man. 



CUMMER - DOWSWELL, Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 



Thc S.M.P. Galvanized Wash Tubs 

With Wringer Attachments 



No hoops to 
fall off 




Light, yet strong 
and durable 



No. 

Inches 17| x 8i 20i x 11 23J x 11 251 x 11 

EXTRA HEAVY, WITH MALLEABLE HANDLES AND PAINTED BANDS 
No. 10 20 30 

Inches 20i x 11 23J x 11 25} x 11 

/V.S.— The No. have no Wringer Attachments 
PRICES ON APPLICATION 

HE SHEET METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY 



OF CANADA 
Montreal 



TORONTO 



LIMITED 

Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DISSTON HAND SAWS 




cte> ifakto «^Vt <& 



IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS 



LEWIS BROS., Limited, Montreal 



OTTAWA 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"To Show Goods is to Sell Them" 




A NEW YALE 

NIGHT LATCH SAMPLE BOARD 

All Retail Merchants know 
there is no method of selling 
goods so effective as showing 
them. 

This New Yale Sample Board 
is supplied with the most 
popular Yale Night Latches 
on the market and makes an 
attractive addition to your 
store fixtures. 

This Board is furnished in two 
ways, with and without an 
assortment. 

No. 100 Board with Night Latches Nos. 
42, 37, 33 and 26 mounted upon it, with 
an assortment for stock. 

No. "C" Board with Night Latches Nos. 
42, 37, 33 and 26 mounted upon it, no 
additional assortment. 



Size 6 inches wide by 18 inches long 



We Ship Promptly WRITE FOR PRICES AND CIRCULARS We Ship Promptly 



tf» FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, J& 

(Taw) WHOLESALE HARDWARE and IRON MERCHANTS Limited fgtiN) 

^^^ Montreal, ----- Canada 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Remington S3. Gu ns 



DOUBLE BARREL HAMMERLESS 




GRADE "K." 



No. 0312K — 30 inch blued steel barrels, choke bored, adapted for black or smokeless 
powder shells, flat matted extended rib, case hardened frame and mount- 
ings, top snap action, triple locked, automatic safety, half pistol grip 
stock, and snap fore end, checkered, rubber butt plate. 12 Gauge, 
weight 7 to 8% lbs. ..... List, each $37.00 

No. 0312KE — With automatic ejector, otherwise the same as No. 0312K. 12 Gauge, 

weight 7 to 8% lbs. ..... List, each $42.00 



REPEATING PUMP MODEL 




REMINGTON 

UMC 



HAMMERLESS 



No. 1—12 Gauge, 30 inch, blued finish steel barrel, full choke bored. Plain walnut 
pistol grip stock. Weight about 7% lbs.. 6 shot capacity, solid breech, take 
down pattern. Price ...... List, each $27.80 



MONTREAL AND WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



Steel Company of Canada 



Limited 



Bell Brand /w\ Horseshoes 



TRADE f ■ ^ I MARK 




REGISTERED 



Accurate Crease, Exact Punching, Correct 

and Uniform Shape. 

Horse Nails Wire Nails 

Bar Iron Bar Steel 

Bolts and Nuts, Screws, Tacks, Bright Wire Goods, 
Wrought Pipe, Iron and Steel Wire, Field Fencing. 

District Sales Offices: 

Hamilton Toronto Montreal Winnipeg 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Easy to Get a 



Satisfactory 
Selection 




f^ If there was no other reason for you sending 
to us for hardware, the size and assortment of 
the stock we carry is a good reason. 

The satisfaction you get in buying here lies in 
the fact that anything we send out can be 
depended upon for quality. 

Beyond that there is very little to say. The busi- 
ness speaks for itself, 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 



WE SHIP PROMPTLY 



TORONTO 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 



OUR PRICES ARE RIGHT 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




BUTTS 



AND 



HINGES 



Scientifically made by expert workmen on rapid modern 
machinery are not too good for you. Keep a full stock 
of all sizes — Demand them from your jobber. 

CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 



HAMILTON 



MANUFACTURERS 



CANADA 



i— Davidson's Family Flour Cans— 




Round — with overlapping Covers. Can be supplied 
Plain White, Japanned, or in Assorted Colors. 

Three Sizes, 25, 5(Tand 100 lbs. 



The "Empire" Flour Can 

TAKES UP LITTLE SPACE 
MADE TO HANG ON WALL OR DOOR 



Half Round Front, Flat Back, with hinge Cover 
White Japanned finish and lettered in gold 

Capacity 50 pounds 

Dimensions 18 in. high, 15 in. wide 




Fig 405 



WRITE FOR PRICES 



Fig 405 A 



The Thos. Davidson Mfg. Co., Limited 

MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



8 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DISSTON 




INSULATE SCREW DRIVER 

This tool is designed expressly for Electricians' use. The blade of crucible steel, 
hardened and tempered, is embedded in a handle of hard rubber of a texture that 
eliminates brittleness. It WILL NOT work loose. The rubber handle is milled 
grip, with projecting rings which prevent the hands from slipping down on to the 
blade. The hard rubber handle acts as insulation. 

The Disston Insulate Screw Driver is something new. Most 
practical Electricians' screw driver ever made. 

Henry Disston & Sons 

INCORPORATED 

Keystone Saw, Tool, Steel and File Works, - - PHILADELPHIA, P. A. 

Canadian Works— Fraser Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 




PartiaJ view of Trinidad Lake. The dark spots are asphalt ; the streams are water on the surface. 

Genasco 

the Trinidad-Lake- Asphalt Roofing 

You know the value of Trinidad Lake Asphalt as a waterproofer. Its natural oils keep it full of life. They have given it power to defend itself 
against the sun and storms of ages. 

In Genasco it gives the same lively resistance to sun, rain, wind, heat, cold, fire, alkalis, and acids, and makes Genasco permanently waterproof. 

This is what we are continually telling prospective customers through the leading magazines and agricultural papers of the country. 

We show them why Genasco is different from ordinary ready-roofing made of manufactured so-called asphalts, coal-tar, and "compositions" 
which soon lose their life, and crack, leak, and go to pieces. So they, too, know the value of Genasco, the Trinidad-Lake- Asphalt Roofing. 

Think how easy it is to sell what you and your customers already know is the genuine lasting roofing. 

We are helping your jobber to make selling still easier for you in many other ways. 

Order Genasco from your jobber, and ask him for advertising helps. 

The Ka <t-leak Kleet makes a weather-proof joint at roofing laps without cement, and prevents nail-leaks. Ask your jobber for Genasco 
with Kant-leak Kleets packed in the roll. 




THE BARBER ASPHALT 
PAVING COMPANY 

Largest producers of asphalt, and largest 
manufacturers of ready roofing in the world. 



Cross Section, Genasco Smooth-surfact Roofing. 



■■■■■Trinidad Lain- Asphalt 
^^^^^ Asphalt-saturated Wool Felt 
■■■i^BTrinidad Lake Asphalt 



New York 



PHILADELPHIA 

San Francisco Chicago 



Caverhill, Learmont & Company, 
Distributing Agents — Montreal, Winnipeg and Vancouver 

D. H. Howden & Co., Ltd.. 200 York St., London, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



National Fire Underwriters a 

Approve 



s 



INCE it is much stronger than 
Copper or Bronze, and resists 
fire better, Community Gal- 
vanized Sash Chain has been ap- 
proved by the National Board of 
Underwriters. 



COMMUNITY 

GALVANIZED SASH CHAIN 

Hercules Finish 

is made of steel hot galvanized and 
then heavily plated with copper. 
By this method of manufacture all 
defects of copper or bronze chain 
are avoided, and a better and more 
practical chain is produced at less 
cost. i 

GUARANTEED RUST PROOF 

WRITE FOR SAMPLES 
AND PRICES 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, LIMITED 

Niagara Falls, Canada 




i 



Showing casing 
cut away, al- 
lowing chain to 
be seen in posi- 
tion. 




■ »» ' . mim$iwi »-wp h m w »» 



NOTE--- We also manufacture Community Sash Chain 
in polished steel, galvanized and other finishes. 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Canada Clue Co., Limited 



OP 




Brantford, Toronto, Montreal 
and Vancouver 

The Largest Makers of 

Glue and Gelatine 

under the British Flag 
Can Supply any Quality in any Quantity. 







"GRISWOLD" 

HARDWARE 

LIGHT TO HANDLE AND 
CLEAN TO USE. It is not 
merely that "GRISWOLD" is 
an Aluminum Ware, but that 
it is the best Aluminum Ware 
there is. It was the first Aluminum Ware made, and 
though it now has competitors, it is still first both in 
quality and popularity. OUR PRODUCTS IN- 
CLUDE in many sizes — Waffle Irons.Gas Stoves and 
Ranges of various kinds. All our goods have the 
stamp of distinct originality, high quality and fine 
finish. Send for our catalog of Saleable Specialties. 

The Griswold Mfg. Co. 

ERIE, PA. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ASK US WHY 

If you want to know more about "STANDARD" 

^^ DOUBLE ACTING 
SPRING FLOOR 





ji HINGES, let us tell you a few dealers, the LARGEST 
jM and BEST, who believe in keeping UP-TO-DATE and 

, |^" are pushing- the "STANDARD" line. 



THE STANDARD MFG. CO., Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A. 




STANLEY METALLIC PLUMBS AND LEVELS are so designed as to 
remain true under all ordinary conditions. 

The metal cases in which both the Plumb and Level Glasses are set, are 
machined to fit accurately the machined surface of the supports which are cast 
in the frame of th? Level. 

THE CASES are held firmly on the supports by means of the cone centers 
which encage each end of the case. The center lines of the cases and cones 
are eccentric. With this arrangement the Levels can be readily adjusted or 
new glasses inserted. i«' < 

Only the very best of materials and highest grade of skilled labor obtain- 
able enter into their construction, and they carry with them the guarantee of 
a Company which has been manufacturing high-grade Carpenters' and Me- 
chanics' Too'« for over half a century. 

Send for Catalogue. 

_ Stanly 

foil* & JLevel Co. 



COPYRIGHTED 



£ A LEVEL CO. 



"Nxw Britain.Conn.USA. 



WIRE NAILS 



We have the latest machinery and 
every facility for producing best 
quality wire nails with perfect heads 
and points. Special care is taken in the drawing to obtain a regular gauge. Our 
Wire Nails are guaranteed full weight. Other lines we make and recommend are: 



Annealed Wire and Wire Bale Ties 



Very Soft and Pliable. Extra Strong 
GET OUR PRICES. 



The Laidlaw Bale-Tie Co., Hamilton, ont. 



Geo. W. Laidlaw, Vancouver, B.C. 



Harry F. Moulden, Winnipeg, Man. 



1 




The satisfied smile, 

Happy and bright, 
He's making a pile 

By using FLUXITE. 



THE PRACTICAL 
MAN USES 



FLUXITE 



The Paste Flux That 

IMPLIFIES SOl-DER 
AND SUPERSEDES LEAD BURNING 



I N G 



It solders even dirty metals without cleaning and without corrosion. It Joints lead 
without solder, merely by the use of a blow-lamp or blow-pipe. Anyone can do soldering 
work with Fluxite. It Is a necessity in the tool kit of every motor car, workshop and 
home. Easy to use. easy to sell. 

REMEMBER IT IN YOUR INDENTS. 

Packed in small and large tins. Made by 

THE AUTO CONTROLLER CO., m lSsDo^ d sl e ^G tey 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




is just an enthusiastic customer's phrase for expressing his appreciation of Greener Guns. It conveys in a concrete form the 
essence of many thousands of letters received at the Greener factory, letters written in every tongue, and from every clime, 
proving more conclusively than whole pages of our own descriptive writing that the Greener is without a rival in all that per- 
tains to the perfect gun; hard-hitting, far-shooting, perfection of handling, balance and finish, combined with lasting wearing 
qualities. Mr. Penn, of Columbus, says: "I cannot thank you enough for my new gun, it Is a jewel; I would not take $500.00 
for it. Hurrah! for W. W. Greener. He certainly is the only gunmaker." Here's just what all your customers want and 
they nearly all know it, too, Of course, you'll be ready to supply when the boom comes ! Let us send you our latest cata- 
logue free. It describes 38 grades, from $56.00 to $1,000.00. 



W. W. GREENER, 



GUN AND 
RIFLE MAKER 



63 and 65 Beaver Hall Hill 
Montreal, P.Q. 





MARK 

MAGNOLIA METAL - vs - "GENUINE" BABBITT 

MAGNOLIA TEST BLOCK; 

Ran 80 minutes under pressures varying from 
1000 to 2000 lbs. per square inch, 1600 
revolutions per minute; in perfect condition at 
end of test with smooth highly polished surface. 

"GENUINE" BABBITT TEST BLOCKS : 

The best grades of "Genuine" Babbitt were selected for these tests. 






Ran 15 minutes, 
1 ,000 lbs. square inch 



Ran 30 minutes, 
500 lbs. square inch 





Ran 5 minutes, 
1,000 lbs. square inch 



Ran 10 minutes, 
1,400 lbs. Souare inch 



Rati lO minutes, 
1,200 lbs. square inch 



We tested six other "Genuines" which were all similar to above. 

PRACTICAL ENGINEER POCKET BOOK, 680 pages, 
over 2,000 subjects. We do not aim to make a profit on this 
book aa it is an advertisement, therefore offer it at the very 
low price of 40c. postpaid Many Engineers pronounce it 
invaluable. Address Montreal Office. 



Special 
Offer 



Showing the Superiority of 
Magnolia over " Genuine " 

The tests shown hereon domonstrate our 
claim that a tin base metal is highly sus- 
ceptible to friction heat and therefore liable 
to squash, and that it is almost impossible 
to raise the temperature of a Magnolia- 
lined bearing to a destructive point; hence 
the secret of its wonderful success. i WtSttf l"^ 
Some day we will show you where a - 
Magnolia-lined bearing is running in shaft- __ 
ing and has been running for six years ;"i 
without one drop of lubrication. fh<j ■>iii_.J 
These tests were made by Dr. Torrey, who 
was then Chief Assayer oHhe U.S. Mint, J| 
New York. 



Sold by Leading Dealers Everywhere or by 

Magnolia 1 Metal Co. 



225 St. Ambroise Street 
TNEW YORK 



MONTREAL ggj 

CHICAGO affissaOEl 



13 



HARDWARE AMJ METAL 





is the BEST to Handle ? 

Don't run the risk of losing customers by selling inferior belting. 
If you are not carrying an assortment of Goodhue's Leather 
Belting you are losing good customers that you would otherwise 
have by specializing Our Superior Grade. 

Goodhue Belts 



The GOODHUE is absolutely reliable and dependable and is 
made from the finest grade material that can be obtained on the 
continent. 

The GOODHUE stretches from 15 to 25 per cent, less than, 
any other, which means a saving to your customers, and economy 
always introduces more trade. 

Our Belts are thoroughly tested and guaranteed and will 
OUTLAST any other. 

Write for Particulars and Prices. 

J. L. GOODHUE £& CO., LIMITED 

DANVILLE, P. Q. 






SOMEBODY'S GOING TO GET IT 

It Might as Well be You 

We are receiving inquiries every day from people who have occasion to 
buy SEBCO EXPANSION BOLTS. These inquiries might just as well go 
to you. If you could see some of the letters from Dealers, thanking us 
for sending them business, you would not hesitate to send for our 90 Day 
Special Dealers' Proposition. We can refer inquiries only to those who have 
our goods. 

It's easier to sell a man when he's in your store than it is to get him 
to come. We are paying to get men to come to you. Can you supply them? 

Star Expansion Bolt Company 

14 7-1 -19 Cedar St., cat. dept. no. se, New York City 

Bacon Bros., 377 St. Paul St., Montreal, Can.; Turner & Walker, 147 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, Can. 
H. F. Mcintosh & Co., 28 Toronto St., Toronto, Can. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






NOTICE THE TEETH 

OF NICHOLSON-MADE FILES 

They are all uniform height. This is 
one oi the features that makes them 
such rapid cutters. All teeth take hold 
of the work at once, and then, the 
steel used in every Nicholson-Made 
File is made up to our own strict 
specifications and differs in grade 
H according to the purpose for 
which different files are to be 
used. And our machinery 
is designed especially to 
make the tooth in different 
Nicholson -Made Files the 
best shape for each different 
purpose. 

These are the favorite Nich- 
olson-Made lines in Canada 

"American" 

"Arcade" 

"Great Western" 

"Globe" "Eagle" 

" McLellan " 

" Kearney & Foot " 

"J. B. Smith" 

These are the lines that you 
can stake your reputation 
upon. Ask your jobber 
about it. 

Nicholson File Co. 

(Dominion Works) 

Port Hope, Ontario 



I NF£>IOL". Off 




"AMPHIBIA" 

WATERPROOF 

THRESHER 
BELTING 

will, solve your customers' belting 
problems, if they are troubled with 
belting that comes apart when wet. 

This is just what "Amphibia" 
Thresher Belting will not do, be- 
cause it is specially made from first- 
class oak leather, which is guaran- 
teed waterproof, and is properly 
built to withstand any kind of 
dampness. 

"Amphibia Thresher" is the ori- 
ginal belting of this kind in Can- 
ada, and has many imitators, but 
is superior to all. 

Give it a trial and you will be of 
the same opinion as all other users, 
who recommend it as "The Best 
Ever." 

Write us for full particulars and 
prices. 



Sadler & Haworth 

ESTABLISHED 1876 

MONTREAL. Sll 'William St. TORONTO. '27 Melinda St. 

ST. JOHN. N.B.. 89 Prince William St. 

WINNIPEG. 244 Princess St. 
VANCOUVER. B.C.. 217 Columbia Ave. 



15 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TOP CORNICE No. 8014 

Height 30 in., Proj. 18 in. 




A Handsome, Bold, 

Neat, Clear-cut 

Cornice, throwing 

deep, rich shadows. 



AS A SPECULATION 



we made up a large quantity of this 
Cornice on our big new model power 
brake, and we made it to sell cheap. 
Let us quote on your requirements. 

GET OUR CATALOGUE 0-1 ON CORNICES, SKYLIGHTS, ETC., ETC. 

THE GALT ART METAL CO., Limited, GALT, ONT. 

MAKERS OF THE FAMOUS "GALT" SHINGLE. 




MERMAID 



"THE NAME'S THE GUARANTEE" 

BACKED BY 

130 Years' Experience 





1EAP-PROG 



: Extract 



171 -A Secret Process VANADIUM Steel 

(Also Straight Back) 

from The LONDON DAILY TELEGRAPH 

WHICH SPEAKS FOR ITSELF 

As a matter of fact, the trade of which Sheffield is the centre has in the last year or two fought — 
and won — a notable fight. Germany was a formidable competitor; America a yet more serious one, in 
the matter of tools, and especially SAWS. The English makers set themselves to meet this sharp 
rivalry, availing themselves of a superior position alike in materials and highly specialized skill. They 
took full advantage of the technical schools, with their scientific teaching as to metals and the treat- 
ment of steel, and paid more attention than they have ever done before to design and finish. Their 
energy and enterprise won prompt recognition from the buyers for the retail trade, and within very 
recent days they have enjoyed the spectacle of seeing the agent of one of the most noted firms of tool- 
makers in the United States coming over to make a tour of inquiry as to what had come over English 
, trade that they had lost it so entirely. The British manufacturers had, moreover, proved conclusively 

that, quality for quality, their products had nothing whatever to fear on the important matter of retail 
selling price, and their victory was complete. 

IF you are not handling our Saws and Edge Tools, you are paying more for inferior goods. 



D 



oes it pay you 



Sole Canadian Representative : 

J. A. HENDERSON, 

Metals and Hardware, MONTREAL 



Spear & Jackson, ltd. 

SHEFFIELD. England. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Copp's Stoves 
and Ranges 

SILVER QUEEN 




Our new medium 
priced up-to-date 
Range. 

It will pay you to 
nvestigateits 
merits. 



"The Western Stove Makers 

Fort William, Winnipeg. Vancouver. 



Builders' Hardware, Hinges, Hasps, etc 

They are Unexcelled in Quality. 





You won't have any difficulty selling COWAN & BRITTON Hardware. Their high quality and low price make them a 
valuable stock, appealing to careful buyers. They do their work more satisfactorily than other makes. 
Cowan & Briiton goods cost no more than many greatly inferior articles and give guaranteed service. 



COWAN <8L BRITTON, 



Established 
1861 



Gananoque, Ont. 



SNOW SHOVELS 

H ARDWAREMEN — You naturally want the best and most profitable line— We manufacture it — 
EUREKA lines represent everything from the smallest child's shovel to the large heavy 
lumberman's shovels. 

TAKE NOTE OF IT NOW— When ordering insist that your Jobber supply you the EUREKA 
lines-They will make you the most money— For QUALITY and FINISH they LEAD— Their cost 
is not any higher than other lines. If your wholesaler hasn't them write us for Catalogs and Prices. 

Schuchardt & Schutte, 307 Coristine Bldg., Montreal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



You can well believe the good reports of the 

"GOOD CHEER" 

WARM AIR FURNACE 

(The Circle Waterpan Furnace) 



For, to tell the truth, the results 
of the combination of the "Good 
Cheer" and our now famous Circle 
Waterpan have far exceeded even 
our own expectations. We knew 
that we were on the right road to 
the accomplishment of a more health- 
ful and comfortable heat, but such a 
complete revolution in heating 
methods as has resulted through it 
was more than we looked for. 




In comparison, ordinary furnace heat can only be classed 
as crude. Humidity is an essential, and the Circle Water- 
pan alone gives desired results. Beware of humidity 
claims based on makeshift contrivances. Good Cheer 
warmth is ideal and people are willing to pay the price 
for heat of this kind. 

There's profit in this class of furnace work. 

The James Stewart Manufacturing Co., Limited 

WOODSTOCK, - ONTARIO 

WESTERN WAREHOUSE— 156 LOMBARD ST., WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Distributing Agencies: 

McLennan, McFeely & Co., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Wood, Vallance Hardware Co., 
Nelson, B.C. 



Ross Bros., Limited, 
Edmonton, Alta. 



18 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SUMMER SPECIALTIES 

Asbestos -Lined Covers 
for Mrs. Potts 9 Irons 

This cover is made from two separate steel covers with heavy 
asbestos between : made to cover a set of three irons. It is used 
on Gas, Gasolene, Oil or Wood Stoves or Ranges, and will 
save the price of itself in fuel in a very short time. 




Measuring Cups 

Marked for Measuring One- 
quarter and One-third 
Cups. 



Strainer Funnels 

(Strainer and Funnel Combined) 





GREATLY FACILITATE THE WORK IN THE KITCHEN 



A QUICK FIRE AND A GOOD OVEN 

That is what 

The " LeRoy " 

means 

And that's what campers and 
summer cottagers require. 
The "LeRoy" is just the 
range for the summer season. 
It has a good oven, therefore 
campers need not do without 
any of the pastry delicacies 
of home. It fires up quickly, 
and coolsequally fast when the 
fire is quenched. Can be 
supplied with legs. 

SUGGEST THIS RANGE TO YOUR CUSTOM f RS 

McCLARY'S 




Style 9C 



LONDON 
TORONTO 
MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 
ST. JOHN 



HAMILTON 
CALGARY 
SASKATOON 



|!> 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Saskatchewan Glass and Supply Company, Ltd 



WHOLESALE IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



Glass and Builders 9 Supplies 



WE CARRY A FULL STOCK OF THE FOLLOWING: 



1'olished Plate Glass 
Window nnd Leaded Glasd 
Pane; and Wired Glass 
Mirrors and Bevelled Plates 
Piasters, Limes and Cements 

No order too large or too small. 



Building and Sheathing Papers Metallic Ceilings and Cornices 

Felt and Asbestos Papers Metallic Shingles and Sidings 

Rubber Roofings and Roofing Papers Sewer Pipe and Tilings 

Nails and Sash Pins Plasterers' Hair, Sash Bars, Brick 
Putty and Glaziers' Points Mantels, Grates and Tile. 



Prompt shipments our specialty. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



P O. BOX 670 



Cor. Manitoba and Sixth Avenue 

MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN 



TELEPHONE 348 



I! 









Convex Reversible Wafer. " Upright.' 



REGISTERS 

All Known Sizes, Shapes and Finishes 

The Genuine Convex Reversible 
Wafer works either way, by 
simply changing two screws. 

All Varieties of Registers, 
Faces and Borders supplied 
in any quantity or finish. 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co. "SffiS.'* 



HMIIII I Ml III toMM— I 



Convex Reversible Wafer. "Across." 



r &RARMS(b 



<J Right in every hardware store is the most logical place for a line of reliable, accurate, and moder- 
ate-priced single guns. 

For ridding premises of pests — snakes, rats, 'chucks and the many kinds of crop and poultry de- 
stroyers, the Harrington & Richardson single guns are specially suited. 

CJ There is a large and growing demand for an economical and efficient weapon for just that purpose, 
as well as for occasional hunting. 



Here's the gun : 





TRADE 




Specifications, 12 to 28 gauge— 26 lo 32 inch barrel— ejecting or non-ejecting— fine black walnut stock— hard 
rubber butt plate— weight 5% to 6% lbs., according to gauge and barrel. For black or smokeless powder. 

CJ These guns are quick sellers. They are made and sold under the broad H. & R. guarantee of quality, 
reliability and satisfaction. With a few of these H. & R. guns in stock, the hardware dealer is 
equipped for a profitable and increasing trade. 

Our 40-page catalogue is yours for the asking. It contains valuable selling points for every hard- 
ware dealer and shows the complete H. & R. line. Ask for it now while you think of it. 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., ™ r ?%.TJZ:. 



20 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

Empire King 

FURNACE 



has all the latest improvements 
found on our more expensive 
furnace, but is sold at a lower 
price. The simplicity in con- 
struction and the quick heating 
ability of the "KING" furnace, go 
to make it the most durable, effi- 
cient, and the best furnace at the 
price on the market. 

Write us for catalogue and price 
list of this reliable and quick seller. 

WRITE US DIRECT OR 
ANY OF OUR AGENCIES 




The Canadian Heating 
and Ventilating Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



The Christie Bros. Co., Ltd. 

802 College Street 

TORONTO 



3 The Christie Bros. Co.. Ltd, 
Cor. Park and Henry Sts. 
WINNIPEG 



The Atkins Company 
VANCOUVER 




NAMCO 



WHENEVER you see this 
emblem remember that it 
stands for all that is first 
rate in the manufacture and use 
of Screws, Nuts and special parts 
made in our new plant at 
Montreal. 



THE equipment is complete, 
the service established, the 
product Strictly Acme and 
the price reasonable. 



ASK for Catalogue "Milled 
Products." Send the 
samples, or better, drop in 
at the plant and see how the parts 
are made. 



The National-Acme 
Mfg. Co., Montreal 



BRANCH OFFICES: 

NEW YORK. 77 White Street 
BOSTON. Ml Milk Street 
DETROIT. 1222 Majestic Building 
CHICAGO. 549 Washington Boulevard 
ATLANTA, Candler Building 

WAREHOUSES: 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO 

FACTORIES: 

CLEVELAND. MONTREAL. CANADA 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






Hamilton Jewel Gas Rang 



for MANUFACTURED or NATURAL GAS are made in over 125 VARIETIES 
and Every Requirement can be Supplied. 



Single Oven 

Size of Oven Size of Top 




The Ovens have Spring 
Balanced Drop Doors. The 
Valves, Airmixers and other 
trimmings are all nickel plated. 
Galvanized Dust Tray under Top 
Burners. The body of Range is 
Asbestos Lined. All these 
Ranges are equipped with 
Grave's Patent Safety Lighter* 
— see cut above. This lighter is 
far superior to the old style 
Pilot Light. It is absolutely safe 
because the oven door must be 
opened before the Oven Burners 
can be lighted, and thus all 
possibility of explosion through 
accidental accumulation of gas in 
the oven is avoided. 



A Thermometer for regis- 
tering the heat of Oven can be 
attached to the Oven door of 
any Hamilton Jewel Gas Range. 

These Ranges can be fitted 
with Hot Water Heating attach- 
ments, or with Reservoirs or 
Side Broilers, and Top can be 
extended if desired: 



Large Hotel 
Ranges 

are supplied in every style. 



17x12x12 in. 
17x12x12 in. 
16xK5xll| in. 
15|xl6Jxll in. 
16jxl(ijxll in. 
18xl6jxll in. 
19x184x12 in. 



22x19 in. 
32x18 in. 
35}x22j in. 
:i")ix22J in. 
36fx224 in. 
38|x22J in. 
39x241 in. 



Double Oven 



Size of Oven 
15Jxl6ixll 
16^x16^x11 
18x16^x11 
19x18^x12 



Size of Top 
15 !x 16x8$ 
16£xl6x8J 
18xl6x8J 
19xl8ix8 





Elevated Oven 

Ranges are made in many 
different styles which are fully 
described in our Catalogue 
No. 69. 



We also make various 



styles of 



Side Oven 



Ranges, which we have not 
roomlo illustrate here. 



If you have not got our 
catalogue, write us for one. 

All Ranges are thoroughly 
tested before leaving factory. 



Each Range is fitted with 

Jewel Adjustable 
Needle Valve 

which gives perfect control of 
gas supply. For accurate 
mechanical construction and 
satisfactory working, no other 
valve equals it 

Get our Catalogue 
No. 69 



MANUFACTURED BY 



The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Limited 

Head Office and Factory at HAMILTON Winnipeg Branch, 130 James Ave. 

Agencies at Toronto, Montreal, Vancouver. 



22 



HARD WAKE AND METAL 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

" Comet " Brand 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Maker* 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sola Canadian Sale* sent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

13 St. John Street - Montreal 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Uaed In factories of all kind*- for 
hurried machine repairs. 

All machine ihopa and railway 
ahopi ihonld have It. 

Bridge bnlldera, track lajeri, 
and itructnral metal worker* 
hare conitant nae for It. 

Send for Description. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER . ■ ONTARIO 



ON DON BAR IRON 

is the best line of bar iron 
that money can buy. It pos- 
sesses a uniformity of tex- 
ture, toughness, and easy 
workability that means 
perfect satisfaction both to 
you and to your customers. 
And the price is as low as 
we can make it without 
\ sacrificing anything of its 
quality. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON CANADA 

SALES AGENTS 
Ontario — Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba — Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 



9cjp& 



TINSMITHS' HELPER AND PATTERN BOOKS 

A useful handbook for Tinners and Sheet Metal 
Workers. It treats the simpler problems in pattern 
cutting occurring daily in the shop besides giving tables 
and information constantly needed by the mechanic. 
Section 1— DIAGRAMS and PATTERNS. Demonstrates 
50 examples of pattern work, such as cutting flared tin- 
ware, elbow patterns, etc. 

Section 2 -EPITOME OF MENSURATION. Describes 
how to find the area and circumference of a circle, con- 
tents of a sphere, etc. 

Section 3— TABLES, RULES and RECIPES. Gives the 
weights of sheet metals, capacity of cans, recipes for 
mixing solders, cements, etc. 
Price $1. S3 Figures 

MacLean Publishing Company 

Technical Book Dept. 143-149 University Ave., Toronto, Can. 

. __ _ _ 




Three 
One 



We have just 
issued under one 
cover new booklet 
containing 

First 

illustrations. 

Second 

descriptive matter. 

Third 

list prices of our 
complete line of 

Furnaces and 
Furnace Materials 

and 

Boilers and 
Boiler Materials 

Copies have 
already been 
mailed to our 
numerous customers 
in On ario. 
Possibly some 
have been overlooked. 
Have you received 
a copy? 

If not, communicate 
with us to-day 

Pease Foundry Company 



■UM1TED- 



Toronto, 



Canada 



Pease-Waldon Company 



. LIMITED - 



Winnipeg, 



Canada 



We manufacture and stock 
all materials required in con- 
nection with Warm Air, Hot 
Water and Steam Heating 
Installation*. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLEAN, SATISFACTORY 

PROFITS 



can only be secured by selling a 
reliable and serviceable article. In 

STILL'S 

AXE HANDLES 

you will have everything that is de- 
sired in a quick-selling and reliable 
handle. The shaping, balancing, fin- 
ishing and selection of wood are done 
by experts, and an absolute guarantee 
accompanies every handle that leaves 
our factory. Write for price list. 

J. H. Still Mfg. Co., Ltd. 



ST. THOMAS 



ONTARIO 



SELL 



Stratford Garden Seats 



They are a high-grade 
line of well - made 
seats, attractively 
finished and strong, 
yet light Made of 
good, strong beech, 
seat and slats are 
screwed firmly to the 
supporting frame, en- 
suring th utmost 
rigidity. Frame paint- 
ed red — the balance natural wood varnished. 
Packed two in a bundle. 

Now is the time to stock up with this favorite 
line ! Better send along your enquiry to-day. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE •• B." 

The Stratford Mfg. Co., Limited 

STRATFORD, .... ONTARIO 

Manufacturers of 
LADDERS. LAWN SWINGS. ETC. 





6: 



For Elevator, Haulage 

or other 

Strenuous Use 

there is nothing better made 
than 

GREENING 



^| Wire Rope. 



All wire used in Greening 
Ropes is subjected to a complete 
set of the severest tests before 
being made into rope, and you 
have our unmistakable guaran- 
tee back of every piece of rope 
you sell. 

We are makers of special 
Hay Fork Ropes, Saw Carriage 
Ropes, Smoke Stack Stays, Flag 
Halyards, and other purposes. 

Along with the wire rope 
you can do good business selling 
Greening's Rope Grease and 
Rope Fittings. 

Study the Greening cata- 
logue. It is full of points of 
interest for the hardwareman. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE 

COMPANY, LIMITED 




Hamilton, 
Ont. 



Montreal, 
Que. 




24 



HARDWARE AND'METAL 




METALLIC CEILINGS 

"Boost Them, Mr. Hardware Man, Boost Them." 



Get the " Metallic Ceiling 
Name " in your town. 



You can do it by a little window 
display, a little advertising and 
• little talk. 



Metallic Ceilings carry 
three separate profits— on 
the sale of the goods, on the 
erection and on the paint to re- 
coat them. 

Get in touch with us to-day 




If you erect the Metallic Ceilings you 
sell you will appreciate the true lines 
and snug fit of OUR plates. 

They can't " run " because 
they're dead square. They 
go on quick and easy. 



Twenty-six years' ex- 
perience has taught us 
a thing or two about 
making Metallic Ceil- 
ings. 



Catalogue and Samples on Request. 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



WINNIPEG, MAN. 

(20) 



Get the Local agency for "Safelock" Wire Fence 

You will find "Safelock" the best selling line of fence you ever handled, because 
you can prove by actual demonstration that it really is the strongest fence made. 

Look at this little cut — note how the stay wires interlock where they wrap the strand 
wire. You simply cannot make a "Safelock" stay slip in any direction. And, as the 
strand wires are not kinked , at the lock, every wire retains its full strength. 

Better write us to-day about getting mn exclusive "Safelock" agency for your locality 

The Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Ltd., Owen Sound, Ont. 

Western Agents : The Brandon Safelock Fence Co., Brandon, Man. 




EAVETROUGH and 

CONDUCTOR 

PIPE THAT DO 

NOT FIT 

TOGETHER 

EASILY ARE 

DEAR AT ANY 

PRICE. 




Ours are noted for their uniformit> and the ease with which they 
can be put up on the job. Other well-known lines of ours are 
Ventilators, Skylights, Ridge Roll, Valleys, Elbows and 

CORRUGATED IRON 




WHEN IN A HURRY 
ORDER FROM US 

Wheeler 
& Bain 

THE OUICK SHIPPERS 

Toronto, Canada. 



25 



HARD W A RE AND METAL 





You can easily reach every shell in your store by using a 

Bicycle Step Ladder 

It works noiselessly and easily, a gentle push sufficing to 
move it many teet. Being supported on solid foundations, it is 
absolutely safe and the adjustments prevent it jumping the track 
when it is in motion. 

Far from disfiguring a store a Bicycle Step Ladder with its 
light metal track and handsome turned pole is very ornamenta 1 . 

We design Bicycle Step Ladders to meet all requirements. 

LET US SEND YOU OUR CATALOG. 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Go., Ltd., W? 




TELEGRAMS: "BIGSBY. MITCHAM." 



(Established 1840) 



W. T. BIGSBY <& SONS, 



CODE : A B C 5th EDITION 

MITCHAM, 
LONDON 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



OIL AND SPIRIT VARNISHES, JAPANS, LACQUERS, 
PAINTS, ENAMELS AND TURPENTINE SUBSTITUTE 

FQR THE USE OF 

Railway Companies, Shipbuilders, Eleclr cal and other Engineers, Coachbuilders, Makers of Bodies for Vehicles 

of all Kinds, Builders, House Painters, Ironmongers, Oil and Colourmen, Cabinet and 

Furniture Makers.. Tin-Plate Printers, etc., etc. 

LITHOGRAPHIC and LETTERPRESS PRINTING INKS 

For Newspapers, Magazines, Advertisement Posters, Art Calendars and Other High-Class Work, 

Tin-Plate and Cardbord Printers, etc. 

Our Agents in Quebec and Ontario are: THE MOUNT ROYAL COLOR & VARNISH CO., 193 Dorchester St, East, Montreal. 

For Brirsh Columbia— AMES BROS., Box 355, Vancouver, B.C. 

Saskatchewan, Alberta, Assiniboia and Manitoba — G. H. SAYWELL, Saskatoon. 

Mr. Saywell will shortly be calling on you to fix up Agencies 



"A Necessity to a Skilled Mechanic" 




High grade mechanics 1 
demand a clean cutting 
file. 

Delta Files perform 
every service that is 
demanded of the ideal 
file. 

DELTA FILE WORKS 




Delta Files are made 
from the best English 
Steel, with extra strong 
teeth. 

Many Hardwaremen 
are making Delta Files 
a specialty, as they give 
satisfaction. Write for 
price list. 



PHILADELPHIA, PA. 



Canadian Selling Agents — H. S. Howland, Sons & Co , Toronto ; Stark-Seybold, Montreal ; 
Wm. Stairs, Son & Morrow, Halifax. 




DELTA 



26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Will the trade please remember that - 

The Toronto Silver Plate Company, Limited 

Are Not in the Trust, or are they Members of any Silverware 
Association or Combine. 

And goods stamped with their name are absolutely guaranteed as 
to quality. 




TORONTO SILVER PLATE C( 




FACTORIES AND SALESROOMS, WEST KING ST., TORONTO 

E. G. GOODERHAM, President 



ALL 
DESCRIPTIONS 



BRASS RAILINGS 



MADE TO 
ORDER 



THE BOOTH-COULTER COPPER & BRASS CO., LIMITED 

Coppersmiths and Brass Founders, : : : : : : TORONTO. ONT. 



NUMBER 

108 




AUTOMATIC DRILL 

Every dealer who takes pride in the quality of the goods which he offers 
should have this fine drill in stock. 

Its design and construction are the results of more than 20 years dtvoted 
to the manufacture and sale of such goods. 

We KNOW it is RIGHT and YOUR customers will appreciate it. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 



ts/yv/bmi/AtL, 



GREENFIELD, 



MASS., U.S.A. 



27 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




10 Foot Power Press or Brake 

Capacity, No. 10 Gauge Soft Steel. 
Weight, 28,000 ibs. 



This machine is of the most MODERN design and embraces 
new features that are a distinct advantage. It is complete 
in every respect. Manufacturers of METAL WINDOW 
FRAMES AND SASH, FIRE-PROOF DOORS, ETC., will 
find it a most economical investment. 



WRITE FOR PRICE AND FURTHER PARTICULARS 

THE BROWN, BOGGS CO., Ltd., HAMILTON, ONT, 

TINSMITHS' TOOLS, SHEET METAL WORKERS' TOOLS, PRESSES, DIES 

23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Canadian Leaders in Dry Cells 

COLUMBIA 

There can be only one leader in any given line. That leadership must 
be obtained and recognized on account of superior qualities proven in 
service. 

On this basis Columbia has -won the distinction of having the longest 
life, being the lowest in cost in the end, and giving the maximum of 
good service. 

It is made of tested material, and only skilled men and highly special- 
ized machinery put the ingredients together. 

To make Columbia of greatest service to our customers we have made 
it from two formulas that produce somewhat different results. 
COLUMBIA is a light drain cell for all forms of intermittent work — 
bells, telephones, signals, self winding clocks, electrical toys, wireless 

telegraph outfits, and numerous other things 

Its chief qualities are long shelf life, uniformity of service, and low cost when compared with the length of 

its life. 

COLUMBIA IGNITOR is somewhat different. It is a strong current, quick recuperating cell for all forms 

of motor ignition — automobiles, motor boats, gas and gasoline engines, motor cycles, aeroplanes. 

When once used these will be always used. For sale by all electrical dealers. 

Address H.M.— 11 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Ltd. - Toronto, Ont. 

NOTE — Our New Factory at Toronto is thoroughly prepared to make quick shipments 
of fresh cells in any quantity. 



CANADIAN JSj 

ui carbon co- m 

TORONTO, ost-JM 




>»tii 



"Ml CARBON C°" 
Toronto. Ont. 



h 



Easy Work for Big Money 

A few hours daily that you don't know how to fill ? 
Well here is a proposition you may like 

JOIN THE MACLEAN ORGANIZATION 

as one of its circulation men. You will have splendid scope on 
MacLean's Magazine, and later on the other thirteen publications 
as well. 

Many of our most successful circulation men began as spare 
time representatives, but soon found their spare time work paying 
so much better than their regular work that they gave their whole 
time to selling the MacLean Publications. Their experience may 
be yours. Try it and see. 



MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO. 



143-149 University Ave., 



Toronto, Ont. 



29 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Game Getters 

REGAL, IMPERIAL, 

SOVEREICN, CROWN, 

SHOT SHELLS 



The most successful sportsmen choose 
DOMINION because of the unexcelled quality 
at the less duty price. 

Dependable, High Uniform Velocity, Perfect Patterns 

PENETRATE and KILL 





Because we load all Smokeless 
Shells with CHILLED Shot which 
will penetrate the thickest feathers 
and not flatten out and stop in 
the down as Soit or Drop Shot. 



Buy Guaranteed 
Canadian Made 
Ammunition. 



Dominion Cartridge Company, Limited, Montreal 



REMINGTON 

UMC 



T *AD( MfcO* 



RIFLE AND PISTOL 
CARTRIDGES 

For One-SKot Hills 




For small game, big game, target or protection in any make of 
gun under all weather conditions. 

The uniform ignition due to the perfection of the famous 
Remington-UMC primer, makes for sure fire, accuracy and 
penetration. 

In Remington-UMC big game cartridges, perfect combustion, accurate gauging, guarantee 
uniform flight in long range shots. 

Order now through your jobber. 

Our extensive advertising insures your sales. 

/^em/ngtoa-L/MC TH e perfect shooting combination 

Remington Arms = Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 



299 Broadway, 



New York City 



30 



A Barrie Store Designed on Modern Lines 

J. R. Hambly, Whose Store was Burned Last Winter has Replaced it With Fine 
Building— Equipment of Most Improved Construction— All Fittings Selected for 
Convenience and Space-saving Qualities. 



When J. R. Hambly 's hardware store, 
at Barrie, Ont., was destroyed by fire on 
.March 16th last, he was the recipient 
of messages of sympathy from every 
part of the province. For, having been 
a president of the Ontario Retail Hard- 
ware and Stove Dealers' Association, 
and one of its most active promoters, his 
friends are legion, among the trade. 
Now. however, it is in order for these 
same friends to extend their congratu- 
lations. Mr. Hambly is now settled in 
his new premises, which will compare 
favorably in plan and equipment with 
any in the province. 

A Big Loss Sustained. 

The fire which gutted his store last 
March was a serious one, and the loss 
was considerably larger than the insur- 
ance. The stock which had escaped ut- 
ter destruction was badly damaged. The 
bright labels on the paint stock and 
other tinned packages had lost their lus- 
tre, and the tinware and polished goods 
were smoked up in bad shape. It was 
a sorry looking spectacle after the fire 
had subsided and the water had been 
t urned off. 

Mr. Hambly, however, did not lose any 
time in lamentations. As soon as the 
insurance had been adjusted, he secured 
temporary quarters, sorted up his stock, 
held a fire sale, and ran off the slightly 
damaged goods at prices which created 
a demand. 

Meanwhile, the builders had been busy 
renovating the burned-out premises, and, 
on June 1st, only about ten weeks after 
the fire, Mr. Hambly moved back to the 
original store which had been thorough- 
ly repaired, and remodelled to suit the 
needs of a present-day hardware busi- 
ness. 

Arranged for Convenience. 

The new store, views of which accom- 
pany this article, lias a show room space 
of 120x28 feet, with the stock arranged 



to secure the greatest amount of con- 
venience to both clerks and customers. 
On each side of the entrance is a show 
window 6x8 feet in size. Entering the 
store, the first feature to attract atten- 
tion is a beautifully-finished oak wall 
case, on the left. This case is 10 ft. long 
by 8 ft. high, and is devoted to the dis- 
play of silverware and cut glass. Be- 
yond this case the shelving for tin and 
graniteware extends to the elevator, be- 
yond which is the paint department. 



Adjoining this is another 12-foot coun- 
ter, fitted in front with one shelf, above 
which pigeon-holes 10 inches quare ex- 
tend the entire length of the counter. 

In front of the gun and tool case is a 
combination show case 12 feet long. The 
back of this case is fitted with two rows 
of drawers, and two narrow shelves in 
front for display of seasonable goods 
also run along the bottom below the 
glass. Next to this show case is an open- 
front counter 12 feet long, with a 10-in, 



! 



Convenient nail counter in J. R. Hambly 's new store. 



Ample room is given in this department 
for the display of a representative line 
of paints and varnishes, and, immedi- 
ately behind, is a convenient storeroom 
for surplus paint stock. 

Commencing at the left of the en- 
trance, and in front of the wall case and 
open shelving, 24 feet of silent sales- 
men extend toward the elevator. These 
are devoted to the display of silver and 
glassware, fancy brass goods and simi- 
lar specialties, of which Mr. Hambly • 
makes a decided feature. The display 
in this department is arranged with a 
care and taste which give an exceedingly 
attractive appearance. 

Arrangement on Right Side. 

At the right of the entrance is a built- 
in wall case, 12 feet long, for the dis- 
play of guns and tools, which are ar- 
ranged most artistically. Extending 
from this case for a distance of 40 feet 
are 12 rows of Bennett drawers. 



panel base. The two shelves in the open 
front accommodate a supply of neatly- 
arranged seasonable goods. 

A Convenient Nail Counter. 

Beyond this is a nail counter 12 feet 
long, with a double row of bins on each 
side, sufficient to hold every size of nail 
manufactured. The convenience of this 
arrangement in handling nails can be 
readily conceived, as any size is easy 
of access without the slightest delay, 
and besides, the customer can see what 
he wants before he asks for it. The time- 
saving value of this arrangement is at 
once apparent, and this is* an important 
feature in selling such a line as nails. 

Behind the nail counter are kept the 
brass and steam fittings, and beyond this 
is the tool department. 

Stove Department Elevated. 
At the rear of the store the stove dis- 
play is made. Here again the same good 



ELEV/ 1 


TOR 
















PAINT ROOM 




6X8FT 


W«ll C»4l 1 OPEN 3ME.LVINO 1 
\0 r |TIN », GRANITE. WARE.I 




[PAINTS 1 




OFFICL 


STOVE PUPT 
ON 2 fT FJIVrVTION 














24 FT. SILENT .5A|F5MAN| 


COUNTER | 


^ 










12 FT. 




I2FT. I2FT 












6X8FI 




OPEN TRONT 
SHOW CASE 




COUNTER | | COUNTER 




NAILS 






1 


2 FT 




40 fT 








C&VfcTOOLsl BENNETT DRAWERS 


BRASS * STtAn 

FMTTING.3 ) 


TOOLS 



Flan cf the new store~of J. R. Hambly, harri 
31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



taste in display and arrangemenl is 
shown. The departmenl is nut over- 
crowded and is \cr\ easj of access, the 
idea in mind when planning the depart- 
ment was to give every facility tor the 
demonstration of individual Btoves, so 
thai customers could comfortably exam- 
ine everj feature of anj stove in which 
they might be interested. 

Two large skylights give the stove de- 
partment a very bright and cheerful .1 1 >- 
pearance, and show off the stock to best 
advantage. 

Just between the hardware and stove 
departments is a roomy and well-lighted 
office, with vault accommodation. The 
office is splendidly furnished. 

Some Features of the Equipment. 

On each side of the store a traveling 
ladder gives ready access to the shelving. 

At niuht the store is brilliantly illum- 



inated with Tungsten lamps, ten in num- 
ber, each id' which has a capacity of 100 
candle power. The effect upon the 
brightly-polished goods in the show cases 
and silent salesmen may be imagined. 

On the second floor is located the 
plumbing and tinsmithing department, 
and above this is a storeroom for vari- 
ous kinds of stock. 

At the rear of the store is a la rue 
storeroom, 50 feet long, for heavy goods, 
with a convenient side entrance. 

hi the lay-out of the store every bit 
of space has been used to advantage, 
but in no part is there any appearance 
of disorder or over-crowding. Goods are 
arranged in such an attractive and con- 
venient manner that the visitor who 
goes in just to have a look will feel 
strongly tempted to buy something be- 
fore leaving. 



grades of stoves, particularly camp 
stoves. This kind of heater will serve 
for use in the tents and rough buildings 
which will have to serve until more sub- 
stantial structures can be erected. 

It is not at all likely that any of the 
wholesalers or manufacturers will suf- 
fer loss as a result of the fire. 



Busy Times in Fire-Swept District of the North 

Heavy Demand for Hardware i s Felt — Dealers are Already 
Established in Business Again — New Firms Entering Porcu- 
pine — Frank Child's Store at Matheson r Saved. 



Cochrane, Ont., July 18. — There is a 
silver lining to every cloud and the losses 
sustained by the hardwaremen in this 
section during the dreadful fires of a 
week ago are being partially compen- 
sated for by the wonderful rush of busi- 
ness now being experienced. The re- 
building of this town will mean a great 
deal of business for the hardware deal- 
ers. Already there is a heavy demand 
for nails, locks, hinges, tools, lime, and 
all the hundred and one articles neces- 
sary in building operations. In order to 
meet the demand, carloads of material 
are being shipped in. 

Local hardwaremen are already start- 
ed in business. Frank A. Child arrived 
the latter part of last week with a big 
stock and with tents to serve as tempor- 
ary business quarters. He is already 
well ensconced under canvas and is do- 
ing a good trade. Mr. Child's store at 
Matheson was saved, despite the fact 
that it was thought last week that the 
whole town would go. Mr. Child will 
not reopen at Kelso Mines, but will, as 
soon as possible, start work on the con- 
struction of his new cement store build- 
ing. 

New Stores Starting. 

Porcupine, July 18. — The inevitable 
reaction from the despair which settled 
down on the inhabitants of this sorely 
desolated spot has now set in and the 
work of rebuilding has been started with 
almost feverish energy. 

The Bell & Rochester hardware store 
will be rebuilt on Bruce Avenue. It is 
asserted that the Geo. Taylor Hardware 



Co., of Cobalt, have taken an option on 
two lots here to-day and that they are 
considering starting here in the hard- 
ware business. Leslie Taylor will also 
locate here. 

It is understood that Hardwareman 
Joy, of South Porcupine, who had a 
stock of $11,000, suffered a heavy loss. 
He had ordered goods in Toronto to the 
extent of two carloads, including a large 
consignment of stoves, just a short time 
before the tragic conflagration. Luckily, 
the goods had not been shipped and he 
was saved that loss. 

Big Shipments Made. 

Toronto, July 19.- — It is quite apparent 
that the next few months will see a big 
business in hardware in the fire-swept 
regions of northern Ontario. The steps 
being taken to rebuild the towns without 
a day's delay necessitate the consump- 
tion of a .great amount of hardware. 

"We are receiving rush orders by 
telegraph for carloads of goods," said a 
local jobber to-day. "Apparently South 
Porcupine is cleaned right out, as all our 
orders have come from Golden City and 
Cochrane. At present Golden City is the 
base of supplies for Porcupine." 

Large shipments were made the first 
few days of the week, but the rush of 
business has continued pretty well ever 
since. The orders were mostly for build- 
ing material, such as roofing, tar paper, 
chain, ropes, etc. Considerable glass and 
general hardware has also been shipped 
up. 

Stove manufacturers state that a 
heavy demand has been felt for certain 

32 



TELLS OF OLDEN DAYS. 

Interesting reminiscences of olden 
days in Montreal are related by L. J. A. 
Surveyor, one of the best known of 
Canadian hardwaremen, in the "I re- 
member" column of the Montreal Star. 

"A wholesome life it was," said Mr. 
Surveyor. "The people lived longer 
then. I feel certain they were happier 
then than they are now — driven, as they 
are, for the most part, by the goad of 
material desire. No one thought then 
of great riches. Men did not worry 
themselves to death about making mon- 
ey. Nor did we sit up till one or two 
o'clock in the morning. We went to 
bed at reasonable hours and got up fresh 
the following morning." 

"Between the tallow candle and the 
electric light (now in the homes of the 
poorest), there is quite a contrast?" 
was suggested. 

"Yes; but with the tallow candle 
there was just as much pleasure in life 
as there is with the electric light. We 
all find and accept our metier," said Mr. 
Surveyor, philosophically. "Most peo- 
ple used the tallow candle at the time I 
refer to which was in the early fifties ; 
but some used sweet oil. This was rath- 
er expensive, and could not be afforded 
by the generality of the people. After 
the sweet oil came the coal oil ; and a 
Mr. Chanteloupe made a lot of money 
by a patent invention by which he made 
it possible to use the coal oil in the 
sweet oil lamp. Coal oil was quite an 
innovation, and an immense surprise and 
delight, after the candles. The stores 
of the city were illuminated with it, and, 
contrasted with the previous darkness 
of the streets, ,the change was enorm- 
ous. ' ' 

Mr. Surveyor has been connected with 
the hardware business since boyhood, 
almost. He was clerk successively in 
Messrs. Ferrier's and Davidson's. As 
such, he came into contact with many of 
the British officers, under the old mili- 
tary regime. 

"They used to come to buy portable 
bath tubs; and sometimes I would sell 
them as many as twelve in the day," he 
said. "Some of them were rich; all 
were merry. But you could easily tell 
those that were poor. The rich ones 
paid little attention to them. Not that 
they shunned them in any way; but, 
knowing how matters stood, they would 
not try to connect them with their ex- 
pensive pleasures." 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Price Marking is Now Widely Favored 

Dealers Find That Arguments in Favor Outweigh the Objec- 
tions — The Experience of H. Oc comore, Guelph, in This Respect 
—Montreal Dealer Gets Best Results— A Knack in Writing 
Price Cards. 



That price marking pays is accepted 
by a majority of hardware dealers 
nowadays. Not so long ago, few stores 
could be found where cards were prom- 
inently displayed with the price of 
articles marked thereon. To-day, the 
card is a feature of practically every 
window display and it is also used to 
good effect in the stores. 

Some dealers still cling to the belief 
that price marking is not advisable. 
There are, of course, arguments to be 
adduced in favor of this view. If the 
price of an article in the window is 
not marked, it sometimes happens that 
people will walk into the store to find 
out what the price is. This happens 
rarely and it is perhaps safe to say 
that, for one who would walk in to in- 
quire, half a dozen would pass along 
without learning of the price, whereas 
the marked article is seen by all. 

"The only objection I have to price 
marking," said one dealer, to the writ- 
er recently, "is that it loses a lot of 
business for you with the class of peo- 
ple who look at price only and do not 
think of quality. For instance, a man 
sees an article in my window marked at 
$2.25. Being one of the class of men 
who consider cheapness the most desir- 
able quality of all, he goes on to other 
stores until he sees something in the 
same line marked at $1.75. He imme- 
diately goes in and buys, the cheaper 
article. 

"Now, if the price had not been dis- 
played so that he could see the price 
for himself, that man would probably 
have come in to see me about it. I 
would then have had a chance to point 
out the good value behind the price, the 
superior quality of the article itself. If 
at all amenable to reason, he would 
buy the article exposed instead of hunt- 
ing up something cheaper in the same 
line. The one weakness of the marking 
system is, therefore, that it gives cus- 
tomers the chance to reach decisions by 
themselves, without appealing to the 
salesman within." 

To offset this, the price marking sys- 
tem draws trade to the store; which 
otherwise would have gone elsewhere. 
Two people will stop to look in a win- 
dow where prices are sown to one who 
would pause before a display of unmark- 
ed goods. The system results, there- 
fore, in interesting more people in the 
goods displayed than could be secured 
in any other way. If the prices are 
right, the amount of business resulting 
will absolutely discount any losses suf- 



fered as a result of people looking for 
cheap goods. 

Useful at Certain Seasons. 

The price card is particularly useful 
at certain seasons. It was found an im- 
portant factor during June when goods 
for wedding presents were very much in 
demand. A Montreal dealer states that 
one window display in his store window 
during the first two weeks of June 
brought him a most exceptional volume 
of business. He showed an assortment 
of cutlery, cut glass, silverware and 
brass goods tastefully arranged and 
with the price of each article clearly 
marked. The business done in such 
goods rather astonished, as well as de- 
lighted, this dealer. 

"In looking for a wedding present," 
he explains, "people know just about 



are seen where goods on counter and 
shelf are price marked, there is a ten- 
dency now toward the establishment of 
"specialty tables," where goods are 
placed, which sell at one price. This 
idea, borrowed from the departmental 
and the 5, 10 and 1 fv cent stores, is 
being followed by a great many, and it 
has proven a success in practically all 
cases. 

A dealer who has adopted the plan 
with considerable success is H. Occo- 
more, of Guelph. Mr. Occomore confines 
his stock to stoves and kitchen goods 
almost exclusively and lie has, there- 
fore, a smaller variety of goods to 
choose from for this purpose. He keeps 
a table in the centre of the store where 
small articles for table and kitchen use 
are displayed— tin cups, small sauce- 
pans, frying pans, etc. All goods on 
the table are sold for 10 cents, as a 
•large sign attests. 

"We get splendid results," explained 
Mr. Occomore. "The goods on the 
table are left pretty much to sell them- 
selves, and it is surprising how quickly 
the stock is sold out. The other day a 




A Window in a Western Store Showing 
Clearly.— Good Res 

what they want to pay for it, and that is 
about the only definite piece of informa- 
tion they carry around with them. Their 
ideas on the question of selection are 
vague. Consequently, when they see a 
display of goods suitable for the pur- 
pose, they look just at the price. 
Articles which do not conform to the 
financial terms they have settled upon, 
are passed over. Most people look for 
something which will cost about whal 
they want to pay. As a natural result 
the window display with prices shown 
will secure twice as much attention 
from wedding gift seekers as the one 
lacking in that essential." 

In the Store. 

This rule holds goods to a certain ex- 
tent in the store. Although few stores 
33 



; the Price of Each Article Marked 
ults Were Obtained. 

man came in to see me about, a matter 
of business and his eye had no sooner 
lighted on the goods on the table than 
he went over and gathered up an arm- 
ful — as many as he could possibly 
handle. 'We are holding a picnic to- 
day,' he said, 'and these things will 
just come in handy.' He bought sev- 
eral dollars worth of things which 
would come in handy for picnic pur- 
poses. ' ' 

Sells Aluminum Goods. 
Mr. Occomore also maintains a table 
of aluminum ware close by, on which 
each article is price marked. Despite 
the fact that aluminum comes higher 
than tinware or granite, these goods 
sell well and the displaying of the price 
certainly does not deter business in any 
sense. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO.. LIMITED 



JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN 



President 



Publisher* of Trad* Newspaper! which circulate In the Provinces 
•t British Columbia. Alberta. Saskatchewan. Manitoba. Ontario. Que- 
bec. Nova Scotia. New Brunswick. P.E. Island and Newfoundland 

CABLE ADDRESSES 
CANADA : Macpubco. Toronto. ENGLAND : Atabek. London. Eng. 

OFFICES 
Montreal 701-702 Eastern Townships Bank Building. Phone Main 1255 
Toronto - - 143-149 University Avenue- Phone Main 7324 

Winnipeg • • 34 Royal Bank Building. Phone Carry 2313 

Vancouver. B.C H. Hodgson. 11 Hartney Chambers 

London. Eng. • E J Dodd. 88 Fleet Street. E.C. Phone Central 12960 
New York R. B. Huestia. 115 Broadway. N.Y. Phone 2282 Cortlandt 

France John F. Jones & Co , 31bis Faubourg Montmartre. Paris 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada and United States. $2: Great Britain. 8s. 6d.: elsewhere. 12s. 

PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 



MAINTENANCE OF PRICES. 

New light was thrown on this much discussed question 
in the course of an address delivered by Mr. Rowley, of 
the E. B. Eddy Co. before the Ontario Wholesale Grocers' 
Guild in annual convention at Toronto. The Eddy Co. 
have for the past quarter of a century followed a "con- 
tract selling plan" by which they sell to the wholesaler 
at a set price and bind him to sell to the retail trade at 
no lower than the price fixed from time to time in their 
lists. 

This procedure was not in restraint of trade, argued 
Mr. Rowley, quoting to substantiate his remarks the judg- 
ment of the late Judge Kekewich in the case of Elliman 
vs. ( 'arrington. This celebrated case arose, through the de- 
fendant having purchased goods from the plaintiffs on an 
agreement not to sell the goods at less than a certain 
specified price and further not to sell unless a similar 
signed agreement were received from the retailer supplied. 
The defendant sold goods without procuring the required 
agreement and advanced the defence, that the contract 
was in restraint of trade. Judge Kekewich ruled out the 
defence, and concurred entirely in the claim of the plain- 
liffs (bat they had the right to control the price at which 
their goods were to be sold. The judgment read in part 
as follows: — "The plaintiffs are the manufacturers of 
Elliman 's Royal Embrocation for horses and cattle, and 
Elliman 's Universal Embrocation for human beings. They 
are not hound to sell the embrocation at all; they are not 
bound to manufacture it. They are at liberty to do as 
they please and when they have manufactured it they are 
at liberty to sell it at whatever price they choose to fix — 
it may be a prohibitive one, or it may be such a small 
price that they cannot make any profit out of it. That is 
entirely for their consideration, ('arrington & Son are 
minded to buy Elliman 's goods with a view to selling it 
again, that is, to buy wholesale in order to sell to others 
retail, and Elliman 's make a bargain with them that they 
shall not sell it below certain prices — that part of the 
bargain has not been broken — and that when they sell to 
ol hers they will procure from those others an agreement 
that they will not sell it below certain prices. Why 
should not Messrs. Elliman be at liberty to fix the price 
in that way? Nobody has argued, and it could not possi- 
bly be argued, that they are not at liberty to fix the price 
on the first sale to Carrington & Son. Why should they 
not be at liberty to make the further bargain with Car- 
rington & Son that they Should not sell it below a cer- 
tain price. It is said that it is in restraint of trade. Tn 
one sense it is, but it is just as much and no more in 
restrain! of trade for Elliman 's to say that they will not 
sell at all. It seems to me that what is restraint of trade 



as regards Carrington & Son is really the liberty of trade 
as regards Elliman 's. " 

A good many firms are now following the policy of 
fixing, and rigidly adhering to, resale prices. That they 
have a perfect right to do this seems to be unquestioned. 
That good results follow also seems assured, insomuch as 
many prominent manufacturers have achieved a wide 
measure of success by adopting this principle. 



KEEP STOCK UP TO MARK. 

It not infrequently happens that dealers allow certain 
articles to run out and do not discover the shortage until 
a customer makes demand for that particular article. 
This will happen in the best regulated stores unless there 
is co-operation among all members of the staff to keep 
the stock right up to the mark. What is needed is 
"team work," to borrow a phrase from the sporting 
writers. Each clerk should report to headquarters when 
he discovers that the supply of a certain line is running 
low. To make sure that he does not forget, the clerk 
should jot down a memo as soon as he discovers that any 
line has dwindled down. If this system were followed 
out systematically, it would do away with the possibility 
of shortages and likewise save the proprietor much work 
and worry. If followed still further, this system could be 
broadened to enable the buyer to know at any time ap- 
proximately what stock was in the store. He would then 
be protected from the danger of ordering too heavily, as 
well as from the possibility of being caught without any 
.'itock of certain lines. 

To make this co-operative system work easily, a 
"stock want book" should be provided. Place it at the 
disposal of each member of the staff, with instructions 
to enter particulars when any stock fell to the minimum 
mark set. Then follow the entries up by prompt order- 
ing and little trouble will ever ensue on the question of 
shortages. 

This want book could be used for a double purpose. 
Customers will frequently ask for articles which are not 
carried, and never have been carried, in the store. Let 
the clerks enter all such enquiries in the book, as well. 
The proprietor may find it to his advantage later to 
stock some of the goods thus called for. 



PRICE-CUTTER WAS CAUGHT. 

Price-cutting is never justifiable, except perhaps when 
it is desired to clear out old stock, which has been kept 
for some time and has depreciated in value. This neces- 
sity never arises if the dealer takes pains to see that 
nothing is at a standstill in his store and that his stock 
is kept moving. Price-cutting means the loss of a legiti- 
mate profit. It is doubly dangerous from the fact that 
it slowly undermines the price-cutter's own market. 

Some dealers are unwillingly led into it through fear 
of their competitors. "The other fellow will get all my 
trade if he sells below me," is the thought which prompts 
many men to slash their figures below the point where 
profits end and losses begin. A case of this nature came 
to the attention of the writer some few days ago. A 
customer entered the store of a small hardwareman and 
asked the price of turpentine. He protested loudly that 
the figure named was away too high. "I got a gallon 
last week at — (naming the dealer's closest competitor) — 
for 50 cents less than you ask." The dealer laughed 
at the idea, but the customer produced a bill and showed 
the price marked. "If he can sell at that price, I can,"' 
declared the dealer, stubbornly, and he poured out a 



34 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



gallon. The price he had himself paid for the turpentine 
was at least 20 cents more than he received, but he was 
prepared to make the sacrifice rather than let his com- 
petitor undersell him. As the customer was going out, a 
sudden thought struck the dealer. "Let me see that bill 
again," he said. "Look here, Mr. Brown, this price was 
for half a gallon. I thought there must be something 
wrong. We'll have to charge the regular price, after 
all." "I paid what you asked," said the customer, and 
he hurried out without further parley. 

It is worse than folly to endeavor to undersell others 
in the business. If your competitor is bound to hand 
over his profits, do not try to outdo him in his insane 
course. One sale at a fair profit is better than a whole 
day's output where no profit accrues. 



NO SALES TO REPORT, PERHAPS. 

Many of the proprietors of sporting goods 
stores in the province are making themselves 
liable to a fine of $50 for failing to make the 
returns to the Provincial Police, of all fire-arms 
sold during the three months ending June .50. The 
regulations are that the returns shall be made 
within seven days after June 30, and so far only 
a few have been received at the headquarters of 
the Provincial force. 
The above clipping is from a Toronto newspaper. 
The likely explanation of the failure of hardware and 
sporting goods dealers to make returns of their sales of 
revolvers and air guns is that they have no sales to re- 
port. Since the new Offensive Weapons Act went into 
force, dealers have not been selling revolvers, except in 
very rare cases. The writer knows of several men who 
always did a large business in revolvers, selling to none 
but responsible persons, but who have not made a sale 
since the new legislation went into force. 



ADVERTISEMENT CREATED SALES. 

A northern Ontario hardwareman states that he re- 
cently had demonstrated to him the usefulness of live 
newspaper advertising. Some months ago, he reverted 
to the once-a-week system, running a good-sized ad. every 
Friday. About, the time of the first really warm spell 
he advertised screen doors and window screens. The next 
day t here was a marked interest, shown in the subject. 
Practically every customer asked to see the stock, and 
he sold twenty-four screen doors, as well as a large num- 
ber of window screens — more than be had expected to sell 
in the first month. 

"It pays to advertise," was bis comment. It might 
be added: It pays to advertise — well. 



THE MOTOR-CYCLE TRADE. 

A writer in the Ironmonger makes the statement that 
a British retail firm sold over '200 motbr-Sycles last year. 
This incident shows to whal an extenl I he trade has 
grown in the Mother country and if also indicates that 
the hardware dealer is becoming the medium for the dis- 
tribution of motor-cycles. In commenting on the situa- 
tion, the writer says: "Thousands of cyclists will buy 
motor machines this year. There is no doubt about, that. 
Why, then, should the ironi iger not step in and appro- 
priate bis due share of the business? Moreover, there 
are the accessories, the petrol, and the insurance to be 



In Canada the motor-cycle has been fighting its way 
to a rather tardy recognition, but is gradually coming into 
its own. As a sport it is growing in popular favor and the 
demand for machines has shown a marked increase of 
late years. The hardwareman should keep his "weather 
eye open" and avail himself when the opportunity arises 
of the profitable business in this line. 

$ 



thought of." 



THE BINDER TWINE SITUATION. 

The extreme hot weather which prevailed until a week 
ago and the resultant lack of rain threaten to impair trade 
in several directions. It is reported that, a great many 
farmers are cutting their crops by mowers, with the re- 
sult that the call for binder twine has not been as heavy. 
One firm, which has always experienced in past years a 
particularly heavy demand for twine, report that so far 
their sales have fallen off by forty per cent. Other state- 
ments of a similar nature have been heard, although 
some dealers state that they think the late demand will 
even up matters. 

In order to stimulate demand, the firm mentioned have 
placed a man on the road to canvass orders for binder 
I wine. He has met with fair success and hopes to bring 
the sales for the year up lo the average. 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Handle leather belting and "rope in" the profits that 
are to be obtained. 

* * * 

A haul ware retailer sold 37 lawn mowers in three 
weeks. If he continues to do business at this rate, he 
will require a lawn mower to keep his coupons clipped. 

* * * 

Although considerable discussion has been heard on 
the score of resale prices of late, the question is by no 
means a new one. Some firms have fixed resale prices 
for the better part of half a century. 

* * * 

There is a silver lining to every cloud. The hardware- 
meu who suffered heavy losses in the Northern Ontario 
fires are now experiencing a heavy rush of business as a 
result of the building operations in the burned out towns. 

* * * 

der regularly for the past six weeks — according to the 
Although it has hit the hot loin rung of the price lad- 
prophets — turpentine is still going down. Its course has 
been too erratic, for accurate forecasting. 

It is about time to begin thinking of the shooting sea- 
son. August will not be long in passing, and the duck 
season will be opening, with bigger game following closely. 
It, is best to be well prepared lor this branch of the fall 
trade. 

* * * 

With the master painters in convention, Toronto might 

reasonably expeel a coating of vr<\, bid I he delegates have 

been so busy getting pointers on improved means of 

applying paint of all colors I hat they have not had time 

to devote lo that one special kind. 
* * * 

One lirm report an advance of fifty per cent, in paint 
sales after changing their painl stuck to a more favorable 
location in the store. II' the dealers, who slack up their 
painl, on dusty shelves behind rows of brooms, were to 
bring the stock out into I he light, they would soon find 
a. change lor the better in the results. 



35 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Aggressive Methods of Selling Seasonable Goods 

How Some Dealers Have Gone About Creating a Better Mar- 
ket for Certain Lines — One Hundred Sleighs Sold in One Day 
— How R. Copeland Cleared Out a Large Stock of Lawn 
Mowers. 



Many hardware dealers will si a to with 
ive finality thai good goods will 
sell themselves and that it is not neces- 
sary, therefore, to go to any particular 
trouble to sell goods other than to carry 
the best, ask a fair price and see that 
the customer gets prompl service. There 
is, of course, a certain amount of truth 
in this. A permanent business can be 
built up only by carrying the best of 
stock and thus ensuring satisfaction. 
At the same time, the sale of the best 
article on the market may prove slow if 
the dealer keeps his stock in the back- 
ground. Sales will be accelerated if the 
dealer does his best to keep the goods to 
the front and to feature them at season- 
able times. An article of good quality 
in daily use in the customer's house will 
advertise itself more effectively than the 
same article on the shelf in the hardware 
store. 

One of the secrets, then, of successful 
retailing is to draw the attention of the 
public to certain goods at the seasons of 
the year when those goods will be need- 
ed most. An effective window display, 
a catchy ad., will often bring a surpris- 
ing amount of trade, people buying who 
would otherwise never have thought of 
purchasing. 

An instance came to the attention of 
(he writer a few days ago. It may seem 
rather belated, but it is worth quoting, 
on account of the bearing it has on the 



question of the worth of store window 
displays. In the new store of the Bond 
I la id ware Co., Guelph, the store win- 
dows are of exceptional size and there- 
fore lend themselves to large displays of 
stock. Although the store was in what 
might be termed a transition stage last 
Christmas, it was found possible to use 
the windows and, a few days before the 
close of the Yuletide shopping rush, a 
display of sleighs was put in. The day 
before Christmas, there was a tremen- 
dous rush of business in that one line 
and by evening the window presented a 
sadly riddled appearance. No fewer 
than one hundred sleighs were sold on 
that one day, which certainly sets a 
record for the sale of goods of that var- 
iety. 

Big Sale of Screens. 
As an evidence of the power of print- 
ers' ink, reference may be made to the 
experience of Creeper & Griffin, Owen 
Sound, this spring. They advertised 
screen doors in one issue of the local 
papers and the next day sold twenty- 
four doors. This occurred early in the 
season and was, therefore, a striking 
manifestation of the salesmaking force 
of a well-written newspaper ad. 

Record Sale of Lawn Mowers. 
Here is another instance, illustrating 
the splendid results to be obtained where 
an energetic effort is made to push the 
sale of a certain line. This spring, R. 
Copeland, who conducts the J. H. Cope- 



33 j 


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L 


J 


4K ~ MOWERS* 


W ^ laWJSHhTn IP 


in 

a 

D' 
•A 

f 




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3i 'Jv 


LJ.MlMi ■ ■ - 
ARDY " a 


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M *rMTi ; p ""'fV ?*»- 







land hardware store on Queen West. 
Toronto, ordered a large supply of lawn 
mowers. They arrived about April '27. 
and Mr. Copeland at once set about cre- 
ating a demand for them. He dressed 
his window with samples of mowers, 
attaching to each the price in aluminum 
figures of good size. As will be seen by 
the accompanying illustration, the dis- 
play was well arranged and calculated 



LAWN MOWERS 




The window display of lawn mowers, dr essed by R. Copeland, Queen Street W., 

Toronto. 

36 



Before placing your order see our 
Lines 

WE OFFER 50 

Every Machine Guaranteed at the following prices : 
14 INCH 16 INCH 

Chicago $2.90 
Norka 3.75 4'00 

Star " 4.00 

Bull Dog 4.25 4.50 

Woody an 5.00 5.25 

W. B. Junior " S.25 

Empress 6. 75 

Diamond 7.25 

Diamond Special 18 inch 8.00 

J. H. COPELAND 

HARDWARE 
1424 QUEEN ST. W. 

Copy of blotter sent out to stimulate de- 
mand for lawn mowers. 

to attract attention. He then cast about 
him for some means of advertising the 
goods in his own particular section of 
the city. The daily newspapers, which 
covered the whole city, were not the 
medium he desired, as his business is 
confined largely to one section. He did 
not believe it would pay him to send 
around circulars, as it had been his ex- 
perience that people did not pay enough 
attention to them to bring the results. 
Accordingly, he hit upon the idea of 
blotters. He ordered a large supply, 
with printing on the back, as shown in 
the illustration, and sent them out to all 
the householders in that neighborhood. 
That both the window display and the 
blotter brought results was soon appar- 
ent. People came into the store and 
asked for mowers which they had seen 
in the window, for such and such a 
price. A large proportion of the sales 
were made in that way. Others came 
from sections quite a distance from the 
store, from people who could have se- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



cured mowers from dealers closer to 
home. This was due, Mr. Copeland be- 
lieves, to his "blotter campaign." 

By May 24, he had sold 37 mowers, 
representing in all about one hundred 
and sixty dollars — a heavy record for 
three weeks. Sales have continued 
since, though in smaller volume, and Mr. 
Copeland has only one mower left out 



of his large stock. His sales this year 
have been considerably more than double 
the number disposed of in past years. 

With such incidents adduced as 
proof, it is no exaggeration to say, that 
aggressive publicity methods will create 
a demand for new goods and stimulate 
the demand for old lines. A good win- 
dow display will catch the eye of people 



who had not given thought previously to 
the need of the particular article shown 
in that window. A good newspaper ad- 
vertisement will do the same. Such 
measures are peculiarly effective at 
seasonable times. "Strike while the 
iron is hot" is a good motto to remem- 
ber in pushing the sale of hardware 
lines. 



First Rain Storm for Drummers' Snack 

Tenth Annual Outing of Good-Fellow Organization Passes into History as Splen- 
did Success— Georgetown Seems to Be Ideal Place for Such a Gathering and 
Likely Will be Permanent — Travelers Attend From Far and Near — Toronto and 
Hamilton Both Win Ball Games — The Change of Officers. 



Georgetown, Ont., July 20. — Trials 
and tribulations, garbed in thunder and 
lightning and driving rain danced attend- 
ance at the tenth annual outing of the 
Drummers' Snack Club of Commercial 
Travelers, which was held in this town 




Boy Scouts in attendance at the Snack. 

on Friday and Saturday of last week, 
but though it all, the determination of 
the Knights of the Grip forced a way to 
cheerfulness and when the celebration 
came to an end on Saturday night the 
citizens of this place, in fashion unmis- 
takable, demonstrated that never before 
had they enjoyed a visit as much, while 
the drummers went home in similar good 
humor. 

Never, in all her history has George- 
town passed through a more strenuous 
two days, and when it was all over there 
were many merchants ready and anxi- 
ous to admit that they had never known 
the travelers before, at all. From the 
moment those salesmen from Toronto, 
Hamilton, London and other places 
in Western Ontario struck town to the 
time the last train bore away the 
"stickers" there was something doing 
every minute. All one has to do to get 
the picture, is to consider some drum- 
mer visitor in whom the spirit of banter 



(Staff Correspondence). 

— restrained, is apparent, and then think 
of him out in the free open, with nothing 
to sell and not a thing in the world to 
think about but fun; and then multiply 
that man about five hundred times. Un- 
less the writer is greatly mistaken the 
painting limned by imagination will re- 
present comic action spelled out in capital 
letters; and that was exactly what it 
was. A band of Comanche Indians, on 
the warpath, might have made more 
noise, but would not have been half so 
funny. 

The Georgetown Welcome. 

Then, too, the residents of George- 
town, from Mayor Grant down, entered 
so completely into the spirit of the 
affair, that if the visitors had chosen to 
put them under lock and key during 
their occupation of the town they would 
have considered it good fun. This gen- 
ial, whole-hearted reception gave the 
drummers room, literally speaking, to 
swing themselves, which they did, with a 
vengeance, and as may be imagined, 
Georgetown folks enjoyed it all almost 
as much as they did. And when it came 
time to vote at the annual meeting on 
Saturday mojning on the place of meet- 
ing for next year there wasn't a dissent- 
ing voice, and the manner in which 
G-E-O-R-G-E-T-O-W-N was spelled out 
showed that this spirit was fully appre- 
ciated. In fact, this town seems to be 
the ideal spot. It is reasonably close to 
Toronto, Hamilton, London and other 
centres, and is pleased to have the 
travelers come, and it is possible — prob- 
able even for that matter — that it will 
be the permanent "Mecca" of the men 
for some years to come, at least. 
The Annual Meeting. 
They were not such a bad-looking 
crowd either when the roll was called at 
8.30, at the annual meeting; maybe it 
was a little later than that; but not 
37 



much. And their heads were quite clear 
for the business was rushed through in 
speedy fashion. Letters of regret were 
read from one or two, and then the elec- 
tioneering began. Some of it was quite 
simple, for, generally speaking, the princi- 
pal officers merely took a step more. So, 
George Smye, of Hamilton, last year's 
vice-president, marched up to take the 
seat to be vacated by J. H. Wildfong 
and was acclaimed the new president ; 
William Meen, Toronto, took Mr. Smye's 
vacant chair, while George Campbell re- 
placed "Billy" as Toronto Secretary. 
"Charlie" Smye was re-elected to the 
Hamilton secretaryship. 

Robert Algie, recognized as the foun- 
der of the club, then pleaded to be re- 
leased from the duties of general secre- 
tary-treasurer, and said he thought the 
time had come when the Home Secre- 
tary, J. H. Willoughby, Georgetown, 
should undertake those duties. Charlie 
Smye, however, thought the Home Secre- 
tary had quite enough on his hands as it 




The famous Sol Walters holding down 
third sack. 

is, and so P. Mcintosh, of Toronto, was 
elected to fill Mr. Algie 's place, after the 
latter had been renominated for the 
chair and declined to act. "Bob," as he 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



is generally known, pointed oul thai he 

was only u;i\inu n|> a job, not severing 
liis connection with the Snack Club. The 
other officers are as follows: 

Home Secretary, J. II. Willoughby, 
Georgetown; Hamilton Executive, H. E. 
Smith, Win. Dore, S. Male, W. Pringle, 
P. A. Somerville, Col. Stoneman. 

Toronto Executive: C. A. Col well, Sol 
Wallers. Walter Madill, W. Mills. Wal 
ler Scot I, W. Sliaver. 

Executive at large: J. D. Abraham, 

London; II. II. Keimic, London; lit it 

Groskurth, Orangeville; 0. Wilder, 
Orangeville; Alex. Thompson, Guelph; 
W. Burch, Guelph; W. J. Moody, Berlin 
and Waterloo; Percy Wiggins, Owen 
Sound. 




STARTER "JACK" WILDFONG, 
TORONTO, 

Auditors: John Charles, Toronto; W. 
J. Reid, Hamilton. 

These elections had heen carried out 
under a new constitution. 

A satisfactory annual report was pre- 
sented as well as other minor ones. The 
number of club buttons sold for the out- 
ing was 544, of which J. J. Allan sold 
244, and the Snack in recognition of this 
fact, presented him with a beautiful sil- 
ver-trimmed cut glass bonbon dish. 

Invitations to the Drummers' Snack 
for 1912 were then given on behalf of 
Berlin and Waterloo, while Mayor Grant, 
of Georgetown, freely offered this village 
as the Snackers' stamping ground for 
next year also, and it was unanimously 
decided to hold the 1912 outing here. 

Toronto Wins Ball Game. 
The winners: — R. Asher. pitcher; 
Wylie, catcher; Geo. Arnold, R. Arnold. 
Smith, Gloucester, Barchard, Maltby and 
Easton. 



The IcserB:— Geo. Rush, pitcher; Mac- 

donald, G 'getown, catcher; (this order 

was reversed after the third inning) 

Corrigan, Dove, Wilson, Algie, Male, 

[Cerchar, Forgrave. 
Umpire, Arnold, of Georgetown. 

Another Ball Game. 
It wasn't long after this until the old(?) 
Fellows had refreshed the inner man, and, 
alter the great and only parade, in which 
Clown, and 1 leadsman, and Cardinals, 
and Potentates, and Kings, and Farm- 
ers, and Fools, and Ambassadors, and 
Queens, and the others, all walked in the 
mud in line, they began to knock chips 
off each others' shoulders, so to speak, in 
lining up for the indoor ball game, play- 
ed out in the park. Aii'am it was Hamil- 
ton and Toronto men who were arrayed 
against each oilier for the Wildfong 
Cup. This time (there is no doubt about, 
it) it was a ball game, for Hamilton won, 
(i to 5, and, Sol Walters played first has.' 
for Toronto. That should be enough in 
itself. There were many features in this 
game unknown in other contests. For 
one, "Mike" Malonc, after swatting a 
nice one in the second inning, got to first 
base in time to catch himself out. The 
Umpire 'lowed as how his intentions 
were good. 



Twenty Years Ago 

In the Canadian Hardware Trade 



The following items are gleaned from 
the columns of the July 25, 1891, issue 
of Hardware and Metal: 

The hardware merchants of St. 
John, N.B., have decided to give 
their clerks a half holiday on Fri- 
days, among those agreeing to this 
being, W. H. Thorne & Co, S. 
Hayward & Co., A. M. Rowan, 
Cowan. Ellis & Co., T. McAvity & 
Sons, F. A. Young, F. Beverly, Ed. 
A. Everett. Clarke, Kerr and 
Thorne. 

Editor's Note. — Many "of the firms 
mentioned in this list are still in busi- 
ness in St. John. 

Skead and Graham, hardware 
dealers, Winnipeg, have dissolved. 
C. W. Graham will continue the 
business. 

Edward S Farren, tinsmith, St. 
John, N.B.. is removing to St. 
George. 

Tin plate and sheet material gen- 
erally have occupied an artificially 
high plane of value throughout the 
spring and summer. This fact may 
be attributed to causes operative 

38 



several months ago, the principal 

one being over caul ions buying. The 

consequences is thai buyers gener- 
ally have paid considerably more 
for their material than they would 
otherwise have done by ordering 
last fall. The figures last year were 
$3.80 to *l.. r >n on cokes and $4.00 to 
$4.2.") on charcoals. This season 
cokes have run up as high as $4.75 
and charcoals $. r ) to $6. Within the 
past fortnight, however, matters 
are radically altered; supplies nego- 
tiated some time ago arriving with 
more freedom, and the stringency of 
I he market has been relieved 
Values have already eased off to a 
more normal position and now cokes 
are quoted at $.'i.7. r > to $4 and char- 
coal $4.25 to $4.50. 

Editor's Note: — It is interesting to 
note that plates to-day cost quite a lit- 
tle more than twenty years ago, as a 
comparison between present quotations 
and th.3 figures given above will show. 



NEW HARDWARE SPECIALTIES 
FIRM. 

I). N. O 'Byrne, manager of the Mer- 
chants' Hardware Specialties, Limited, 
Calgary, Alta., was a visitor at Hard- 
ware and Metal office, on Friday of last 
week. Mr. 'Byrne has spent five weeks 
in the East securing agencies for his 
firm, and he has made arrangements with 
several important manufacturers of 
hardware specialties. 

Mr. O 'Byrne will return to Calgary 
this week, and will lose no time in plac- 
ing his lines before the Western trade. 
Having covered Western Canada as a 
traveling salesman for a number of 
years, he is personally acquainted with 
nearly every hardwareman in the West. 



RETIRES AFTER 36 YEARS — RE- 
MEMBERED BY EMPLOYES. 

Montreal, July 18. — A very pleasant 
gathering took place on Saturday in the 
manager's office of the Montreal Rolling 
Mills Co.. when Geo. Luckhurst was pre- 
sented with a gold watch by his friends, 
the occasion being his retirement from 
a continuous service of thirty-six years 
with the Pillow & Hersey Mfff. Co., and 
later with the Montreal Rolling Mills 
Co., since this company took over the 
former. 

Mr. Luckhurst replied in a few well- 
chosen words, expressing his apprecia- 
tion of the gift, He will leave Montreal 
in September to spend a year in Eng- 
land, and will go receiving the very best 
wishes of all who were associated with 
him and the hope that he may enjoy 
every minute registered by the watch 
presented to him. 



Leather Belting Trade Leads to Other Business 

Leather Belting is Not Only a Lucrative Line in Itself to Handle, But it Brings 
Dealer in Touch With Manufacturers and Enables Him to Secure Business in 
Other Lines. 



The factory trade is very desirable 
from the standpoint of the hardware 
dealer. It covers a wide range; in fact, 
everything in the line of hardware is re- 
quired at some time or other in the fac- 
tory. As a means of getting in touch 
with the manufacturing demand, the re- 
tailing of leather belting will prove a 
valuable measure. 

In handling belting, the dealer comes 
into touch with the heads of manufac- 
turing concerns and departments. It 
means a more or less steady trade with 
the factories and the opportunity is 
thereby presented of getting other busi- 
ness. A hardwareman, located in one 
of the busiest industrial cities of Can- 
ada, relates how he managed to build up 
a profitable tinsmithing department 
largely as a result of factory patronage 
secured through his having supplied one 
manufacturing concern with supplies, 
including belting. He had been supply- 
ing this firm with tools and hardware 
specialties off and on for some years, 
but had been getting only a share of 
the trade. When he branched into 
leather belting, he found himself in sole 
possession of the local field, with the re- 
sult that he soon acquired the patron- 
age of the manufacturers. He had deal- 
ings regularly after that with the man- 
ager of the firm in question and pretty 
soon the latter was turning over more 
business to him in other lines than form- 
erly. This was due, he figured, to force 
of habit, as his name came to the notice 
of the manager more often than others 
in the same business. 

One day the manager accosted him 
with the remark: "I have considerable 
work for a tinsmith around here just 
now. You do that sort of work, don't 
you?" The retailer reflected. He kept 
a "handy man," who looked after the 
installing of stoves and did some tin- 
ning. He could, however, secure tin- 
smiths to do the work. "Yes," he re- 
plied. "I could handle the work for 
you." "Very well. Get the plans," 
said the manager, "and quote us your 
figure. If it is satisfactory, you can go 
ahead in a couple of days." 

His figure proving satisfactory, he 
hired a couple of tinsmiths and started 
work. When that contract was done, 
more work cropped up, some in the same 
factory, some elsewhere. He kept the 
two men on permanently. Then he add- 
ed a few more to his staff. Gradually, 
he worked up a large and lucrative busi- 



ness. To-day, he employs a dozen tin- 
smiths and keeps them busy almost ex- 
clusively in the factories. 

This incident illustrates what can be 
done when the dealer gets in touch with 
the heads of industrial departments. 
The way is opened for the transaction 
of new business on a large scale and the 
result is an equal measure of benefit for 
both retailer and manufacturer, the lat- 
ter benefiting from the fact that he is 
able to secure supplies almost at a 
moment 's notice. 

The Trade of Employees. 

The advantage derived by the dealer 
does not stop there, however. When he 
supplies the tools that a workman uses 
at his bench, the belting that runs the 
machine at the workman's side, the 
nails, the paint and the oil consumed 
each day in the factory, it is almost cer- 
tain that the trade of the workman him- 
self will go to that dealer. "I believe 
that half the men employed in the fac- 
tories here deal with me," said a West- 
ern Ontario hardware dealer, recently, 
"and this is due largely to the fact that 
the factory supplies come from my store 
almost exclusively." 

This, then, is an important consider- 
ation. The trade secured in that way, 
would compensate the dealer alone for 
any trouble that he had been put to in 
building up his connection with the 
manufacturers. 

How to Get Business. 

But to get back to the question of 
leather belting. It may be pointed out 
that the only reason why factory orders 
are so often placed out of town at the 
danger of tedious delay when they 
might have been filled in town, is that 
the managers are not aware that the 
local hardwaremen handle belting. In 
a majority of cases, they will be found 
quite willing to deal at home, if only 
for the reason that they will then have 
a ready source of supply at close hand. 
When the need arises in the factory for 
new belting, it is generally a pressing 
one. Delay in getting the order filled 
may mean delay in the factory opera- 
tions and this is a thing to be avoided at 
any cost. The home dealer has, there- 
fore, an argument in his favor which 
will meet and outweigh all other con- 
siderations. 

A wise course to pursue is for the 
dealer to take advantage of a spare 



hour here and there to run out and see 
the manager or purchasing agent of 
each local Factory. A few minutes' chat 
on the subject of the service that it is 
in his power to render the manufacturer 
should serve to bring a share at least of 
the trade in leather belting his way. 
When an emergency arises and a new 
supply is needed at once, the local deal- 
er will be called upon every time; for, 
to the manufacturer, time is money. The 
manufacturer, however, would not con- 
tinue to buy his supplies outside and 
call on the local dealer only in cases of 
emergency. He would be deterred from 
Ibis course by the palpable unfairness 
of it and in the end the dealer would get 
all the business. 

Handy Line to Handle. 

Leather belting has one advantage 
over a great many staple hardware lines. 
It is not bulky and in handling does not 
entail much time or trouble. It can be 
stored without using up much of the 
valuable space in the store — for space, 
to the average hardwareman, is valu- 
able. 

Furthermore, it is not necessary to 
tie up a large amount of capital in put- 
ting in a stock. A small stock would do 
to start and the amount could be en- 
larged as the business grew. 

The matter is well worth the consider- 
ation of every hardware dealer. The ex- 
perience of all who have taken up leath- 
er belting has been so uniformly suc- 
cessful that the step could not, in any 
sense, be termed an experiment. A 
reasonable measure of profit is assured 
in each case where the line is taken up 
with the energy which begets success. 



CARBORUNDUM BOOKLET. 

A booklet has been issued by the Car- 
borundum Co., of Niagara Falls, illus- 
trating the varied output of that com- 
pany. It is a very neat catalogue, print- 
ed on coated paper and is extremely 
creditable from the typographical stand- 
point. Among the different articles des- 
cribed are carborundum stones, sharpen- 
ing stones, razor hones, pocket stones, 
knife sharpeners, scythe stones, axe 
stones, engravers' pencil points, en- 
gravers' chucks, carvers' slips, wooden 
and aluminum boxes, carborundum paper 
and cloth and carborundum grains. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




results, and by live-thirty or six o'clock, 
the store is swept and made ready for 
the evening eity trade. After supper, 
the husy hours are between 8 o'clock 
and 10 p.m. in our store, the sales of 
household goods and mechanics' tools 
predominating. This is also pay night 
with us and one by one the boys call at 
the office and receive their weekly sal- 
ary and depart for the night. Entering 
I lie total sales in the cash book, we are 
now nearing the time for locking up and 
uoing home. "Weary, but undishonor- 
ed" and hoping for the gift of sleep. 



By "Mack." 
Our city was large enough to support 
a good weekly market and the farmers 
and residents of the small towns and 
villages, within a radius of fifteen or 
twenty miles, and sometimes during the 
Christmas holdays, much farther away, 
were attracted to town usually in large 
numbers. In the hardware store, Satur- 
day is a field day. The big double-col- 
umn "ad." "Saturday's Savings on 
Hardware," was prepared in the early 
clays of the week and published in the 
two city newspapers' weekly edition and 
in Friday's daily. Goods featured by 
this publicity are properly placed for 
the greatest convenience and the cut 
prices attached, the clerks are drilled 
and inspired to expect a successful day. 
Everything of which we have fore- 
knowledge, is done on Thursday and Fri- 
day to prevent the occurrence of an 
awkward incident, such as making the 
discovery that an advertised line had not 
arrived or was sold out. We want one 
hundred per cent, of our energy put into 
selling goods on Saturday. 

Generally, we asked about the weather 
on rising; followed by the inevitable 
query, "How's the market?" to the 
boys on reaching the store. A few 
words of encouragement are addressed 
to the staff and we retire to the office in 
the rear of the store to open mail and 
look through the trade paper. The cus- 
tomers are coming in early this morning, 
chiefly ladies who live in town. As ten 
o'clock nears, farmers, having sold their 
produce on the market are ready to 
trade. In ever increasing volume busi- 
ness rolls along until about 2 o'clock 
when it subsides. We have waited upon 
customers and greeted most of them 
ourselves, consulting the cash register at 
intervals during the day to ascertain 
the level of the cash sales and compare 
with the previous Saturday's takings. 
The time the clerks have to put up call 
orders is limited, but they utilize every 
minute and co-operate with each other 
to such advantage that few people are 
delayed in starting for home when they 
call for their goods. Three o'clock to 
five are good business hours in point of 



Hardware Letter 
Box 



Buttercup Churns. 
One of our readers recently asked for 
the name of the firm manufacturing 
Buttercup churns. As we were unable to 
secure this information we asked if any 
of our subscribers could supply it. We 
are now in receipt of a letter from the 
original enquirers, saying that several 
readers of Hardware and Metal have 
sent them the address of the firm. — John' 
Heard & Sons, Fenelon Falls, Ont. — 
Editor. 

Gasoline Sad Irons. 

Geo. H. McDonald, 514 Builders' Ex- 
change, Winnipeg. — "Could you give me 
the address of manufacturers of gasoline 
sad irons ?" 

Ideal Sad Iron Mfg. Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio ; Modern Specialty Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis— Editor. 

Brass Signs. 

Gus. A. Schmidt, Wingham, Ont.— 
"Kindly inform me through your col- 
umns, where I can procure brass signs." 

G. Booth & Son, 21 Adelaide St. W., 
Toronto ; Patterson & Heward, 319 
King St. W., Toronto.— Editor. 

Woodworkers' Putty. 

Lisle E. Mills, Campbellford, Ont.— 
"Will you kindly explain what wood 
workers' putty is ? To-day a customer 
inquired for it, and I was unable to talk 
with any amount of knowledge concern- 
ing same." 

Some years ago, a "woodworker's 
putty" was put on the market, made up 
largely of fine sawdust and glue, but it 
fell down. Practically all woodworkers 
now buy the best linseed oil putty, as 
it is almost pure white, and works bet- 
ter for the purpose than any other pre- 
paration. Being free from mineral pig- 
ments, it does not discolor the fillers or 
varnishes which may be used over it. It 
is just possible that the customer in 
40, 



question wanted a crack filler such as is 
occasionally used in cabinet making, 
though it does not harden the same as 
putty. 

Wire Baskets. 

J. B. Crawford, Dutton, Ont. — Let us 
know the makers of wire baskets for 
holding goods on bargain counters, size 
about 6 by 8 or 6 by 10. 

Canada Wire Goods Co., Hamilton; 
Dennis Wire and Iron Works, London; 
B. Greening Wire Co., Hamilton. — 
Editor. 

Offensive Weapons Act. 

R. F. Johnstone, Acton. — We have 
been in the habit of renting shot guns 
by the day in the fall season. How will 
this new law affect -this? Will we still 
be allowed to rent or must the parties 
have a license just for a day's shooting? 
In selling a gun to a farmer must he 
have a license the same as for a lawyer. 
Where are these permits issued? 

The Offensive Weapons Act does not 
specifically cover the case of renting 
shot guns, but, as the legislation is 
aimed to control the use of such weap- 
ons and the sale is restricted solely with 
that end in view, we take it that the 
authorities would consider the renting 
of shot guns without permits an in- 
fringement of the Act. The Act, as we 
interpret it, does not refer to rifles. 
Write to the Department of Provincial 
Police for a copy of the Act and at the 
same time refer the points in question 
to the head of that Department. 
Authoratative advice will make your 
permission stronger. Permits are sup- 
posed to be issued by the local police. 
If they are not informed on the matter, 
apply to the county high constable. Fail- 
ing there, apply direct to the provincial 
department. — Editor. 

"Fluxite." 

Luf kin Rule Co., Windsor. — ' ' Can you 
advise where to obtain "Fluxite?" 

This firm have no Canadian agent. 
Try jobbers. — Editor. 



INTEREST TRANSFERRED. 

In order to centralize the manufacture 
and sale of Rex Flintkote Roofing and 
their other waterproofing specialties, 
J. A. W. Bird & Co. have transferred 
their interests in these products to the 
Flintkote Manufacturing Co. The ex- 
change was made on July 15. The 
Flintkote Manufacturing Co. announce 
the personnel of the directorate of the 
new company as follows: Reginald W. 
Bird, Frederick C. Overbury, Wm. J. 
Smith, Chas. F. Abbott, Chester E. 
Bahr. 



Caterer or Slot Machine — Which ? 



By Victor Lauriston. 



"There— I've worked off 100 feet 
more of that old hose on a fellow. He 
wanted something good, and looked at 
this kind of suspicious, but I hit him 
with a good strong line of talk and he 
capitulated. Like enough it will last 
him pretty well, and anyway, I'm here 
to sell stuff." 

Have you ever said that,, thought 
that, or said or thought something 
pretty near to that, after watching a 
Customer depart with a dissatisfied look 
on his face, which says plainer than 
any words can say, that he's bought 
something against his own better judg- 
ment, and that he strongly suspects you 
have "done" him? 

Probably you never have. You don't 
sell, inferior goods. Still, incidents of 
that sort do sometimes happen, now and 
then. 

And the chap that's responsible for 
that sort of incident should stop a bit 
and think. If he does, he'll realize 
that there's more to salesmanship than 
merely exchanging goods for cash. A 
sale doesn't terminate with the snap- 
ping of the parcel cord and the tinkle 
of the cash register. 

Every sale has a far reaching effect 
on other sales. It may bring the casual 
customer back as a regular — or it may 
drive him elsewhere. It may build the 
store's business reputation one brick 
higher, or it may knock just a little bit 
off the top. 

Have you ever heard two or three house- 
wives gossip of an afternoon. They 
sit around and swap experiences — chat- 
ter about the latest epidemic of measles, 
the vagaries of the hired girl, and the 
faults and shortcomings of shop-keep- 
ers. Particularly the faults and short- 
comings of shopkeepers. And every 
now and then one woman will say: 

"I never will buy a thing from that 

M ■ again. He sold me a copper 

boiler the other day and I noticed there 
was a dint in it and I asked him if it 
would wear through and I was afraid 
it would and he was that positive it 
would never wear through — but it did, 
the second day I had the boiler on the 
fire." 

Then Mrs. Watkins recalls some 
wrong (probably imaginary) that 

M did her in the course of 

business. And Mrs. Smithers remem- 



bers that M sold her some Paris 

green that year it rained all the time, 
and the stuff was that weak, it never 
killed a single potato bug. 

Of course, the rain washed it off. M — 
is honest, probably. Doubtless the cop- 
per boiler's failure to last could be ex- 
plained. But the incident just shows the 
kind of missionarying a dissatisfied cus- 
tomer will do for you — particularly a 
customer who's bought against her own 
better judgment and finds that her judg- 
ment was right. 

Here are your goods. There is your 
customer. Your outstanding purpose as 
a salesman is to send them away to- 
gether. 

But that's not all the purpose. You 
should send them away satisfied that 
they are united in the bonds of busi- 
ness wedlock, and that there won't be 
any divorce decree to consider, or any 
condition of mutual incompatibility. 
Goods that are sold to a customer who 
is not satisfied with his purchase are 
only half sold. They mayn't come back 
— but they don't help to bring the cus- 
tomer back. 

You are behind the counter to sell 
things. But it pays to sell with at least 
a corner of one eye on to-morrow, in- 
stead of both eyes on to-day. 

For you're not behind the counter 
just to hand out goods and take in cash. 
If that were all a salesman's purpose, a 



slot machine behind the counter would 
serve as well. 

Your business is to cater intelligently 
to the buying public. 

If Jack Smith wants a pocket knife, 
your duty isn't done when you ask, 
"What price?" and shove a 50-cent 
knife, selected haphazard, across the 
counter. He may take a knife bought 
in that way, lay down his half-dollar 
and vamoose, but he won't go away 
satisfied. 

Find out for what purpose he wants 
this knife. Is it just to sharpen his 
pencils at school, or is he a healthy, 
vigorous lad who likes to slash around 
generally? Does he want a thick, strong 
blade, or a thin, finely-tempered one? 
Does an elaborate combination of knife, 
button-hook, nail-file and everything 
else appeal to him, or does he prefer to 
secure a single, thick, broad blade that 
will lop a fair-sized branch from a tree 
whenever he wants a home-made fishing 
pole? Find out what sort of a knife he 
needs, even if he doesn't volunteer the 
information, and give him exactly the 
thing that will satisfy his particular re- 
quirements. 

That's catering to the customer. And 
whether you sell nails or butter or em- 
broidery, catering to the customer — do- 
ing a little bit of extra work in order to 
send him away fully satisfied — is always 
the better salesmanship. Don't let him 
get the impression that you're a slot 
machine, set behind the counter to take 
his money and hand out his goods with- 
out any interest as to whether they suit 
or no. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



News and Methods of Canadian Hardwaremen 

London Hardwareman Buys Out Business in Toronto — Mari- 
time Convention — Waterloo Hardwareman Unanimously Elect- 
ed Mayor — Heavy Losses Sustained at Eganville. 



Toronto, (i. McLean, formerly of 
London, lias boughl out the hardware 
business of J. E, Wainwright, 305 Ron- 
eesvalles Ave., and lias now become set- 
tled in his new premises. Mr. McLean 
lias been in (lie hardware business in 
London for L8 years, firs! with the 
Sobbs Bardware Co., ami latterly Cor 
himself. He, therefore, brings to liis 
new business a wide experience in every 
branch of the trade. 

Mr. McLean lias made quite a number 
of changes since taking hold, and in- 
tends to make more, lie lias put in new 
fixtures and showcases and has stocked 
many new lines. At the present time 
he carries a full assortment of general 
hardware, tinware, graUiteware, stoves, 
paints, cutlery, cut glass, etc., and it is 
his intention to put in brass goods, 
nickel-plated ware, bathroom accessories, 
and similar articles. "I will put in a 
new showcase at the front of the store," 
he explained, "and show these new 
lines there. Goods of that description 
need good display position." 

Other changes intended are the in- 
stallation of a new office at the back 
of the shop and the starting of a tin- 
shop. 

Gordon Wall, who was with him in 
London for years, but who has latterly 
been with the Somerville Hardware in 
Edmonton, has returned with Mr. Mc- 
Lean, and will act, in the capacity of 
traveler. While in London, Mr. Wall 
was in charge of the cutlery and sport- 
ing goods department, and gained valu- 
able experience. 

MADE CHANGES IN STORE. 

Guelph — D. L. Myers, who recently 
acquired the hardware business here of 
McMillan Bros., and is now conducting it 
under the name of the Guelph Hard- 
ware Co., has made a number of changes 
in the store. It has been painted both 
interior and exterior. The stock has 
been changed around, and the fixtures 
altered to give more room in the store. 
He contemplates making other altera- 
tions later on. 

Mr. Myers is continuing the advertis- 
ing campaign of McMillan Bros., and 
is using good space in the daily papers. 



MARITIME CONVENTION. 
St. John, N.B.— John A. McAvity, of 
the firm of T. McAvity & Sons, return- 
ed this week from Digby, N.S., where 
he was in attendance at the Maritime 



Hardware convention. The sessions had 
been well attended, he said, and the con- 
vention had been entirely successful. 
Mr. McAvity had the honor of being 
elected president. Other local firms 
were represented l>v the following: John 
II. Tilfon, of W. H. Thome & Co.; F. 
K. Murray, of Emerson & Fisher, and 
Geo. C. Weldon, of the S. Hayward Co. 
Contrary to the expectations of a great 
number of citizens, the common coun- 
cil, at a special meeting this week, called 
to consider the matter, did not repeal 
the by-law compelling storekeepers to 
(dose at 7 p.m., although a largely-signed 
petition, asking for its repeal, was pre- 
sented to the aldermen. Out of fifteen 
in attendance, only three aldermen voted 
in favor of the repeal. The matter is 
now before the police magistrate, who 
is asked to give judgment in several cases 
pending before him, wherein dealers in 
all lines of business have been reported 
for not abiding by the law. 



HEAVY FIRE LOSSES. 

Eganville. — The heavy fire here has re- 
sulted in heavy losses, among the mer- 
chants who suffered being John C. Cour- 
ley, whose tinware and furniture store 
on the west side of the bridge was burn- 
ed. The loss was $4,500, covered by in- 
surance to the extent of $1,800. 

In the Robertson Reeve block, on the 
north side of the river, J. Mclntyre's 
hardware store suffered. The loss on the 
slock was estimated at $2,800, with no 
insurance. Watson's hardware store was 
also gutted. The building, which was 
owned by J. A. Acton, of Ottawa, was 
damaged to the extent of $4,500, with 
insurance of $2,500. Mr. Watson's stock- 
was insured to the extent of $2,000, and 
the loss is estimated at $7,500. 

SELLING HOT WEATHER GOODS. 

A number of hardware dealers have 
been making full use of the opportunity 
presented of late by the extremely warm 
weather to feature goods suitable for 
such conditions. 

The Orillia Hardware Co., Orillia, 
Ont., have been advertising such goods 
as ice cream freezers and hammocks. 
One of their latest ads. reads: "Keep 
kool. Can't. Yes you can, if you buy 
one of our ice cream freezers and re- 
cline in our hammocks made for hot 
days." They used double-column space 
and found that sales in the lines men- 
tioned were highly satisfactory. 

42 



The Wood-Vallance Hardware Co., 
Nelson, B.C., have been advertising: 
"(let a tent. If you cannot go camping 
put it up in your own garden and enjoy 
sleeping in the open. We stock all sizes 
up to 12 ft. by 18 ft." Best results have 
also been obtained in this instance. 



ELECTED MAYOR. 

Waterloo, Ont.— W. J. Weichel, hard- 
wareman, was unanimously elected mayor 
of Waterloo, to take the place of Levi 
Graybill, deceased. No other names 
were placed in nomination. 

(Editor's Note. — Further particulars 
will be given in next week's issue.) 

AN EARLY CLOSING BY-LAW. 

Montreal, July 18. — The merchants of 
this city are very much interested in the 
quest ion of early closing now pending 
before the council. If the by-law read 
for the first time at the meeting of the 
City Council yesterday afternoon be- 
comes effective the stores of the city will 
have to close three nights, instead of 
two nights a week, which is the present 
regulation. 

It is proposed to add Tuesday to Wed- 
nesday and Thursday of each week when 
stores must cease business at 7 o'clock. 
The purpose is to give the retail clerks 
three nights off every six days. 

The hardware stores are, of course, 
included. Some hardware dealers be- 
lieve it would be a good idea, but others 
here are very strictly opposed. 



HARDWARE OPENINGS. 

The Grand Trunk announces openings 
for hardware stores at Atwater, Eben- 
ezer, Gerald, Landis and Yarbo, all in 
Saskatchewan. 



STRUCK BY LIGHTNING. 

Fredericton, N. B. — A heavy electric 
storm passed over this city on July 7 
and a heavy bolt of lightning struck the 
roof of J. S. Neill & Sons' hardware 
establishment. The chimney was split 
in two and some shingles were torn up, 
but no fire resulted. The fire brigade 
made a run to the store, but were un- 
able to find anything wrong. The store 
was closed at the time for the regular 
Thursday half-holiday. 

MANUFACTURING CANS. 
J. H. Copeland and his son, R. Cope- 
land, retail hardware dealers, Queen 
Street west, Toronto, have started into 
the manufacture of cans for paint and 
baking powder under the name of the 
Copeland Can Works. J. H. Copeland 
is taking charge. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Ontario. 
W. G. Weichel is visiting in Gait. 
J. Buchanan, Gait, was in Toronto on 
a business trip this week. 

E. Fielding, Toronto, has been enjoy- 
ing a short holiday at, Chateauguay. 

The store of Aikenhead's, Limited, 
Toronto, is being painted and redecor- 
ated. 

A by-law will be submitted to the 
ratepayers at Orillia to fix the assess- 
ment of the National Hardware Co. at 
$4,000. 

Edgar Goslin, of the Taylor Safe 
Works, Toronto, had his right leg 
fractured as a result of a safe door 
falling on the limb. 

Geo. Taylor, of the Geo. Taylor Bard- 
ware Co., is on a tour of Europe. A let- 
ter has been received from him at Dub- 
lin. 

R. T. Smith, an employee of the King 
Hardware Store, Chatham, has severed 
his connection anil has accepted a posi- 
tion with the Willard Hardware Co. 

The Geo. 0. King Co., Woodstock, 
have received a large order from New 
Zealand for vacuum cleaners. This will 
make the first shipment of this line of 
goods from Canada to New Zealand. 

Frank Smith, clerk in Morgan 's 
hardware store, Norwich, was assisting 
in moving a stove and was walking 
backwards, when he stumbled and fell 
on his arm, fracturing it. 

T. Parke, of Keewatin, has secured 
an injunction to restrain the Keewatin 
Hardware Co. from proceeding with the 
erection of a gasoline tank near the 
town dock. 

The store of 1). Pike, 123 King street 
east, Toronto, was broken into a few 
nights ago and a large quantity of goods 
taken away, including revolvers and 
knives. An arrest has been made. 

Mr. Burton, manager of the J. F. 
Kearns store. Saskatoon, was a visitor 
in Toronto this week. He called on the 
manufacturers and wholesalers before 
leaving for Montreal. He will call 
again at Toronto on his return trip. 

F. W. King, who has been superin- 
tendent of the McClary foundry in Lon- 
don, south end, for eight years, has re- 
signed, and will leave after August 1 
for Fort William, where he will take 
over a stove manufacturing business. 

Woodstock merchants have responded 
promptly to the call for help for the 
unfortunate people in the Porcupine 
district. A car load of supplies has 
been sent, among' the merchants who 
subscribed being Gardner & Co., A. Mc- 
Donald, R. McKiggan, hardware dealers. 



It is stated in the Eganville Leader 
that manufacturers in that section are 
hard pressed to keep up with the demand 
for refrigerators. The Renfrew Machin- 
ery Co. will shortly start, on the founda- 
tion of an addition that will make their 
factory just about double its present, 
size. They are badly cramped for room 
under present, conditions. 

That some hardware men are branch- 
ing into the automobile business is 
shown by the following note from the 
Parkhill Gazelle: "Dr. G. W. Racey 
has purchased a Hupmobile from The 
Steele Hardware Co., the local agents of 
that car. Dr. Wilson accompanied Dr. 
Racey to Windsor on Monday to receive 
the car and arrived with it on Wednes- 
day evening." 

The Walkerville Hardware Co. has 
been incorporated to carry on the busi- 
ness of wholesale and retail dealers in 
hardware, manufacturers' and mill sup- 
plies, sporting goods, and as plumbers, 
steamfitters and tinsmiths. The capital 
stock is $60,000. The new company 
takes over the business of the Walker- 
ville Hardware Co., a co-partnership 
composed of Abram Davis Green and 
James Richard Coate, both of whom are 
provisional directors of the new con- 
cern. 

Quebec. 

A. G. Laviolette's hardware store was 
burnt out in (he recent severe fire at 
St. Jerome. 

Walter 11. Cottingham, president of 
the Sherwin-Williams Co. of Canada, 
sailed for Europe this week. 

Upon the trial trip of the new steam- 
er "Saguenay," William H. Evans, of 
the Canada Paint Company, had the 
honor of receiving an invitation to join 
the president and directors of the Riche- 
lieu & Ontario Navigation Company. 

Western Provinces. 

E. N. Wakely, formerly of Lethbridge, 
is building a tinshop at Cardston, Alta. 

The Whiting Hardware Co. have open- 
ed a branch at Winnipeg. 

The Souris Hardware Co., it is re- 
ported, have sold out to T. & J. Field. 

Charles Yeoman is discontinuing his 
hardware business at Blue Hill, Sask. 

The Vickei-s Bros. Co. are commenc- 
ing a hardware business at Calgary. 

A plant for the manufacture of Wiz- 
ard furnaces and heaters will be estab- 
lished at Winnipeg. 

The Warnken Hardware Co., Winni- 
peg, have changed their name to the 
Cobban Hardware Co. 

W. A. Oliver, of Ochre River, Man., 
43 



is reported to have sold his hardware 
business to Kchoop Bros. 

W. F. Priper, hardware dealer, of 
Swalwell, Alta., has been succeeded by 
Wilson & Wilson. 

Kidd & Clements, Rocanville, have 
improved their store front by widening 
the door space and putting in double 
doors. 

A new hardware store has been open- 
ed at, Me rid, Sask., by Evans & Co. 
They are carrying a large and complete 
stock. 

E. E. Marsh, of Winnipeg, is opening 
a painting- business at Battleford, in 
connection with the Battleford Hard- 
ware Co. 

The 11. McKenzie Hardware Co., 
Scott, Sask., have installed a complete 
equipment of tools for tinsmithing, and 
are opening a, tinning department. 

The Wood-Vallance baseball team de- 
feated the Ashdown nine in a five-in- 
ning game by 11 — 2, and thereby 
"cinched" the championship of the 
Winnipeg' Wholesale Mercantile League. 
They have won nine games and lost 
none. 

The annual picnic of the Ashdown 
Hardware Co., Winnipeg, was held at 
Hyland Park on Friday, July 14. The 
lull staff of all departments left, on the 
Winnitoba, leaving the city at 1.30 and 
returning about 10 p.m. About 300 were 
in attendance. A list, of sporting events 
were run off, handsome prizes being 
given. 

Maritime Provinces. 

R. -J. McNeill, Summerside, has in- 
stalled a gasoline tank and pump in 
connection with his store. 

Definite arrangements have been clos- 
ed lor the transfer of the Gordon Nail 
Works from St. John, N.B., to Calgary. 
Quite a number of workmen will move. 

Two men have been arrested for the 
recent, burglary in S.' A. Crowell & Co. 's 
hardware store at Yarmouth. Manager 
II. S. Crowell and Morton Pellett, book- 
keeper, identified revolvers found on 
the men as having been stolen from the 
store. 



NEW COMPANIES. 

The Canada Rex Spray Co., has been 
incorporated with headquarters at 
Brighton, and a capital stock of $40,- 
000. The company will manufacture 
fruit tree spray material, etc., and carry 
on a manufacturing cooperage. 

Alonzo W. Spooner, Ltd., has been in- 
corporated to carry on the business now 
conducted by Mary Ann Spooner in the 
name of Alonzo W. Spooner, manufac- 
turing- copperine, solders, metallic pack- 
ing, etc. head office, Toronto; capital 
stock, $40,000. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN METAL MARKETS 

See Itemized Market Quotations on Page 52. 



MARKETS IN BRIEF. 
Montreal. 
Turpentine — Down 3c. 
Linseed Oil -Down lc. 
Tin Reduced to 47c. 
Spelter Up 25c to $6.25 per 

CWt. 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 21. — The midsummer 
metal situation is devoid of any par- 
ticular feature, but is generally consider- 
ed satisfactory as the amount of busi- 
ness transacted is well up to the mark. 
During the past week tin has declined 
and the local price is now 47c. Spelter 
shows a little increase. The other mar- 
kets are steady. Pig iron is practically 
unchanged from the position it has held 
for several months now. Quietness is 
still the characteristic of the iron mar- 
kets across the border and in the Old 
Country there is little new. Prices have 
advanced about a shilling, but it is said 
that purchases can still be made at form- 
er figures. 

Pig Iron. — There is a little improve- 
ment in the situation in the United 
States, but it is not appreciable. Can- 
adian conditions are reported practically 
the same as when last referred to, but 
generally speaking there is little new. 
Business is reported satisfactory enough 
here, all of which is worthy of note. 
Prices are as follows: 

Tin. — It seemed that early this week 
the prices of tin in England were being 
reduced, possibly to stimulate interest. 
Locally the price is down one cent a 
pound, and is quoted at 47, having ruled 
at a higher level for some time now. 
The demand is steady, but is not for 
large quantities. 

Copper. — This market is unchanged, 
witli, if anything, a little easier feeling. 
Demand is steady here, being on par 
with the demand during previous weeks. 

Spelter. — This metal is quoted at $6.25 
per 100 lbs. this week, being an advance 
of 25c on last week's figures. The mar- 
ket is steady, with demand much the 
same as that which has been formerly 
referred to. 

Lead. — There is no change in; this 
market. Prices are steady, the demand 
is normal, and in the primary market 
conditions are reported a little easier. 

Old Metals. — Demand for old metals 
is fair. Prices are as follows: 

Heavy copper and wire, lie; heavy 
red brass, 10c; heavy lead, 2%c; light 
copper and bottoms, 9c; tea lead, 2IV2C; 
machinery cast iron , No. 1, $14.50; No. 



1 wrought iron, $12.50; malleable, No. 
1, $9; miscellaneous steel, $5; stove 
plate, $12.50. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 20.— The trade is still 
quiet but the indications at present all 
point to an early resumption of activity 
all along the line. In the first place, 
two more weeks of the present brand of 
weather will assure a bumper crop in 
the West, with all that entails. A full- 
est measure of prosperity in the indus- 
trial world will follow a bountiful 
harvest in the Western provinces. In 
the second place, conditions are slowly 
lint surely improving in the United 
States. As the depressing influence of 
the American market has been the sole 
drag on the wheel of Canadian progress, 
its removal will mean immediate im- 
provement all along the line in Canada. 

Tin. — The high level is still main- 
tained, the local price remaining around 
48 cents. Stocks in local hands are 
light and, as business continues reason- 
ably brisk, the situation is, on the whole, 
satisfactory. It is not thought at all 
probable that lower prices will be real- 
ized soon. The London syndicate ap- 
pear to have just as complete a hold of 
the market and the sources of supply as 
ever and they can keep the price up as 
long as it suits them to do so. 

Antimony. — The demand is not large 
and only a languishing interest is shown. 
The buyers are not showing any par- 
ticular haste to place orders and the im- 
mediate future does not appear to hold 
forth any particular promise of renewed 
activity. The price remains the same. 

Plates and Sheets. — Bookings continue 
good and local jobbers report that there 
is a rather better demand now. As 
stocks are low, it is a reasonable assump- 
tion that active conditions will soon dis- 
place the present semi-lethargic condi- 
tion which is due almost entirely to the 
season. 

Copper. — There are no developments 
to note in copper. The price remains 
the same and it cannot be said that the 
amount of business doing has seen either 
an advance or a falling off. Opinions 
as to the future differ so widely that it 
is difficult to say just what is to be ex- 
pected. On the whole, perhaps, opinions 
seem to be fairly optimistic. Price 
changes are not anticipated. It is hoped 
that a few weeks more will see buyers 
coming on the market for larger bulk. 

Pig Iron. — The demand is growing 
nicely. Most foundries are now running 
briskly and in consequence the demand 
44 



tor pig iron is likely to be both larger 
and better sustained. The activity not- 
ed in the stove industry has doubtless 
had considerable bearing on the pig iron 
market. Prices still rule as follows: 
Canadian Foundry No. 1, $19 and No. 2, 
50 cents a ton less. Old Country iron is 
quoted at $19.50 for Middlesboro No. 3, 
and $20.25 for Clarence No. 3 ; Summer- 
lee No. 2 is $22, and Cleveland No. 1, 
$20.50. Jarrow and Glengarnock irons 
are at $20 and $22 respectively. 

Lead. — The tone of the lead market 
is strong. There is an excellent de- 
mand and, as the consumers have light 
stocks to work on, it is assured that the 
trade will continue quite as briskly as 
at present. The price remains firm. 

Spelter. — General satisfaction is ex- 
pressed with the spelter situation. Con- 
ditions here are much more satisfactory 
than on the other side of the border line. 
Orders are fair-sized and in sufficient 
volume to make a satisfactory output. 
The price is firm. 

Old Metals. — There is a busier tone 
in this, part of the metal market. De- 
mand is good at the present time. We 
still quote: Heavy copper and wire, 
IOV2C to lie; heavy red brass, 7 x /2c; 
heavy lead, $2.90; light copper and bot- 
toms, 9%c; tea lead, $2.40; machinery 
cast iron, No. 1, $14; No. 1 wrought, $10; 
malleable No. 1, $8 to $10 ; miscellaneous 
i-teol, $6 to $7; stove plate, $12.50. 



McCLARY'S HOLD OUTING. 

London, July 17. — Two special trains 
carried the employes of the McClary 
Manufacturing Co. to Port Stanley, 
where the annual outing was held. In 
all, about 2,500 people went along. The 
committee in charge had made most com- 
plete arrangements and the day's pro- 
gramme passed off most successfully as 
a result. On the way down a box of 
candy was handed to everyone on the 
train. 

The afternoon was featured by a 
baseball match between the north and 
the south, which the southerners won 
by a score of 4 to 1. Running and 
novelty races were held and the keenest 
rivalry was displayed. 

The committee was composed of J. 
Wright, chairman; L. Hill, secretary; 
F. Westbury, J. C. Slyford, W. Ballard, 
A. Ralph, H. L. Milligan, C. Pirie, C. 
W. Manning, E. Snelling, W. Hogg, F. 
Turner, assisted by the following: 

Executive — Jas. Pirie, J. Wyse, W. H. 
Hayden. 

Railway— G. Moll, J. M. Pirie, A. E. 
Robinson. 

Printing — H. Findlater. C. Burns, A. 
E. Denney. 

Candy — W. H. Hayden, Miss Robin- 
son, Mrs. Mascario. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 21. — Business is rather 
uneventful, but it is steady, and, if any- 
thing, is better than last week. The gen- 
eral demand has suffered no particular 
depreciation and the smile of satisfac- 
tion is as broad as ever. Recent rains 
have meant thousands of dollars to the 
trade. They were very opportune and 
the money they will bring the farmers 
should find its way, or at least a share 
of it will, to the wholesale hardware 
trade. The general sorting-up orders are 
numerous, and the demand for household 
goods of certain kinds is good just now. 

Household Utensils — Preserving time 
has created a good demand for preserv- 
ing utensils. Graniteware kettles and 
boilers, preserving jars and such articles 
have been going well, and other house- 
hold goods are moving satisfactorily. 
Some of the prices quoted are : Food 
choppers, from $9 to $15 a doz. ; ice 
cream freezers, 1-qt., $1.50, 2-qt. $1.65, 
3-qt. $2.05, 4-qt. $2.50, 6-qt. $3.15, 8-qt. 
$4; coffee percolators, $1.75 to $3.50; 
washing machines, from $3.50 up ; wring- 
ers, Royal Canadian, $47.75 per doz., 
Universal $37.75 per doz., Safety $56.25 
less 20 per cent, per doz.; Mrs. Potts' 
irons, plain 82y 2 c per set, nickel-plated 
87y 2 c per set; common sad irons, 4 to 7 
lbs., $5 per cwt. 

Harvest Tools — Enquiry for harvest 
tools does not show much of a falling 
off yet, the bulk of business being good. 
Hay forks, manure forks, straw forks, 
barley forks, spading forks, potato forks, 
field and garden hoes, Dutch weeding 
hoes, garden rakes, 50 and 5 p.c. ; hay 
takes, $1.15 to $2.75 a doz.; scythes, $6 
to $8 a doz.; sickles, $1.85 to $2.25 a 
doz.; grass hooks, $1.65 to $2.10 a doz.; 
snaths, 40 p.c. discount. 

Contractors' and Builders' Goods — 
There is still a good demand for railway 
supplies and contractors and builders 
have by no means let up. Business in 
this department is quite favorable. For 
the best quality of shovels and spades, 
the discount off is 60 and 2y 2 per cent.; 
for second quality the same discount is 
allowed, and for third quality the dis- 
count is 50 and 2y 2 per cent. ; picks are 
quoted at from $3.85 to $5 a doz. ; crow- 
bars are listed at $3.25 a cwt.; wheel- 
barrows, navvy common, $21 and up; 
navvy full-bolted, $22.50; drag scrap- 
ers, $5.75 and upward. 

Seasonable Lines — A good business is 
still reported in various lines that may 
be included in this department. Lawn 
and verandah goods are included in sort- 
ing-up orders and other lines are equal- 
ly sought after. 



TORONTO. 

\ Toronto, July 20. — Conditions have 
been exceptionally active for this sea- 
son of the year. As a general rule, the 
latter end of July sees a very perceptible 
slackening in business, which continues 
through pretty well until the first of 
September. So far this year there have 
been no indications whatever of this 
late July slump; on the contrary, the 
general state of trade this week seems to 
be better than for some little time. The 
activity is spread pretty well over all 
lines. 

Add to the general briskness of the 
hardware market the fact that the fires 
in the north country have created a 
heavy demand there, and it will be un- 
derstood that the past week has been 
a busy one for the jobbing houses with 
every indication of a continuation of 
like conditions. 

Prices are reported to be firm in all 
lines. 

Seasonable Goods. — The demand for 
such lines as wire netting, screen doors, 
hose, etc., which received a remarkable 
stimulation as a result of the extreme 
heat of a couple of weeks ago, has sub- 
sided again. There is now practically 
"nothing doing" in any of these lines. 
Ice cream freezers are still selling well, 
and orders are being placed for refrig- 
erators in fairly good bulk. In the case 
of the latter, the demand is for the 
trade which the fall equipment of new 
houses will create. It is still difficult 
to secure the necessary supplies to fill 
orders for the cheaper grade of refrig- 
erators. 

Household Goods. — There is a dis- 
tinctly heavy demand for all varieties of 
enamelware, tinware and graniteware. 
The women folk are now preparing for 
the preserving season, which is now close 
at hand. There is, as a result, a good, 
hustling demand for preserving kettles, 
cherry stoners, kettles, etc. Woodenware 
is also moving well. 

There has been a consistent demand 
for the cheapest kinds of table knives 
and forks, plates, pots and pans, for use 
in summer cottages and camps. The 
call has come largely from sections 
favored as summer holiday sections. 

Harvest Tools. — Although the demand 
is still brisk, it is stated that, after an- 
other week trade in this department will 
fall off. As a direct result of the ex- 
treme heat, the crops have come on 
earlier than usual, and the retail trade 
has been correspondingly in advance. 
Orders for forks, scythes, etc., have 
been heavier than usual this year. 

Builders' Hardware.— There is a 
steady advance noted here. Building 

45 



operations are now reaching the stage 
where hardware is used largely and the 
demand on the retailer has become 
heavy. The jobbing houses report full- 
est satisfaction with the returns in this 
department to date. 

Heavy Hardware. — There is a firm 
and active tone noted. Bolts, nuts, 
screws, rivets, nails, etc., are all show- 
ing healthy activity, the demand being 
now large and well sustained. Present 
quotations are : Discounts on carriage 
bolts, % and less, 60 and 10 and 10; 
coach screws, 75; stove bolts, 80 and 
7%. 

Stoves and Heating Goods. — The im- 
pression is gaining ground that the de- 
mand for stoves is going to be a record 
breaker this year. The significant state- 
ment is made by one manufacturer that 
the orders placed to date are so heavy 
that it is doubtful if the manufacturers 
will be able to handle more than the 
business now actually placed. The 
situation in all parts may not quite mea- 
sure up to this estimate, but it indicates 
that advance business has reached record 
proportions. Some stoves are already 
being shipped. Business in other heat- 
ing lines remains good. Plates are be- 
ing sold in large bulk for camping pur- 
poses. Gasoline and oil stoves are in 
demand for the same purpose, but gas 
stoves are now practically out of season 
as far as actual sales go. 

Sporting Goods. — With the vacation 
season in full swing, the demand for 
fishing tackle, baskets, boots and gen- 
eral supplies for the angler has seen a 
marked advance. There is also a grow- 
ing demand for rifles and fall hunting 
goods. 



ASHDOWN'S PICNIC. 

Winnipeg, July 17. — The annual picnic 
of the J. H. Ashdown Hardware Co. was 
held at Winnipeg Beach, Friday, July 
14. Over 600 people attended the ex- 
cursion, and had a very enjoyable trip. 
The growth of the Ashdown Hardware 
Co. is typical of the growth of the west. 
Starting from a small store in 1870, Mr. 
Ashdown has built up a business which 
is one of the finest in the west to-day. 

Amongst the party were not only the 
heads of the different departments, but 
Mr. Ashdown himself, who is president 
of the company. He spent the day 
amongst his employes and customers, 
taking part in the games and sports with 
the rest of them. Numerous friends of 
the employes were also out for the day, 
and in spite of a few showers of rain 
were able to amuse themselves all right. 
The party returned home at midnight 
after enjoying a delightful dance at the 
pavilion. 



[I A R 1) \\ A R l«: AND METAL 



The Western Hardware Market Situation 

The Crop Situation is Being Closely Watched — Big Demand 
at Present for Binder Twine — Harvesting Supplies are Very 
Active — General Tone of Business Good. 



Winnipeg, July 17— The eyes of the 
business world of the west are all cen- 
bered on the growing crop at the pre- 
sent time. The situation Is .such that 
the leaping of a crop, which as lar as 
quantity is concerned the likes has never 
been seen before in the West, or the 
reaping oi a lair crop from an extrem- 
ely large acreage, depends entirely upon 
the weather during the next three 
weeks. All recognize that should this 
remain favorable, a good crop will be 
reaped over most sections of the coun- 
try. Present reports now show that 
some parts of southern Manitoba and 
southern Saskatchewan are suffering 
,10111 drought, northern Saskatchewan is 
reported to have too much moisture, 
while from a few parts in central Sas- 
katchewan comes the reports of damage 
done by frost. In spite of all these re- 
ports, however, a good crop can, be 
reckoned on, if the "weather man" con- 
tinues to smile. 

The above facts have been clearly 
proved in the demand that has been pre- 
vailing for binder twine. One of the 
largest wholesale houses in the city 
stated to-day that they had not enough 
twine lef t , in their house to supply the 
smallest order. Reports from other 
houses are almost as bad. Not only are 
local stocks fairly low, but it is report- 
ed by many that the supply at the nulls 
from which they receive their special 
brands are entirely used up, and conse- 
quently, they will not be able to accept 
any orders in the future. 

Owing to the holding of the annual 
exhibition during the week, shipments 
to a certain extent have been interfered 
with, as the majority of the travelers 
are at the present time in the city, and 
are busy straightening up accounts, etc., 
at their head offices. Numerous visitors, 
and customers are also in the ei r ,v ai d 
are frequently dropping in on ihe various 
houses with large orders. Apart from 
this, the regular half holiday granted by 
the city to visit the exhibition, also 
helps to interfere with business Enough 
orders are, however, on hand to keep 
the houses busy, as conditions have been 
very satisfactory during the season On 
the reports of travelers from the differ- 
ent sections of the West wholesale houses 
are preparing for an exceptionally busy 
fall, as from every point comes encour 
aging reports. All lines continue to be 
active. Sorting orders in seasonable 
lines are still being received, but not as 
numerous as heretofore. Ingot tin 
and solder are both strong and 
active and are holding very firm. 



Harvesting tools are now very 
active and are moving in large 
quantities. As the first harvesters' ex- 
cursion is expected within three weeks, 
merchants are busy laying in their sup- 
plies. Fall sporting goods are also mov- 
ing, especially guns, rides, and ammuni- 
tion. In fact it is acceded by all that 
the present outlook in the hardware 
trade in the West is more promising 
then ever before. 

Winnipeg Hardware Quotations. 

Axe Handles— Oval and octagon, s.g. 
nickory, $3.50; No. 1, $2.00 ; 3, $1.60 ; 
p.g. oak, $2.75. 

Auger Bits— "Irwin" bits, 47± ; other 
lines 70 and 10 per cent. 

Bolts — Carriage, f and smaller, 65 ; 
7-16 and larger, 55 ; machine, j and 
under, 60 and 5 ; 7-16 and over, 55 ; ma- 
chine set screws, 65 ; plough bolts, 50 ; 
square and hexagon nuts, cases, 3 ; 
small lots, 24 ; stove bolts 77£. 

Bar Iron— Bar Iron, $2.50 ; Swedish 
iron, $4.25; sleigh shoe steel, $2.65; 
spring steel, $3.40 ; machinery steel, 
$3.50 ; tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 
lbs. $8.50 ; Jessop, $15 

Blocks— Steel, 50 per cent; wood, 60 
per cent. 

Cut Nails.— $3.15 per keg base. 

Copper— Planished copper, 30c per 
lb.; tinned, 24c. 

Crowbars— 4£c per lb. 

Corrugated Iron and Roofing, etc. — 
Corrugated iron, 28 gauge, $3.87; 26 
gauge, $4.18; pressed standing seamed 
roofing, 28, painted, $2.84; 26, $3.24. 

Canada Plates.— Firm. Half polish, 6 
and 7-inch, $3.65; 8-inch, $3.90; full 
polish, 6 and 7-inch, $4.40; 8-inch, $4.65. 

devices— 7£c per lb. 

Enamelware — Canada, 50; Imperial, 
60; Premier, 50; Colonial, 60 ; white 
70 and 5 ; diamond, 50 ; granite, 60 per 
cent. 

Files— American, 75 ; Black Diamond, 
60 ; Nicholson's, 65 per cent. 

Galvanized Iron.— Apollo, 16 gauge, 
$3.80; 18, $3.85, 20, $3.90; 22 and 24 
$4; 20, $4.20; 28, $4.60; 30 gauge or 
10% oz., $4.80; Queen's Head, 20, $4; 
24, $4.20; 26, $4.60; 28, $4.80. 

Galvanized Iron Pipe.— f in., $3.50 ; £ 
in., $4; f in., $5.20; 1 in., $7.50; 1J 
in., $10.25; 1£ in., $12.45; 2 in., $16.25. 

Galvanized Ware — Pails, 40 and 5 
p.c. Other galvanized lines, 37y 2 p.c. 

Grindstones— Per 100 lbs., $1.65. 

Horseshoes— "M.R.M." and "Bell" 
iron, No. to 1, $4.90; No. 2, and 
larger, $4.65; snowshoes, No. to No. 
1, $5,15; No. 2 and larger, $4.90; steel, 
No. to 1, $5.35; No. 2 and larger, 
$5.10; featherweight, $6.50. 

Horse Nails — "M.R.M." cold process 
—No. 3, $4.30; 4, $3.80; 5, $2.75; 6 
$3.30; 7, $3.05; 8, $2.85; 9, $2.75; 10, 
11 and 12, $2.65 in 25-lb. boxes. 

46 



Harvest Tools — 50, 5 and 5 p.c. 

Hinges — Light T and strap, 65 p.c. 

Hooks — Brush, heavy, per doien, 
$8.75; grass, $1.70. 

Iron Washers — Full box, 40 p.c. ; 
smaller lots, 35 p.c. 

Iron Pipe, Black— i in., $3 ; i in., $2.- 
45 ; i in., $2.50 ; i in., $3.25 ; J in., 
$4 ; 1 in., $5.65 ; 1* in., $7.75 ; 1} in., 
$9.25 ; 2 in., $12 ; 2* in., $19.60 ; 3 in., 
$25.75 ; 3£ in., $33.50 ; 4 in., $38.35 ; 44 
in., $44.10 ; 5 in., $50.40 ; 6 in., $65.10 ; 
7 in., $95.50 ; 8 in., $118. 

Logging Chain— i in., $7.50 ; 5-16 in., 
$6 ; i in., $5.50. 

Lanterns — Cold blast, per dozen, $7; 
coppered, $9; dash, $9. 

Poultry netting — 57y 2 per cent. 
Pig Lead— $4.75. Lead Pipe— $5.25. 

Rivets and Burrs — Iron rivets, 55 per 
cent.; copper, No. 8, 30c; 10, 32c; 12, 
34c; copper burrs, No. 8, 40c ; 13, 43c; 

12, 46c; copper rivets and burrs, No. 8, 
31c ; 9, 32c ; 10, 33c ; coppered, No. 8, 
17c; 9, 17Jc; 10. 18c. 

Rope— Sisal, 8c; pure manila, 10|c ; 
British manila, 8Jc; lath yarn, 9c. 

Sheet Zinc — Casks, $8.25; broken 
lots, $8.75. 
box, $12.25; I box, $6.50; I. X. X., full 

Steel Squares — 40 off new list. 

Shovels— Discounts on No. 1, No. 2, 
60 and 2* p.c; No. 3, No. 4, 50 and 
2£ p.c; No. 1 scoops 50 and 6 p.c; all 
other grades, 45 and 5 p.c; fifty cents 
per dozen net is added to equalize east- 
ern freights. 

Solder— Half and half, $26 per cwt. 

Screws— Flat head iron, 80, 10, 10 
and 10; brass, 75; round head, iron, 
80 ; brass, 70 ; coach, 65 per cent. 

Stove Pipes— 25 and 2| p.c. 

Terne Plate— 1. C, $9.75; I. X., 
$11.75. 

Tin Plate— I. C, charcoal, 20 x 28, 
full box, $10.25; i box, $5.50; I. X., full 
box, $14.25; £ box, $7.50; 20 x 39, I. C, 
full box, $13. M); \ box, $8; I. X., full 
box, $15.50; \ box, $9. 

Tinware, Etc. — Pressed, retinned and 
plain, 75 and 2£; pieced, 25; japanned 
ware, 35. 

Wire.— Barbed wire, 100 lbs., $3.05 ; 
plain twist, $3.40 ; staples, $3 ; an- 
nealed wire, base, $3; oiled, 10c extra ; 
bright iron $3.20 base; brass spring wire, 
base, 23c; plain galvanized iron, Nos. 
6, 7 and 8, $3.50; No. 9, $2.90; 10, 
$3.60; No. 11, $3.70; No. 12, $3.10; No. 

13, $3.40; No. 14, $4.25. 

Wire Nails— $2.90 Winnipeg, and $2.45 
Fort William. 

Wringers— Royal Canadian, $3»25; 
New Easy, $42.50. 

Paints and Oils. 

Lubricating Oils and Grease. — These 
lines are also pretty active, especially 
grease. An increase is expected during 
the next two weeks in machine oil, as 
farmers will then be getting their ma- 
chines in order for the harvest. Prices 
are holding steady and it is expected 
they will be about the same as last 
year. 



Methods of Retailing Paints and Varnishes 



Change Brought Large Business Increase 

Location of Paint Department Was Changed by Montreal Firm 
to More Advantageous Position and Trade Showed Immediate 
Stimulation. 



Montreal, July 14. — That the position 
of the paint department is a factor thai 
should receive careful consideration is 
proved by a little incident that was no- 
ticed in a local hardware store recently, 
following a change in the store arrange- 
ment. 

The Jas. Walker Co., Limited, whose 
store is on St. James Street, with a rear 
entrance on Notre Dame Street, have 
been making certain alterations which 
chiefly involved the office staff. This 
store is a long one, extending, as will be 
seen, from one street through to the 
other. The paint department was about 
in the centre of the store at one side 
with the goods displayed on shelves 
against the west wall. In justice to this 
branch of the business it might be said 
that the location was not by any means 
the best in the store. 

A Change Made. 

When the office was moved to the rear 
and given a position overlooking the 
store, on a floor between the ceiling and 
floor of the store proper, the paint de- 
partment was also moved to th rear and 
under the office. It is quite a large de- 
partment with the display shelves on 
either side of the Notre Dame Street 
entrance. People passing along the lat- 
ter street could not fail to see the uni- 
form array of paint cans even at a casu- 
al glance. And those who entered or 
went out by that door had to pass 
through the paint department. It will 
thus be seen that the paint end of the 



business had been given a fairly promin- 
ent position. 

Nor was it long before an increase in 
the demand for paint was noticed. Some 
time ago it was stated, when the change 
was but a 'few days in effect, that busi- 
ness had increased fifty per cent. This 
was a rough guess, but there was a de- 
cided improvement in the trade done in 
this department. One of the clerks who 
is in charge of paint stated that busi- 
ness had increased easily twenty-five per 
cent, since the position had been chang- 
ed. 

J. E. A. Loiseau is the head clerk of 
the paint department and practically 
only one manufacturer's line is carried. 



LEAD MAKERS ON THE OIL SITU- 
ATION. 

The National Lead Co., a large United 
States firm, have published in pamphlet 
form the following observations on the 
linseed oil situation : 

There is not enough linseed oil in 
the world at the present time to go 
around. 

Two years of flaxseed shortage has 
produced a serious condition. The con- 
dition is so serious that a few plain 
words are justified and should be of 
intense interest to every painter, dealer, 
property owner and anyone else inter- 
ested in paint or painting. 

In the first place, there is an actual 
shortage. The situation is caused by 
crop failure, not by manipulation by 



1 
















Vreien\ . location 
^pt Rainr department 


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SHfLr GOODS 




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PAItlT 




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rear erifranc 


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PAINT 




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ift 


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U00P3 




Sporiing 
Goods 


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TSuilPIRfi 

Hardware 






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Plan of store of the Jas. Walker Co., Montreal, showing the change that was 
made in location of paint department. 

47 



speculators or holding back stocks by 
farmers. The high prices of linseed oil 
are therefore justified. 

Keep that fact in mind. 

In the second place, there is no sub- 
stitute for linseed oil for outside paint- 
ing. 

Keep that fact in mind also. 

The serious shortage of linseed oil 
makes the search for some -other worthy 
paint oil highly desirable and entirely 
praiseworthy. But do not let that fact 
blind you to that other fact, that, so 
far, the worthy substitute for linseed 
oil has not been found. 

The unprecedented situation has caus- 
ed to spring up many new paint vehicles 
with all kinds of extravagant claims. 
Some say "better than linseed oil." 
Others are more modest. They say "as 
good as linseed oil.'.' 

The wise painter will not be tempted 
by any of these unproved claims. Try 
them, if you wish in a small experi- 
mental way, but remember that no paint 
oil has yet made good except the old 
time-tested linseed oil. 

Dealers who care for their customers' 
welfare and their own reputations will 
be just as cautious. 

Property owners have nothing what- 
ever to gain by allowing anything but 
pure linseed oil to be used. The latter 
is high, it is true, but the painting job 
will not be much greater than usual, and 
he had better pay the difference. 

Having indicated the safe attitude to 
take toward the new claimants for at- 
tention as paint oils, let us sound a 
warning against the greater danger, 
adulterated linseed oil, masquerading as 
pure. 

To palm that off on anyone is merely 
theft. It is theft of more than the 
amount one overpays for the material. 
The total stealing is the amount re- 
presented by the damage the material 
causes. 

Painters and dealers may guard them- 
selves by dealing with only reputable 
concerns. A price below the market 
at any time, but especially at such a 
time as this, is suspicious. It should 
be a signal of danger to the buyer, like 
a suspicious pressure on your watch 
pocket, in a crowd. 

Let us summarize the safe course: 

Refuse adulterated linseed oil alto- 
gether. 

Be on the lookout for new paint oils, 
but do not trust them till you have prov- 
ed them good by adequate tests. 

Stick to pure linseed oil for serious, 
outside painting. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Interesting Features of Painters' Convention 

Exhibits Made by Paint Manufacturers— An Address by Pro- 
fessor Gardner on Oil and Turpentine Substitutes and the 
Means of Detecting Adulteration. 



The eighth annual convention of the 
Master House Painters and Decorators' 
Association of Canada was held in the 
Temple building, Toronto, on Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday of this week. 
There were some very interesting fea- 
tures of the convention, not the least 
being the exhibits made by the manufac- 
turers and wholesalers. 

A number of papers dealing with mat- 
- ters of vital import to the trade were 
read. 

Among the subjects treated were : 
"The Manufacturing and Coloring of 
Wall Paper ;" "Turpentine, Linseed Oil 
and Substitutes ;" "The Modern Paint 
Shop ;" "Brushes, Bristles and Bristle 
Substitutes." An address was delivered 
on Wednesday morning by Professor H. 
Gardner, of the Institute of Industrial 
Research, Washington, on a subject 
which had a deep interest for everyone 
connected with the manufacture, sale and 
use of paint, touching as it did, on the 
manufacture, the qualities and the de- 
tection of substitutes for linseed oil and 
turpentine. For the hardwareman who 
handles oil and turpentine practically 
every day in the year and who frequent- 
ly has to stake his reputation on the 
purity of the stock that he sells, the 
topic has a peculiar and far-reaching in- 
terest. Prof. Gardner took the subject 
up in a comprehensive way> touching on 
each of the better known substitutes 
and illustrating each step, in his address 
with stereopticon views. 

He first showed something of the 
growth and culture of flaxseed and, by 
means of the lantern slides, explained 
each step in the process of manufactur- 
ing oil. The same was done with refer- 
ence to turpentine. The matter of lin- 
seed oil substitutes was then taken up 
and each was described in turn — soya 
bean oil, sunflower oil, cotton seed oil, 
Chinese wood oil and several varieties 
of marine oils. Prof. Gardner explained 
the qualities of each. He spoke highly 
of soya bean oil when mixed with lin- 
seed and mentioned the curious fact that 
the soya bean plant enriches instead of 
depleting the soil. Sunflower oil has 
good qualities but is extremely difficult 
to obtain. He told of the peculiar and 
valuable qualities of the Chinese wood 
oil and the limitations of marine oils. 

The next step in his address had to do 
with the tests being carried on in vari- 
ous parts of the States, to prove the 
lasting qualities of various paints and 
oils, as well as combinations of paint 
oils., 

The most interesting feature of the 
lecture, from the standpoint of the re- 



tail paint and oil salesman was the me- 
thod shown of detecting adulterants in 
linseed oil and turpentine. By holding a 
I iot lie or tube of pure oil or "turps" in 
the light cast by an enclosed type arc 
light, a clear yellow light is shown. If 
there is as much as one tenth of one per 
cent, adulteration, however, the liquid 
will show partly bluish. Although it 
was not possible to use the proper kind 
of light for the purpose in the lecture 
hall, Prof. Gardner used the best light 
available and was able to show ithe 
bluish tinge caused by the presence of a 
very small percentage of adulteration in 
several of his testing bottles. 

In the Exhibit Hall. 

Some very interesting exhibits were 
shown in the rooms set aside for that 
purpose. Although the booths were ne- 
cessarily small, good use had been made 
of the space. Among the firms exhibit- 
ing were : 

Southern States Turpentine Co., in 
charge of J. T. Hamilton. 

Pearse Brush Co., in charge of Charles 
Pearse. A whisk was handed to each 
delegate. 

Boeckh Bros., in charge of J. F. 
Smyth and T. Miles. A full line of steel 
grip brushes was shown. 

Holland Varnish Co., in charge of 
Harry W. Thorp and W. A. McNaught. 

James Langmuir & Co., with Mal- 
colm Sinclair in charge. 

Sanderson Pearcy & Co., with F. W. 
S. Davis and J. E. Booth in charge. 
As souvenirs, they handed out a grain- 
ing tool, a varnish brush, a polishing 
cloth and a tie pin to each delegate and 
a brooch to each lady in attendance. 

The Benjamin Moore Co., in charge of 
John Hasselman and with C. C. Moore, 
Frank Moore, F. S. Surbeck, Geo. Chit- 
tenden and M. M. Patterson in attend- 
ance. A watch fob was handed to each 
man, a fan to each lady and cap to each 
boy in attendance. 

A. Muirhead & Co., with H. G. Haw- 
kins and J. E. Carberry in charge. A 
pencil was given to each delegate.' 

The Thedden Co., with E. J. Hofford 
in charge and Jas. Alexander, B. D. 
Blackwell, F. Ebing in attendance. F. 
E. Lyman was also present on a number 
of occasions. A black leather bound 
memorandum book was given out. 

Cooke & Boulton, represented by Geo. 
Cooke and 0. S. Boulton. 

Dougall Varnish Co., in charge of 
Messrs. Wilson and McVey. 

The Woltz Moulding Co., with B. 
Spain and Charles Jones in charge. 
48 



The International Varnish Co. occu- 
pied one half of the centre space, with 
W. H. Davey in charge. Others in at- 
tendance were H. E. Worsell and H. V. 
.Johnson. As souvenirs, they gave out 
;i pocket book, a pocket knife, a watch 
fob and a pencil to each delegate. 

The other half of the central space 
was taken by the Pinchin- Johnson Co., 
with R. B. Johnson in charge, accom- 
panied by J. B. Brown. A sterling sil- 
ver stick pin was given out as a sou- 
venir. 

The Brandram-Henderson exhibit was 
in an adjoining room. A. W. Poole was 
in charge and those in attendance were 
J. E. Penfound and H. B. Shuttleworth. 
The "Old Dutch" process of white lead 
manufacture was shown. 

Ault & Wiborg, in charge of W. G. 
Francis, with E. Howe and G. Hogg in 
attendance. 

The New Empire Wall Paper Co. had 
a good exhibit. 



BRANCH IN TORONTO. 

It is learned that the Holland Varn- 
ish Co., Montreal, are contemplating 
the establishment of a branch office in 
Toronto. Harry W. Thorp and W. A. 
McNaught were in that city for the 
painters' convention and they report the 
prospects as exceptionally good. If a 
branch is established, Mr. McNaught 
will likely take charge. 



MERGER ANNOUNCED. 

It is given out that another large 
merger has been put through. Those in- 
terested are the Perrin Plow and Stove 
Company of Smith's Falls, the Tudhope- 
Knox Company, of Orillia, makers of 
steel truck; the Tudhope-Anderson Com- 
pany, of Winnipeg, and the West Lome 
Wagon Company. The new concern will 
be known as the Tudhope Company, 
Limited, and it will be capitalized in the 
millions. The headquarters will be at 
Orillia and F. J. Oliver, who is the chief 
shareholder of the Perrin Plow and 
Stove Company, will be manager. A 
large addition will be made to the Tud- 
hope-Knox Company's plant at Orillia. 
and work has already been begun on it. 
The plow plant of the Perrin company 
will be transferred from Smith's Falls 
to Orillia, but the stove plant will re- 
main there and will be greatly enlarged. 



READS PAPER CAREFULLY. 

•'Your paper is certainly very read- 
able, indeed, and is becoming of more 
benefit to the retail man. We now care- 
fully read your paper from cover to 
cover." — W. Magladery, New Liskeard. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



3 Profit Earners 



FOR ALL 
PAINT DEALERS 



IY1 JLi I Sllllt comes in a great assortment 
of shades, outdoor and interior finishes. Just 
meets your market, and a customer can't make 
a mistake, because it's the easiest to use and 
handle. You get the benefit and the profit ^^ ijj^ 
of handling a satisfactory paint of 
high quality. Sell poor paint — ^^^ \r\. 
you get the blame. 



Elastilite 



M L FloOrglaZe is a floor finish, an 

interior finish, an outdoor finish in one, and 

self-varnishing at that. Saves the buyer trouble. 

Makes a scratchless finish of high gloss. 

Easiest to use and a great seller, well 

advertised by us. 

Line Pays 
Dealers 

Varnish 



A varnish finish that won't mar easily, that brushes well, that gives a high 
surface in amateur hands. Dealers that sell it sell absolute satisfaction in every 
way as to finish. 

Get our Dealer Proposition, samples and color cards. 
Address nearest branch to you. 

IMPERIAL VARNISH AND COLOR CO., LIMITED 



108 Princess Street, 
WINNIPEG 



6 to 24 MORSE STREET, TORONTO 



524 Beatty Street, 
VANCOUVER 





Handle the \^J Paints and Varnishes 

of a Reputable Manufacturer. 

MR. DEALER: Your immediate profit is not the most important item in the selection of various lines 
for your business. 

An ordinary paint or varnish that offers you a large margin might eventually prove to be your loss. 
It's a good honest brand with a reputation behind it and a liberal profit that means your success. 

MINERVA 

PAINTS AND VARNISHES 

have always been made for exacting people. A brand that looks well and is durable. 

MINERVA lines have been manufactured for 76 years and have stood the very hardest tests of wear and 
climatic conditions 

Large Railroad and Steamship Companies, prominent painters and decorators insist on MINERVA 
brands. Users like these know paint value — paint service. 

The Manufacturers co-operate with you in selling MINERVA Paints and Varnishes. Besides a very 
attractive proposition, consistent consumer advertising is used in the press throughout the country. 



IT WILL PAY YOU TO ENQUIRE FOR PARTICULARS. 



P1NCH1N, JOHNSON & CO. (CANADA) LIMITED 

377-387 Cattaw Avenue, TORONTO, OHT. 



Established in England 
in 1834. 




49 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PAINT AND OIL MARKETS 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal. July -'1.— There are some 
reports thai business in paints is easing 
olT a little just now. This may not be 
general, bui it is found here and there 

that although tlu' demand is still ap- 
preciable it is lighter than that which 
was noted daring dune. In one sense 
this is only to he expected, although the 
amount ol building going on throughout 
the country should keep the demand up 
fairly well. Prices of linseed oil and 
turpentine are a little easier this week. 
The latter is down one cent, while turps 
is quoted around 72e or 73c. 

Linseed Oil — In conjunction with all 
staple lines, linseed oil is showing a ten- 
dency to quietness and as one conse- 
quence prices are slowly sagging. Quo- 
tations this week are one cent a gallon 
lower than those of last week, and in 
contrast with conditions long prevailing 
there is no difficulty in securing all the 
supplies required. Prices are $1 for 
raw and $1.03 for boiled. 

Turpentine — Turpentine is displaying 
a tendency to ease off in prices and it is 
probable that lower quotations will be 
in force shortly. One of the most seri- 
ous factors weighing heavily in the bal- 
ance that guides the price of turpentine 
are the low quotations for substitutes, 
which are offered as pure spirits of tur- 
pentine, but it is said that the guarantee 
of purity is regarded with some sus- 
picion. The price quoted this week is 
72c a gal. 

Ready Mixed Paints— Building opera- 
tions in the Montreal district are being 
pushed ahead with a vigor almost with- 
out precedent in the history of eastern 
Canada. There are said to be 42 farms 
on the Island of Montreal, and of these 
39 or 40 of them are reported as being 
disposed of and are under the process 
of being cut up into building lots. On 
many of these lots buildings of all sizes 
are in course of construction and the 
local demand for prepared paints has 
received an extra impetus owing large- 
ly to these conditions. Prices are steady. 

Coach and Car Paints — Canadian rail- 
way corporations are apparently exceed- 
ingly busy building new cars and coaches 
for there is a good demand reported for 
coach and car paints, along with varn- 
ishes and japans. 

Paris Green — Each day brings a sheaf 
of telegrams for Paris green, immediate 
delivery, and in practically every case 
the orders have to be expressed at once. 
It was thought that western Ontario de- 
mand had subsided, but lately there- has 
been quite a marked enquiry. All spe- 
cial discounts have been discontinued. 
It is said that buyers face an advance 



of 2c a lb. if prevailing conditions are 
maintained. Prices are as follows: In 
barrels, about 600 lbs., 17c per lb.; 
arsenic kegs, 250 lbs., 17^4c; 50-lb. and 
100-lb. drums, 18y 4 c; 25-lb. and 100-lb. 
drums, 18%c; 1-lb. packets, 100 lbs. in 
case, 20y 4 e per lb.; 1-lb. packets, 50 lbs. 
in case, 20%c per lb.; ^-lb. packets, 
100 lbs. in case, 22y 4 c per lb.; 1-lb. tins, 
100 lbs. in case, 21 1 /2C per lb. 

Arsenate of Lead — There is a steady 
demand for arsenate of lead, although 
it is approaching the end of the season. 
Prices are unchanged : In bbls., about 
800 lbs., 9c; in half-bbls., about 400 lbs., 
914c; in 25-lb. wooden kegs, 10c; 5-lb. 
bottles, 12c; in 2-lb. bottles, 13c; in 1-lb. 
bottles, 14c. 

Putty — There is a good steady trade 
in putty, enquiry being general. Quota- 
tions are : Bulk, bbls., $2.20 ; bulk, cwts., 
$2.45; bladder, bbls., $2.70; bladder, 
cwts., $2.80; 25 's, loose, $2.25; 25 's, 
cased, $2.70 ; 12y 2 's, cased, $2.90. 

White Lead — Demand for white lead 
is maintained and a good flow of busi- 
ness is passing. Lots of one ton, $5.85; 
contracts of five tons and over, $5.70 ; 
shipments less than one ton, $6 f.o.b. 
Montreal. 



TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 20.— The slight slacken- 
ing in business noted last week is not 
in evidence now. Local jobbers unite 
in expressions of satisfaction with the 
volume of trade now being placed. It 
is pretty well distributed, although some 
lines are now coming very rapidly to 
the fore. Gasoline, for instance, is 
selling in large bulk and coal oil is in 
equal demand. 

The falling off generally noted at this 
season of the year seems to have been 
postponed, if not absolutely superseded, 
as a result the general trade activity 
noted throughout the country. 

Prices have not changed this week 
although there are indications of weak- 
ness in ooth linseed oil and turpentine. 

Linseed Oil.— The prices generally 
quoted here are $1.05 for raw and 
$1.08 for boiled. Some houses are 
quoting a few cents below that figure, 
however. One house quotes $1.01 and 
$1.04. The crushers are reported to 
have reduced their price by one cent. 
This tendency toward weakness ,is rath- 
er unexpected in view of the strength- 
ening trend of the market in the old 
country. Although not a direct factor 
in the Canadian trade, conditions in 
England are generally reflected with 
with more or , less accuracy in this 
country, and the present wide diver- 
50 



gence is, therefore, surprising. There is 
still said to be some shortage of seed 
here but the indications all point to a 
good flaxseed crop in the Northwest. 

Turpentine.— Although one quotation 
as low as 72 cents has been heard for 
turpentine, the prevailing price is still 
75 cents. There has been an unexpected 
weakness on the primary markets. For 
the last few weeks, each succeeding re- 
duction has been heralded by predictions 
that the lowest possible rung on the 
ladder has been reached. But time after 
time the predictions have been discred- 
ited by further decreases and, although 
the situation has for some weeks been 
such that lower prices have seemed 
highly improbable, the downward trend 
does not seem yet to be thoroughly 
checked. Despite the fact,, therefore, 
that everything points at present to a 
cessation of price reductions, no one 
cares to assert that such will prove to 
be the case. 

Rosin.— There are no developments in 
the rosin market. Sympathy with tur- 
pentine has effected some reductions of 
late but they have not been large 
enough to prove material. Therre is a 
fairlv brisk demand at present. 

Putty. — The demand is growing but 
the season is not yet far enough advanc- 
ed to bring about active conditions. 
Standard putty is quoted at: Bulk, in 
casks, $2.2.0; in 100-lb. drums, $2.25; in 
25-lb. drums, $2.65; bladder, in barrels, 
$2.75. Pure putty prices remain the 
same; bulk in casks, $2.M); in 100-lb. 
drums, $2.80 ; in 25-lb. drums, $2.90 ; 
bladder, in barrels, $3. 

White Lead. — There is a good demand. 
The attendance of master painters at 
the convention has caused the retail 
trade to fall off to some extent. The 
price is being steadily maintained. 

Read Lead.— The call is said to be well 
sustained, although orders are largely of 
the sorting up variety. The price quot- 
ed here is 4 J cents for 100-lb. lots. 

Varnishes and Japans. — There is an 
active tone to the market, although the 
demand in these lines has slackened off 
some. All reports indicate that the 
season has been an exceptionally good 
one so far and, therefore, the prospect 
of a quieter time ahead does not cause 
any uneasiness. Prices remain firm. 

Glass. — Considerable glass is being 
shipped to the fire area in Northern On- 
tario. Business generally in glass is 
good for this season of the year. 

Petroleum. — The demand has become 
exceptionally heavy, now that practical- 
ly all summer resorts are filled with 
visitors. The price reduction noted last 
week holds and present quotations are: — 
Sarnia prime white, ll^c; American 
water white family safety, 13c; Pratt's 
Astral, 14-i-c. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




1 Suggestion Book"— A twenty-four page booklet of fine-colored prints of haimonious coior schemes for interiors and exteriors. 

C]| The mission of paint is to beautify and protect. 

<| The mission of the "Suggestion Book" is to meet the request 
made of us by customers all over the Dominion for suggestions for 
harmonious color combinations. 

<fl This book enables agents for B.-H. "English" Paint to advise 
their customers regarding colors for home decorations and to show 
prospective customers how various color combinations would appear 
on buildings of different architectural designs. 

IJ Any enterprising merchant anywhere will have a permanent 
profitable paint department with B.-H. " English " Paint and B.-H. 
selling helps. 

f$ If there is no B.-H. " English" Paint agency in your town, write 
our nearest office. 



J 




51 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS 



These prices are for mob qualities and Sleigh shoe steel 1 90 2 16 



quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
Is to make it perfectly accurate. Retailers 
desiring to get in couch with firms selling any 
articles on which quotations are made can do 
so by writing the editor. 



METALS AND METAL PRODUCTS 



ANTIMONY. 
Oookson's or Hallett's, per lb .... 8 25 8 25 

BABBIT METAL 

Canada Met al Company— Iniperial.genutne 
50o.; Imperial Tough, 50c; White Brass, 35o. 
Metallic, 35c. ; Harris Heavy Pressure, 25c, 
Hercules, 25c ; White Bronze, 15c; Star 
Prlctlooless 10c; Allnminoid, 9o.; No. 4; 
>o. per lb. 

Arctic Metal.— XXX Genuine, 50c; Supe- 
rior, 45c; A Special. 35c; Hoo Hoo, 25c ; "A" 
»V ; "B," 18c ; "C," 15c; "D," 12c; No. 1, 
10c; No. 2 8c; No. 3, 6o. 

Magnolia Metal Co. — Magnolia, 25c 
Defender, 20c ; Mystic, 17c ; Kosmic, 15c 

BOILER PLATES AND TUBES 



Iron finish machinery steel 

(domestic) 1 95 

Iron finish steel (foreign).. 2 25 

Reeled machinery steel 2 85 

rire steel 2 00 

Sheet oast steel 15 

Toe calk steel 2 85 

Mining cast steel 071 

High tipeed 65 

Capital tool steel 50 

Cammell Laird 

Black Diamond tool steel .... 08 

Corona tool steel 06Vj 

Silver tool steel 12% 

GOLD ROLLED SHAFTING 

9-16 to 11-16 Inch 

}tol7-16 " 

17-16to3 " 

Montreal, 25 and 2. Toronto, 30. 



2 15 

2 25 
J uu 

2 35 

15 

2 90 
08 
65 

015 
08 



06 
05i 
05 



10 gauge 2 30 



BLACK SHEETS 

Montreal Toronto 
2 50 
2 55 
2 35 
2 45 
2 45 
2 45 
2 55 
2 55 
2 65 
2 80 



Machinery oast sorap.No.l 16 00 

Stove plate 12 50 

Malleable 9 00 

Miscellaneous steel 5 00 

Old rubbers 09 

LEAD. 

Montreal 
Domestic (Trail) pig, 100 lb 3 60 

Imported pig, per 100 lb 3 75 

Bar pig, per 100 It 4 15 

Sheets, 2$ lb. sq. ft., Dy roll. 4 50 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. ft 4 25 

Cut sheets 4c per lb. extra. 

Out sheets to size, }c per lb. extra. 

LEAD PIPE 

Lead Pipe and Waste, 30 p.c. 
Caulking lead, 4fo. per pouuu. 
Traps and bends, 50 per oeut. 



14 50 
13 00 
9 00 
6 >u 

084 



Toronto 
3 75 

3 75 

4 25 

5 00 
4 75 



2 30 
2 20 
2 20 
2 20 
2 20 
2 25 
2 25 
2 35 
2 40 



SOLDER. Per lb. 

Montreal Toronto 
Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 244 n 264 
Wiping "22 24 

SHEET ZINO. 

5-owt. casks 7 E0 7 50 

Partoasks 8 00 8 Ou 



Montreal. Toronto 
Plates, i to 4 Inch, per 100 lb.. 2 20 2 20 

Heads, per 100 lb 2 45 

Tank plates. 3-16 inch 2 30 

Tubes per 100 feet, 14 Inch . . 9 50 



2 

? " 

34 " 
4 

BRASS. 



8 25 
. . 10 50 
. . 12 00 
.. 15 00 
. . 19 25 



2 45 
2 40 
9 00 
8 50 
10 00 
12 10 
15 30 
19 45 



Spring sheets, up to 20 gauge 

Rods, baBe V 2 to 1 inch, round .... 

Tubing, seamless base, per lb 

Tubing, iron pipe size, 1 Inch base.. 
Oopper tubing, 4 cents extra. 

BRASS GOODS, VALVES, ETC. 



22 
21 
25 
23 



Ground work, 65 p.c. 

Standard Compression work, 65 p.c. 

High grade compression work, 60 p.c. 

Cushion work, 55 per cent. 

Fuller work, 70 p.c; No. 0, 75 p.c, and 1 and 2 

jasin cocks, 70 p.c. 
Flatway Btop and stop and waste cocks, 65 

p.c; roundway, 60 p.c. 
J.M.T. Globe, Angle and Check v'alveo, 55 

p.c; Standard, 65 p.c. 
J.M.T. Radiator Valves, 60; Standard, o5; 

patent quick-opening valves, 70 and 10 p.c. 
Kerr extra, standard, globes, ingles and 

checks, 60 p.c. 
Kerr Jenkins' disc, standard valves, 624 P-c 
Kerr copper alloy disc standard globe, angle 

and check valves, 624 p.c 
Kerr standard radiator disc valves, 65 and 10 

p.c; Jenkins disc and quick opening hot 

water radiator valves, 75 p.c. 
Kerr Weber l.B.B.M. straightway and water 

pa te valves, screwed and flanged, 624 and 

10 p.c. 
Kerr N.P. Union Elbows, 75 p.c. 
Kerr " Radium" valve discs, 45 p.c 
Jenkins' Valves — Quotations on triplication 

to tenkins' Bros.. Montrer 
COPPER 

Per 100 lb. 

Casting ingot 13 75 13 25 

Out lengths, round bars, 4 to 2 In. . 21 00 
Plain sheets, 14 oz., 14 x48", 14 160".. 23 00 
Copper sheet, tinned, 14x60, 14 oz. . 20 50 
Copper sheet, planished, 14x60, base 28 00 
Braziers', in sheets, 6x4 23 00 

COPPER AND BRASS WISE 

Brass, 60 p.c; copper, 624 P-c 

IRON AND STEEL 



CANADA PLATES 

Ordinary, 52 sheets 2 90 2 90 

All bright, 52 sheets 3 70 4 00 

Galvanized— Apollo D. Crown Ordinary 

18x24x52 4 45 4 45 4 35 

60 4 70 4 70 4 60 

20x28x80 8 90 8 90 8 70 

9 40 9 40 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS (CORRUGATED) 

22 gauge, per square 6 10 

24 " " 5 no 

26 " " 3 85 

28 " " 3 65 

Less 10 p.c. 

GALVANIZED SHEETS 

B.W. Queen's Fleur- Gordon Gorbal's 
gauge Head de-Lis Crown Best 
16-20.... 360 335 360 3 60 

22-24.... 365 340 365 365 

26 4 05 3 80 4 05 4 05 

28 4 25 4 00 4 25 4 25 

Colborne Crown— 3.65, 3.70, 3.75, 4.00. 

Less than case lots 10 cents per hd. extra. 
'Comet" sheets — 

22 3 65 

24 3 70 

26 375 

28 4 00 

Apollo brand— Montreal Toronto 



In car lots. 



Montreal. Toronto. 



Canadian foundry, No. 1 

" No. 2 

Middlesboro, No. 3 pig iron. . >s 25 
Bummerlee, No. 2 " . v. jO 

Oarron , special . v DO 

Carron, soft i 75 

Cleveland, No. 1 18 75 

Olarenoe, No. 3 18 00 

Jarrow 17 1 5 

Glengarnock 

Radnor, oharcoal iron 32 UO 

Ayresome, No. 3 18 75 

Ferro Nickel pig iron ( Soo) 25 00 

Steel billets, Bessemer or open 

hearth, f.o.b. Pittsburg 

Angles base 2 50 

Common bar, per 100 lb 190 

Forged Iron J 05 

Refined " " 1 15 

Horseshoe Iron " 116 

Wild itMl ' 95 



19 50 
19 00 
19 00 
22 50 



20 50 
20 75 
20 50 
22 50 
32 50 



27 50 
2 50 
2 05 
2 20 
2 30 
2 30 
2 15 



24 gauge, American 3 60 

26 " 3 85 

28 " (26 English)! 4 10 

10} oz. , equal to 28 English 4 35 

IRON PIPE. 
Size (per 100 ft.) Black. 



2 

24 
3 
34 

4 



: 03 
2 25 

2 63 

3 28 

4 70 

6 41 

7 70 
9 57 

16 39 
21 52 
27 08 
30 78 



inch 



3 45 
3 50 

3 95 

4 25 

Galvanized 

2 86 

, 3 08 

3 48 

4 43 

6 35 

8 66 

10 40 

13 86 

22 14 

29 07 

36 58 

... 4158 



SPELTER. 
Foreign, per 100 lb 6 25 6 25 

TIN AND TINPLATES 

, Lamb and Flag and Straits — 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $47 00 49 00 

Redipped Charcoal Plates— Tinned 
MLS, Famous (equal Bradley) Per box 

I C, 14x20 base $7 00 

IX, 14x20 base 8 25 

I X X. 14x20 base 9 50 

Raven and Murex Grades— 

IO, 14x20 base 5 00 

IX, 14x20 base 6 00 

I X X, 14x20 base 7 00 

I X X X, 14x20 base 8 00 

"Dominion Crown Best"— Double. 
Coated, Tissued. 

10, 14x20 base 7 "0 7 00 

I X, 14x20 base 8 25 8 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 9 50 9 50 « 

" Allaway's Best"— Standard Quality. 

I 0,14x20 base 4 50 

IX, 14x20 base 5 25 

I X X, 14x20 base 6 00 

Bright Cokes 
Bessemer Steel— 

IC, 14x20base 4 25 

20x28, double box 8 50 

Charcoal Plates— Terne. 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I C, 20x28, 112 sheets 7 50 

IX, TemeTin 9 00 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

XX, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.~l 
" 14x60, " y .... 7 00 

" 14x65, " J 



IRON PIPE FITTINGS. 
Canadian malleable, 40; cast iron, 65 ; 
standard bushings, 70 ; headers, 60 ; flanged 
unions, 65 ; malleable bushings, 65 ; nipples, 
75 and 10 ; malleable, lipped unions, 65. 

SOIL PIPE AND FITTINGS 

Medium and extra heavy pipe up to 6 inch, 
70 and 10; 7 and 8 in. pipe, 50 p.c 

Light pipe, 60 and 10 p.c; fittings, 70 and 
10 p.c. 

RANGE BOILERS 

30-gallon, Standard, $4.75; extra heavy, $7.00 

KITCHEN SINKS 

Cast iron, 16x24, $1 ; 18x30, $1.15; 18x36, $1.95. 
Flat rim enameled sinks, 15 x 24, $2; 18 x 30, 
$2.35: 18 x 36, $3.50. 

HEATING APPARATUS. 

Gas ranges, 50 per cent 

Stoves and Ranges— 45 to 55 per cent. 

Furnaces — 45 per cent. 

Registers— 70 to 75 per cent. 

Hot Water Boilers— 50 and 10 per cent. 

Hot Water Radiators— 50 and 10 per cent. 

Steam Radiators— 50 10 and 24 per oent- 

Wall Radiators— 50 and 10 p.c 

Specials— 25 p.c 

OLD MATERIAL 
Dealers buying prices : 

Montreal Toronto 
Heavy oopper and wire, lb. 11 11 J 

Light oopper bottoms 09 09} 

Heavy red brass 10 10* 

" yellow brass 08 084 

Lightbrass 06 064 

Tea lead 024 024 

Heavylead 02} 02} 

Sorap ziuo 003 004 

,Vd I wrought Iran 12 50 10 00 



Tinned Sheets. 
72 x 30 up to 24 gauge, case lots 7 75 7 35 
" 26 " 7 85 

WIRE 

ANNEALED OUT HAT BAILING WIRE. 
No. 10, #3,80; No. 11, $3.90; No. 12 and 13, 
$4; No. 134. $4.10; No. 14, $4.25; No. 15, $4.50; 
in lenghts 6" to 11", discount 30 per cent.; 
other lengths 20c per 100 lbs. extra ; if eye or 
loop on end add 25c per 100 lbs. to the above. 

CLOTHES LINE WIRE. 

No 7 wire solid line. No. 17, $4 90; No- 
18, $3; No. 19, $2,70; 6 wire solid line, No- 

17, $4.45; No. 18, $3 10; No 19, $2 80 Al. 
prices per 1000 ft. measure; 6 strand. No- 

18, $2.60; No. 19, $2.90 F.o.b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal, London. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Oarbon, No. 9, $2.45 In cars f.o.b. 
Montreal. 

FINE STEEL WIRE. 

Discount 25 per cent. List of extras. In 
10 0-lb. lots: No. 17, $5; No. 18, $5.50; No, 

19, $6; No. 20, $6.65; No. 21, $7; No. 22. 
$7.30; No. 23, $7.65; No. 24, $8; No. 25, 
$9; No. 26, $9.50; No. 27, 810; No. 28, $11; 
No. 29, $12; No. 30, $13; No. 31, $14; No. 
32, $15; No. 33, $16; No. 34, $17. Extra 3 net. 
Tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, $2; Nos 26-3i $4; 
Nos 30-34, $6 Coppered, 75c ; oiling, ' 10c; 
in 25-lb. bundles, 15c ; in 5 and 10-lb bundles, 
25c ; in 1-lb. hanks, 25c ; in 4-lb hanks, 38c ; 
in }-lb. hanks, 50c ; packed in casks or cases, 
15c ; bagging or papering, 10c. 

HAT WIRE IN OOILS. 

$2.35 base f.o.b., Montreal, Toronto, Ham- 
il ton and London. 



GALVANIZED WIRE 

From stock, f.o.b Montreal — 100 lbs. 
Nos. 4 and 5, $2.80; 6, 7, 8, $2.75; 9, $'.30; 
10, $2.80; 11, $2.85; 12, $2.45: 13, $2.55; 
14, $3.15. In car lots straight or mixed. 

POULTRT NETTING. 

2-ln. mesh, 19 w. g., 60 and 24 p.c oft. Otbtv 

sizes, 60 and 5 p.o. off. 
Poultry netting staples, 55 per oent. 

SMOOTH STEEL WIRE 

No. 0-9 gauge, $2.35 base; No. 10 gauge, 6c 
extra; No. 11 gauge, 12c extra; No. 12 gauge, 
20c extra; No. 13 gauge, 30c. extra; No. 14 
gauge, 40c extra ; No. 15 gauge, 55a extra ; 
No. 16 gai'ge, 70c extra. Add60c. for copper- 
ing and $2 for tinning 

Extra net per 100 lb. — OUed wire 10c, 
spring wire $1.25, blight soft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed In oasks 
or oases 15c, bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, In 25-lb. bundles 
15c, In 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, In 1-lb 
hanks, 50c. In 4-lb. hanks 75c, In 4-lb. 
hanks $1. 

WIRE CLOTH 

Painted Screen, in 100-ft. rolls, $1.65 per 
100 sq. ft.; in 50-ft. rolls, $1.70 per 100 sq. ft. 
WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 45 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 75 

Oar lots and less. 
Dominion special field fencing, 334 p.o. small 
lots; extra 5 p.c. 
F.O.B. Montreal. 

WIRE ROPE 
Galvanized, 1st grade, 6 strands, 24 wires, I, 
$5 ; 1 inch, $16.80. 
Black. 1st grade, 6 strands, 19 wires, |, $5 
inch, $15.10. Per 100 feet f.o.b. Toronto. 
WROUGHT STAPLES 

Galvanized 2 85 

Plain 260 



PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS 

B A. B.N PA-INT 

In barrels, 1-gal. tins 80 85 

In barrels, 5-gal.tins 80 85 

BEESWAX 

Perlb 040 

CHEMICALS 

In casks per lb 

Sulphate of copper (bluestone) 07 

Litharge, ground 05 

flaked 05} 

Green copperas (green vitrol) 01 

Sugarof Lead 09 

COLORS IN OIL 

Venetian red, 1-lb tins pure 09 

Chrome yellow, pure 18 

Golden ochre, pure •. . 11 

French ochre, pure 09 

Chrome green, pure 11 

French permanent green, pure 15 

Sign writers' black, pure 17 

Marine black, 25 lb irons 05 

ENAMELS 

Per gallon in quart tins. 
M. L. Floorglaze (Imperial V. & C. 

Co 180 

Cee Pee Co. enamel 4 50 

GLUE 

French medal 10 

German common sheet 10 

German prima 15 

White pigsfoot 15 20 

Brantford medal 10 

golden medal 11 

" brown sheet 10 

" golden sheet 13 

" gelatine 22 

" white gelatine 20 

" white glue 12 

" lOOflake 10 11 

Perfection amber ground, No. 1230 13 
Ground glues at same prices. 
Brantford all-round glue, }-lb. packages, 10c; 
4-lb., 15c; 1-lb., 25c. Discount. 

PARIS GREEN. 

Montreal Toronto 

Drums, 50 and 100 lbs 18} 18} 

Packets, 1-lb., 100 in case 20} 20} 

" 4-lb., " 22} 22} 

Tins, Mb., 100 in case 21} 21} 

PARIS WHITE. 

In bbls 90 

PIGMENTS. 

Orange Mineral, casks 09 

" 100-lb. kegs. 09} 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

Per gallon in qt. tins 

Sherwin-Williams paints, base . 2 00 

Canada Paint Co. 's pure 1 75 2 00 

Globe house paint (Windsor) 1 60 

" New Era" house paint (Windsor). 1 85 

Benj. Moore Co.'s "Egyptian" Brd 1 51 

Moore's pure linseed oil, H.C 1 65 

Brandram-Henderson's "English." 1 95 

Ramsay's paints, pure 1 60 

Ramsay's paints, Thistle 1 30 

Martin-senour, 100 p.c. pure 2 00 

Senour's floor paints 160 

Maple Leaf Paint (Imp. V. & O. Co) 1 90 



52 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



YOUR BEST CUSTOMERS 

demand Brushes that give absolute satisfac- 
tion that do not shed the bristles, and that 
work evenly. 

BOECKH'S 

"STEEL GRIP" BRUSHES 

are the practical painter's choice. Experience 
has guided him in selecting this line. 

The BOECKH BROS. COMPANY, Ltd. 



TORONTO 

Factories : 158 to 168 Adelaide St. West. 



Offices : 80 York St. 




This cut was 
reproduced from a 
photograph of a 
Bowser System 
installed for 

Manville 
Hardware Co., 
Prince Albert, 
' Sask. 

Ask the Bowser 
users. 




This system 

handles 

Raw Linseed 
Boiled Linseed 
Turpentine 
Gas Engine Oil 
Cylinder Oil 
Floor Oil 
Machine No. 1 
Machine No. 2 
Coal Oil 

with profit to the 

owner. 



The Way to Get More Profit on Paint Oils. 

Look at the barrels, faucets, measures, funnels and floors if you want to see where a goodly share of your oil profit goes to. You can save every cent 
of this loss by using a Bowser System. It measures the oil directly into the customer's can. No Maatures nor Funnels. 

You can buy one pump and tank or a dozen. Just suit your own needs. You can try out only one at first. The price is reasonable. They protect 
you from fire and save their cost. Ask for FREE book No. 1 N. 

S. F. BOWSER £& CO., LTD., 66-68 Fraser Ave., TORONTO 



53 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLANTER OF FARIH 



Half-pint tin», per dozen. . 



2 30 



60 



Bulk In casks . . . . 

■■ 100-lb. drums 

Bladders Inbbls .. 



Standard. 



2 55 
2 75 



KID DRT LEAD. 

Genuine, 580 lb. oasks, per owl 4 75 
(leonine, 100 lb. ken. J £5 

No. 1. casks, perlWlbe. 4 26 

No. 1. kegs, per 100 lbs 4 75 

SHINGLE STAINS. 

In 5-gallon buokets 



4 75 
525 
4 25 
4 75 



76 



Plain, In bids 

Glide™ bolted In barrel! 

HARDWARE 



Carpenters', per doz 12 60 

Plalnshlp, " 18 U0 

AXIS AND HATCHETS 

Single bit, per doz 6 00 

Double bit " 10 00 

Bench Axes 8 75 

Broad Axes 22 75 

Hunters' Axes 5 00 

'Boys' Axee 5 75 

Lathing hatcheta 4 70 



Shingle 

Olaw 

Barrell 



1 46 
1 70 
6 50 



70 

1 00 



14 00 
22 00 



9 00 
12 00 
10 00 
25 00 

600 
6 50 

10 00 
6 75 
6 00 
6 85 



f aylor-Forbes, prospectors 



Buokworth, per lb ° 



05 



ft! 



TURPENTINE AND OIL. 



AMMUNITION 



'Dominion" Rim Fire Cartridges and 



BUILDING PAPER, ETC. 

Tarred Slater's paper, per roll 70 

O. K. paper, No. 1, per roll 76 

O. K. paper, No. 2, per roll 70 

Plain Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. roll ... . 46 

Plain Fibre, No. 2, " .... 27 

Tarred Fibre, No. 1, per 400 ft. Toll. . . 56 

Tarred Fibre, No. 2, " . . 36 

Tarred Fibre Oyolone, 25 lb., per roll 55 

Dry Cyclone, 16 lbs 46 

Plain Surprise, per roll U 40 

Kesln sized Fibre, per roll 40 

Asbestos building paper, per 100 lbs.. 4 00 

Heavy straw, plain A tarred, per ton 37 60 

Oarpet Felt, per 100 lbs 2 60 

Tarred wool roofing felt, per 100 lb.. . 1 80 

Pitoh, Boston or Sydney, per 100 lbs 70 

Pitch, Sootch, per 100 lbs 66 

Heavy Fibre, 32' A 60', per 100 lbs. . . . 8 00 

2 Ply Ready Roofing, per square 70 

j • " " " .... 96 

2 Ply oomplete. per roll 1 16 

J ,r " 1 35 

Liquid Roofing Cement, brls., per gal 15 

tin* " ?" 

Crude Coal Tar, per barrel 3 50 

Refined Caal Tar, tins, per do/. 1 26 

Refined Coal Tar, per barrel 4 50 



Montreal Toronto t < b caps 50 10 & 2 p.c.;B.B caps, 6U, lOand Shingle varnish, per barrel 4 50 

Can Prime white petroleum gal.... 12 2 ,' p ' c; c „ t re Fire Pistol Cartridges 25 and Caps, per lb 0b 

•• \I. 1 . . _iu. " .-• n»„t»« w:.« s™»rtimr and Militarv Nails, per lb u "o 



D 8. Water white 
U.S. Pratt's astral 
Oaatoroll, perlb., nbbls... 
Motor Gasoline single bbla. 



08 



13J 
151 
09 
171 
J 



E%r^n«^rW,.-0 72^ 

Wood Turpentine . " . 

Turpentine, second run . . . „.^. • • -^ » Q7 



tj p c.: Centre Fire Sporting and Military 
Cartridges, lu and 10 p c ; Primers, lu and .2* 
p.c; Brass ShotShells, 45 and 121 p.c.; Shot 
Cartridges, discount sama as ball cartridges, 
f.o.b. any jobbing point east of Manitoba. 

"Crown" 8 Black Powder, 30 and 10 p.c; 



Mop cotton, per lb 15 



Plated, bower barff A nickel, No. 241, 45 p. 
Wrought brass, 45 p.c. off revised list 



Llneeed Oil 



boiled 1 03 



Rosin, "O" grade, bbl. lots, 100 lbs. 



1 10 

3 25 



Imperial" Shells, both Bulk and Crescent brands, 70 per cent 



VARNISHES. 



Oarrla«o, J*o. .»•• 

Pale durable body 

•' hard rubbing .. .. 
Ptnest elastlo gearing .... 

ElastloOak 

Furniture, polishing .... 
Furniture, extra . ..... 

•■ No. 1 — 

•• union. ... 

Light oil finish * 

Gold size Japan 

Turps brown Japan 
No. 1 brown Japan 



Per g«L oans. 

150 

8 50 

8 Ou 

8 00 

1 50 

I 00 

. .. 1 20 

95 

. ... U 90 

1 35 
00 



Baking black Japan » 

No. 1 blaok Japan « 



Benzine blaok Japan , 

Crystal Damar •••• J 

xr~ 1 ■* * 



No. 1 



Pure asphaltum } 

An/.l n .k » 



1 60 
1 10 
1 35 
95 

75 
50 
35 

1 40 
50 



10 p.c 

and 10 p.c; - 

Dense Smokeless Powder, 30 and 10 p.c. 

Empty Shells, 30 and 10 p.c. 90 days net. 

Ordinary drop 8ho6, AAA to dust «7.5U pei 
100 lbs. Discount 25 per oent ; cash discount. 
2 per cent, 30 days ; net extras as follows 
subject to cash disoount only ". Chilled, *°°A 
buck and seal, 80c; no. 28 ball, $1 20, per 100 
lbs.: bags less than 25 Iob., Jo. per lb.: F.O.B. 
Montreal, Toronto, Hamilton, London, Bt. 
John and Halifax, freight equalized. 

AUGERS AND BITS 

Ford's auger bits 2?. aod 10 

Irwin's auger 47) 

GUmour's auger WJ 

Rockford auger JS* 10 

GUmour's car. 474 

Clark's expansive 40 

Jennings' Gen. auger, net list. 



CEMENT AND FIREBRICK 
Canadian Portland, bags per bbl 1 55 1 70 

White Bros. English 100 106 

' ' Lafarge " oement In wood 3 40 

Fire brick, Scotch, per 1,000 .... 13 00 '8 00 

English 17 00 1100 

" American, low 28 00 25 00 

■■ " high 27 50 85 00 

Fire olay (Bootoh), net ton 6 50 

CHALK AND PENCILS 
Carpenters Colored, per gross 85 80 
" lead penolls, per grs 2 40 6 75 



CHISELS. 
Cold chisels, 5 x 6 in . , doz . . , 
Bevel edge, 1 ln«h, doz 



2 50 



OUoloth 

Lightning dryer 

ElastUlte varnish 

Granitlne floor finish.... ••••••••• 

Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish . 
Canada Paint Cos Bun varnish . . . 

" Kyanlze" Interior Finish 

•' Flint-Lao," ooach ' 

B.H. Cob " Gold Medal," In oases 2 50 

Flattlne floor finish J «« 

Elastioa exterior finish • *> 

Stovepipe varnish, 1 pints, per gross 8 00 
Pure white shellac vamiBh, in barrels 1 76 
Pure orange 
No, 1 orange 



WINDOW GLASS 

Size United 
Inohes. 8 t» r „ 

Under26 t* » 



86 

1 25 

2 2) 
2 60 
2 25 
2 40 



1 25 



26 to 40 
41 to 50 
51 to 60 
61 to 70 



4 65 
6 10 

5 35 

6 75 



71to80 825 

si t^ns 7 00 



81to85 * 

86to90 

91to95 

98 to 100 ."■ -••*• 

Toronto, 30 P.O. to SO and 5 p.c 



Double 
Diamond 
< 6 25 

6 75 

7 50 

8 50 

9 76 

11 00 

12 50 
15 00 
17 50 
20 60 



BARN DOOR HANGERS. 

doz. pairs 

Steams wood track 4 50 6 00 

Zenith..... ■•- l°° 

Atlas, steel covered 5 00 b uu 

Perfect UU 11 ou 

New MUo,' flexible 6 00 

Double straphangers, doz. sets — 6 SO 

Standard jointed hangers, " •••• 6 46 

Steel King hangers • • • • »« 

Storm King and safety hangers .... b ib 

Storm King rail 4 25 

Crown * jg 

Crescent « J™ 

Sovereign ' **> 

Chicago Friction, Oscillating and Big Twin 

Hangers, 5 per cent. 

Steel, track, 1 x 3-16 in. (100 ft.). . . . 3 25 



BARN DOOR LATCHES 

Challenge, dozen 1 15 

Defianoe, dozen . ...... i 75 

Gem dozen « 6° 



CHAIN 
Proof ©oil, per 100 lb., i to., $6.00; 5-16 In , 
84.85 ; I In., $4.25 ; 7-16 in., $4.00 ; Jin., $3.75 , 
, 9-16 in., $3.70 ; J in., $3.65 ; ! In., $3.60 ; 1 in., 
$3.45; 1 In., $3.40. „ , 

Stall fixtures, 35; trace chain, 45 ; jack chain, 
Iron, 50; jack chain, brass, 50; cow ties, 40; 
halter chains, 50 and 5; tie outs, 75; coil 
chain, 50 and 5 ; hammock chains, galvan- 
ized, 35 and 5. 

churns. _ . 

No.0,$9; No.l,»9; No. 1, I10J. No. 3, 



U , i.1 U. 0, 

$11 "Nazis'; No",'57»16.; f.o.b, Toronto 
Hamilton, London and St. Marys, 40 
per oent.; f.o.b. Ottawa, Kingston and 
vt< ntreal. 371 and 10 per oent. 

CLAMPS 

Malleable swivel head, 4 In 2 50 

adjustable, 4 in J 60 

Carpenters, 3 feet 3 "> 



CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

rx-h, In 1" foot lenghts 3 30 

" '• " '.'.'.'.'.'.'..'.'.. 5 28 

.• •• » 7 26 

.• • •• 8 80 



WHITE LEAD GROUND IN OIL 

Montreal 

Monro's Beleot Flake White 

Elephant Genuine .-■••• 2 ?? 

Moore's Pure White Lead.. . . 

LUyPure « "" 

Tiger Pure........ b w 

Monarch (Windsor) 

Essex Genuine (Windsor).... .... 

BrandramsB.B. Genuine.. 7 25 

" Anohor,"pure... 6 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead b "0 

Ramsay's Exterior .... j> £> 

C.P. Co. 's Decorators Pure 

Western Schedule. 



Door bells, push and turn, 45 and 10 p.o. 
Cow bells, 65 p.c. , 

„ . Sleigh bellB, shaft and hames, pair, 22c up. 
Per 100 lb sleigh bells, body straps, each, $1.15 up. 
Farm bells, No. 1, $1.65. 



6 00 



Toronto 
6 90 



6 15 
6 15 
6 50 

6 15 

7 40 
6 15 
6 15 
6 15 
6 15 



COTTER PINS 

Cotter pins, 90 p.c Msntreal 

COPPER AND NICKEL WARE. 
"topper boilers, kettles, 50 p.o. 
Copper tea and coffee pots, 45 p.o. 
Copper pltts, 30 per oent. 
Foundry goods, hollow ware, 45 p.o. 

DOOR KNOBS 

Canadian knobs, 45 and 10 per cent. 



EAVBTBOUGHB. 

8 Inoh In 100 foot lengths 2 90 

10 " " " 3 15 

11 368 

.15 5 25 

Add extra 10c per 100 ft. O.G. Round Bead 
Trough. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Milk oans and palls, 40 p.o. 
Hand delivery and creamery cans, 40 p.c 
Railroad and cream cans and taps, 45 p.o. 
Creamery trimmings, 75 and 12) p.o. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, oork-Uned, 86 per oent. 

FARRIER KNIVES 

Buokworth, 50 p.c. 

FILEB AND RASPS. 

Per cent 

Dtsston'B 7u and 10 

Great Western, American . — 70 and 10 

Kearney Jt Foot, Arcade 70 and 10 

J. Barton Smith, Eagle 70 and 10 

McClellan, Globe 70 and 10 

Black Diamond... 60 and 10 

Delta Files 60 

Nicholson 62$ 

Jowett's (English list) 27) 

FORGES 
Blacksmiths portable, 135 lbs 9 86 

GALVANIZED WARS 

Dufferin pattern pails, 50 per oent 
Flaring pattern. 50 per cent 
Galvanized washtulm, 45 per cent 

GRINDSTONES 

Over 40 lbs. and 2 in. thick, per 100 lbs. 1 10 
Smaller sizes extra. 

HAMMERS. 

Tack, iron, doz 36 

Ladies olaw, handled, doz 80 

Adze eye nail hammer, 10 oz , doz. ... 1 25 
" hickory handle, 1 lb., doz.. 6 35 

" straight claw, 1 lb., doz 7 00 

Farriers hammers, 10 oz., doz 5 60 

Tinners setting, ) lb., doz 4 50 

Machinists, )lb., doz 3 " 

Sledge, Canadian, 5 lbs. and over 06 

Sledge, Masons, 5 lbs. and over 08 

Sledge, Napping, up to 2 lbs 09 

HARVEST TOOLS. 
50 and 5 per oent. 

Sidewalk and stable sorapera, net, $2.25. 
Wood hay rakes, 40 and 10 per oent. 
Lawn rakes, net. 

HALTERS 
Jute Rope, l-lnoh .... per gross 

ii 11 a 11 11 

Leather, l-lnoh per doi. .... 

Leather, 1) " " ... 

Web 

HINGES 

Blind, disoount 50 per oent. 
Heavy T and strap, 4-ln 100 lb. net 

" " 5-ln. " .... 

" " 6-ln., " .... 

" " 8-ln., 

" " 10-ln. and larger 
Light T and strap, disoount 65 p.c 
Sorew hook and hinge- 
under 12 n.... per 1001b 

over 12 In " .... 

Orate hinges and back flaps, 66 and 
Chest hinges and hinge hasps, 65 p. 

HINGES (SPRING) 
Spring, per grosB— No. 5, $16.10; No. 10, 

$16.10; No. 20, $9.50; No. 50, $17.58; No. 

51, $7.76; No. 120, $16.10. 
Screen door sets— No. 2250, $14.95 ; No. 2260, 

$19.56; No. 2275, $21.85; No. 1192, $19.55. 
Chicago hold back screen door, iron, gro. $12. 
Chicago spring hinges, 15 p.c. 
Triplex spring hinges, 40 p.c. 
Chicago surface floor (6,000), 45 p.c. 
Garden City fire house hinges, 12) p.c 
" Chief " floor binge, 50 p.c. 

HOOKS 
Wrought Iron hooks and staples— 

. . per gross .... 2 



Extra, 60, 10 and 10 per oent. 

Standard, 60, 10, 10 and 10 per oent. „___—_. , — , 

No. 1, not wider than 6 In., 60, 10,10 and 10 Porcelain, mineral and Jet knobs, net list. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 In., 75 per oent 



Laoe leather, per side, 80c; out laoea, 85o 



BIRD OAGEP. 



Brass and Japanned, 40 p. c 



BOLTS AND NUTS 



T . m . o n c 30 days or net 3 months from Carriage Bolts, common new $1 list Percent 
datloTshipment. Packages 25 lbs. and over. •• | and smaUer... 70 

WO-lb kegs 15c per 100 lbe. lower. Deliyery- 
FO B Toronto or Hamilton ; London 5c per 
100 lbs extra. Contracts as required until 
15th May, 1911. 



DOOR SETS. 
Canadian, 45 and 10 per oent. 
Door pulls, 60 per cent. 

DOOR HANGERS (PARLOR) 

Single sets, each (Easy brand) 1 80 

Double sets, each 3 25 

Unbreakable rail, 100 feet 5 00 



WHITE EINO (DRT). 

Extra Red Seal, V.M 

WHITE ZINC IN OIL. 

Pure, in 35-lb. Irons 

no. 1. ;; 

No. 3, " 



« 07) 



08) 
07 

«5! 



j and smaller... 

" " 7-16 and up 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, | and less 60, 10 4 10 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 60 

PloughBolts 55, 5410 

Blank Bolts 60 

BoltEnds 60 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts, i and less. . . 60 and 10 
Sleigh Shoe Bolts, 7-16 & larger 55 and 05 

Ooach ScrewB. new list 7 

Nuts, square, all sizes, 4)c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4)c per lb. off. 
Stove rods, per lb., 5) to 6c. 
Stove Bolts 80. 



DOOR SPRINGS 
Chicago (coil), 25 per cent. 
Reliance (coil), 20 per cent. 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Carpenters 6 inch, doz J 25 

Folding handles, 8 Inch, doz 1 80 



DRILLS. 
Bit stook drills, 2-82 In., doi 87 

ESCUTCHEON PINS 
Steel, disoount 60 per oent 
Brass, 66 per oent. 

54 



B 00 

10 00 
12 00 
4 00 
6 30 
3 46 


7 36 
7 00 
6 75 
6 50 
835 


4 00 
350 



5 p. 0. 



1x5. 
5-16x5. 



Bright wire screw eyes, 60 p.c 
Bright steel gate hooka and staples 
Iron screw hooks, 60 and 20 p.c 
Iron gate hooks and eyes. 60 and 30 p.o. 
Orescent hat and ooat wire, 60 per oent. 
Stove pipe eyes, kitchen and square hooks 
60 p.c. 

HORSE NAILS. 

M.R.M. cold forged process, list 3rd January, 
1910, $2.80 per box base No. 9 and larger. 
Oapewell brand, quotations on application. 

HORSESHOES. 

Iron shoes, light, medium and heavy, No. 
2 and larger, $3.90; No. 1 and smaller, $4.15 ; 
snow pattern, No. 2 and larger, $4.15; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.40; "X.L" steel shoes, new 
light pattern, 1 to 6, No. 2 and larger, $4.35; 
No. 1 and smaller, $4.60; "X.L." steel shoes, 
feather weight, pattern all sizes, No. to 4, 
$5.75; special countersunk steel, all sizes, 
0-4, $6.25; toe weight steel shoes, all sizes, 
No. 1 to 4, $6.75. F.O.B. Montreal. 

Toecalks Standard, J.P. A Co., "Blunt" No. 
1 and smaller, $1.50; No. 2 and larger, $1.25. 
"Sharp" No. 1 and smaller, $1.75 ; No. 2 and 
larger, $1.50 per box. Put up in 25-lb. boxes. 

HORSE weight? . 
Taylor-Forbes, 4)c per lb. 

ICE CREAM FREEZERS 

White Mountain, 60 p.o. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A Word to the Dealer! 



Are you selling the old-fashioned " paint-me-oftenoid " roofing, 
or are you selling the modern "no-paint" kind called Amatite Roof- 
ing? We are spending thousands of dollars every month in adver- 
tising to tell the consumers that the day of painted roofings is past 
and that they can secure at the same price Amatite Roofing which 
needs no painting. <J Amatite has a practical, durable mineral sur- 
face Lay it on the roof and it needs no further care. <J Every 
practical user of ready roofings sees the point in a minute. He 
knows that painting roofs every two or three years is a nuisance 
and that it costs him money. He knows that he is liable to neglect 
it, or find when the time comes round that he cannot afford to buy the paint just then, or hasn't the time, and so the roof gets 
neglected and wears out. <| Show him that you have a "no-paint" roofing which costs no more than the old-fashioned kinds and 
you will get his order. <j Amatite is easy to lay, requiring no skilled labor. Nails and cement are supplied free, packed in the 
centre of the roll. Booklets, samples and other information on request. Address our nearest office. 

THE PATERSON MANUFACTURING COMPANY, Limited 

MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER ST. J«HN, N.B. HALIFAX, N.S 



ROOFING 




The Roofing House of Canada! 



"The House cool in Summer, and warm 
in Winter." 

That's the line of talk that never fails to 
sell our Building Papers and Roofings. 

They are guaranteed to be made of finest 
quality materials, to withstand all kinds of 
climates, and to be easily laid by any 
ordinary workman. 

We also make all kinds of Wrapping Papers. 



Alex. 
McArthur & Co., 

Limited, 

82 McGill Street, 
Montreal 

Western Agent: 
F. J. Cox, 
Winnipeg 



"^ 



RED 

s 

BRAND 

WINDOW 

GLASS 

TH£ TORONTO PLATE GLASS IMPORTING CO., Limited 

PLATE, WINDOW, FIGURED, STAINED, WIRED, BENT, MIRROR 

and ORNAMENTAL GLASS 

Works, DON SPEEDWAY TORONTO 




GLASS 

BENDERS 

TO 

THE 

TRADE 



HEINISCH TINNER SNIPS 



The 
VULCAN' 




Cut illustrates the famous "Vulcan" 
shear, specially designed for cutting curves, 
all irregular shapes, cornice work, small circles 
down to 3 inches diameter. The great care 

taken in selection of materials and the knowledge of correct tempering gained 
in our 85 years' experience making shears have contributed to make the 
"Heinisch" shear the standard of the world Sold by all jobbers. 

tailors' R.. Heinisch's Sons Company trimmers 

SHEARS Newark, N.J., U.S.A. SCISSORS 

55 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ErMVEa. 

Hay knives, net li«t. 
Olausa, 50 and 25 per oent. 

KITCHEN ENAMELED WARE 

White w»re, 75 per oent. 
London and Prlnoees, 50 per oent. 
Canada, Diamond, Premier, 50 and 10 p.c 
Pearl, Imperial, and granite steel, SO and 10 

per oent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per oent. 
Star deoorated steel and white, IS per oent. 
Hollow ware, tinned oast, 50 per oent off. 
Enamelled street signs, 40 p.o. 

EITOUEN SUNDRIES. 

Asbestos mats, 60 p a 

Oan openers, per dos 40 75 

Mlnolng knlTee perdos 50 90 

Potato mashers, wire, per dos. . . SO 70 

" wood " .. 50 80 

Vegetable slloers, per dos 1 25 

Universal meat chopper. No. 1 I 15 

Enterprise ohopper, eaoh 1 SO 

dptders and fry pans, SOand 5 p.o. 

Star Al ohopper 6 to 52 1 S5 4 10 

100 to 10S 1 »S 1 00 

Kitchen books, bright BO 

Toasters, 5U p.o 
Fire shovels, 60. 
Oil stove* and ovens. 50 and 10 

LADDERS 
S to 6 feet, 12a per foot ; 7 to 1ft., 13c. 
Extension ladders, 15c. per foot up. 

LANTERNS. 

Japauued ware, 45 per oent. 

No. i or 4 Plain Cold Blast.... per doi 8 76 

Lift Tubular and Hinge Plain, " 6 00 

Japanning, 50c. per dozen extra. 

Prism globes, per dozen, $1.20 

Lamp wick, 50 per oent. 

LAWN HOSE 
Competition grade lawn hose, 70 and 5. 

LAWN MOWERS 

Taylor Forbes Co. — 8-inch wheel, 3 knives, 
12 in, $5.10; 9-in. wheel, 3 knives, 12 in., 
86.75; 9-in. wheel, 5 knives, 12 in., $7.75, 
lOJ-in. wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., $8.50; 104-in, 
wheel, 4 knives, 12 in., ball bearing, $10.00: 
50 per cent, f.o.b. Guelph. 

D. Maxwell & Sons.— 8-incb open wheel, 
3 knives, 12 in., $5.10; do., * knives, $6.25, 
9-inch wheel, 3 knives, 12 in. sizes, $6.75; 
do., 4 knives, $7.25 ; 104-inch wheel, 4 knives, 
12 in. sizes, $4.50, ball bearing do., $10; 
do., 5 knives, $10.50. 50 percent, f.o.b. fac- 
tory. 

LOOKS AND KEYS. 

Canadian, 45 and 10 per cent. 

LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES 

Cant hooks, dozen, from 12 00 

Axes, dozen, from 6 50 

Axe handles, dozen, from 1 15 

Cross cut saws, per foot 25 43 

Axe wedges, dozen 25 

Ball and heel calks 4 00 4 25 

MALLETS, 

Tinsmiths', 24, x 54 in., per doz 1 26 

Carpenters', round hickory, 6 in., per 

doz 1 95 

Lignum Vitae, round, 5 inch, per doz 2 40 
Caulking, No. 8, oak, per doz 15 00 

MATS 

Wire door mats, standard, 16x24, doz. 9 00 

METAL POLISH. 

Tandem metal polish paste 6 00 

Axoline brass cleaner, 100 Id package 6 50 

MINERS SUPPLIES 
Mattocks, 6 lb., 18 inch, $6 dozen 
Picks, 6 to 71b., 4.65 doz. 
Pick handles, $1.85 dozen. 
Prospectors' hammers, 16 J oentsper lb 
Drilling hammers, 6 cents per lb. 
Crowbars, 3J cents per lb. 

MOPS AND IRONING BOARDS. 

Mops, per doz 120 150 

Folding ironing boards 16 25 18 00 

nails Wire 

l-ljinch 3 30 

liinch 2 95 

14— Uinch 2 70 

2— 2Jinch 2 60 

24— 2J inch 2 45 

3—3} inch 2 40 

34— 4inch 2 35 

44, 5, 5J, 6 inch (base) 2 30 

Out nails— Montreal, $2.40 ; Toronto, $2.60. 
Miscellaneous wire nails, 75 per cent. 
Coopers' nails, 334 per cent. 

Pressed spikes, { diameter, per 100 lbs. . 2 85 



PIECED WARE. 

Ulsoount 35 per oent. 

•0-ot. flaring sac buckets, 35 mir oent. 

1, 10 and 14-o.t. flaring palls 35 per oent. 

Copper bottom tea kettles and boilers, 35 p.o. 

Coal hods, 40 per oent. 

Boiler and tea kettle pitta, 35 p.o. 

PLAITED 

Wood bench, Canadian, 40, American, 25p.o. 

Wood, fanoy, SO to 35 per oent. 

Stanley planes, $1.55 to $3.60, net list prtoes 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS 
Button's genuine, 874 to 40 per oent 

PUMPS. 
Berg's wing pnmp, 7 6 per oent. 

rasoks. per doa. 

Bokers 7 50 11 0U 

" KlngOntter 15 00 

Henokels 7 60 10 00 

Olauss automatic safety 27 00 

Olauss perfect stropper 16 00 

Gillette Safety, each .... S 76 

Olauss Razors and Strops, 60 per oent 

Ever Ready Safety » 00 

ROPE AND TWINE. 

Sisal rope 084 

Pure Manilla rope 104 

"British "Manilla 08J 

Cotton, 3-16 in. h and larger 24 

Russia Deep Sea line, J in. diam. and 

over, 154 ; under 4 in., 164- 
Jute, f and upwards, 9c.; under |, 94c 

Lath yarn, single . . 08 

Lath yarn, double 

Sisel bed cord, 48 feet, per dozen 
Sisel bed cord, C feet, per dozen 
Sisel bed cord, 72 feet, per dozen 
Cotton clothes line, 274 ott. 

Bag, Russian twine, per lb 

Wrapping, cotton, 3-ply twine . . 
" 4-ply twine .. 

Mattress twine, per lb 

Staging " " 



OAKUM. 
Plumbers ....per 1001b.... 



4 50 



OILERS, 

Kemp's Tornado and MoOlary s Model 
galvanized oil oan, with pomp, 5 gal- 
lon, per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, 40 per oent 

21no and tin, 50 per oent. 

Ooppered oilers, 60 per oent. off 

Brass oilers, 60 per oent, 

Malleable, 95 per oent 

PLATED OOODS 

Hollowware, 40 per cent discoun 

Flatware, staples, 40 and 10; fancy, and 50. 

Hutton's "Cross Arrow" flatwa e, 424 per 

cent. "Singalese" and "Alaski" Nevada 

silver flatware, 42 p.c. 



65 

80 

95 

27 
26 
i 30 
45 
35 



RKFRIGKRAXOPB 



No. 8, per lb. 



33 



Atkins Hand and Crosscut, 25 per cent. 
Disston's Hand, 15 per cent. 
SimondB Hand. 15 per cent. 
Shurley & Dietrich, 40 and 35 per cent 

SAW SETS. 

Canadian discount 40 p.c 

SCREEN DOORS AND WINDOWS Doz 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. .style 7 80 

Common doors or 3 panel, grained 

only, 4-in. style 8 10 

Beaver window screens, 14x18, open 284 

inches 1 60 

Perfection window screens, 14x15, open 

224 inches 1 80 

Model window screens, 14x22, open 364 

Inohea 2 25 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 35; Champion, 50 p.c. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne — Imperial 
Standard, 35; Weigh Beams, 35; Champion 
Scales, 45. 

Fairbanks Standard, 30; Dominion, 50; 
Richelieu, 50. 

Warren new Standard, 35 ; Champion, 45 ; 
Weigh Beams, 30. 

SCYTHE SNATHS 
Canadian, 40 per cent. 

screws Per cent 

Wood F.H., bright andsteel 85 and 10 

" R.H., bright 80 and 10 

' F.H., brass 75 and 10 

" R.H., brass 70 and 10 

" F.H., bronze.... 70 and 10 

" R.H., bronze 65 and 10 

Drive screws 85 and 10 



Snt, oase hardened 60 

Square oap 60 and 06 

Hexagon oap 45 

Bench, wood, per doz $6 00 

Iron, per doz 4 25 

screws (machine) 

Plat head, Iron and brass, 35 per cent. 
Fillliter head, Iron, 30; brass, 26 per oent, 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's, per dozen 65 1 00 

North Bros., No. 30, per dozen .... 16 80 

SCISSORS AND SHEARS 

Olauss, nlokel scissors and shears, 60 ; Japar 

65 ; tailors, 40 ; pruning, 70. 
Seymour's, 60 and 10 per oent 

SHELF BRACKETS 
No 140 65 and 10 p.o. 

SKATES AND HOOKEY STICKS. 

Starr skates, 374 per cent. 
Boker, hockey 30c. upwards : spring, 
Empire hookey sticks, $3 00, $3.50. 
Micmac and Rex stloks, $4.00. $6.01' 
Pucks net, $1.50. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES 

Canadian, No. 1 and 2 grade, 60 and 24 p.c; 
No. S and 4 grade, 50 and 24 p.o. 



Sanderson-Harold, 40 per cent. 
Galvanized, 45 p.o. 

RIVETS AND BURRS, 
iron Rivets, blaok and tinned, 60, 10 and 10. 
Iron Burrs, 60 and 10 and 10 p.c. 
Uopper Rivets, usual proportion burrs, 35 and 

124 per cent. 
Copper Burrs only, 224 p.o. ' 
Extras on Coppered Rivets 4-lb. package! 

lo. per lb.; 4-lb. packages 2o. lb. 
Tinned Rivets, net extra, 3c. per lb. 
Ooppered Rivets, net extra, 24c. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, 55 to 874 per oent. 
RULES. 

Boxwood, No. 68, 2 foot, doz 1 15 

vory, No. 1282, 2 foot, eaoh 3 50 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 
" No. 50, nlokle-plated, " 85 

" handles, Japaned, per gross 8 40 

Gammon, plain 4 25 

" plated 6 50 

Asbestos, per set 150 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

Sand and emery paper, 40 per oent 

8ABH WEIGHTS 

Sectional, 1 lb. each, per 100 lb 2 25 

Sectional, % lb. each, per 100 lbs 2 40 

Solid, 3 to 30 lbs 155 



trunk nails, black, 6b and 10; trunx nails, tin- 
ned and blued, 65 and 10; clout nails, blued 
and tinned, 65 and 10; chair nails, 35 and 10; 
patent brads, 40 and 10; line finishing, 40 and 
10; lining tacks, in papers, net; lining tacks, 
in bulk, 15 ; lining tacks, solid heads, in bulk, 
75; saddle nails, in papers, 10; sadtLe nails, 
in bulk, 15; tufting buttons, 22 line in dozens 
only, 60; zino glaziers' points, 5; double 
pointed tacks, papers, 90 and 10; double 
pointed tacks, bulk, 55; clinch point shoe 
rivets, 45 and 10; cheese box tacks, 874; 
trunk tacks, 80 and 20; strawberry box tack*. 
80 and 10. 



TAPE LINES. 

Universal, ass skin, No. 714, 66 ft., doz. S Ou 

Luf kins, linen, No. 404, 66 ft. , eaoh 94 

" steel, No. 264, 68 ft., each 3 to 

Oheaterman' p linen, No. 1822, 66 ft. ea. 1 It 

" Metallic No. 1821 1 95 

" Steel, No. 1840. 50 feet ... 4 JO 



TROWELS 

Disston's, 10 per cent. 

THERMOMKTKRP 

Tin case ani dairy, 75 to 75 and 10 p.o 



TINNERS SNIPS 

Discount 35 per cent. 



Disston's 60 and 10 p.o. 

Stanley Try Squares, size 74, doz. net. . $2 85 

aw a PS. 

Harness, 25 per cent. 

SOLDERING IRONS 

Base, per lb., 28 cents. 

STAMPED WARE 

Plain, 75 and 124 per cent. 
Returned, 75 and 124 per cent. 

SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

Eureka tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

STAPLES 

Poultry netting, 100 lbs 5 70 

Bed, 100 lbs., No. 14 6 75 

Blind, per lb 12 

Coopers' staples, 45 per cent. 
Bright spear point, 75 per oent. 



STABLE FITTINGS. 
Dennis Wire * Iron Oo», 334 p.o. 

STOVE BOARDS 
Lithographed, 60 and 10 



STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 Inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 62 

7 Inoh " " ... 8 18 

Nestable, 40 per cent. 



STOVEPIPE ELBOWS 

5 and 6-inoh, common per doa 1 22 

7-inoh " 1 35 

Polished, 15o per dozen extra. 
Thimbles, 70 p.o. 



STOCKS AND DIES. 

No. 20 Beaver Die Stock 18 75 

STONES— OIL AND SCYTHE. 

Washita per lb. 25 37 

Hindostan " 06 10 

slip " 18 20 

Axe " .... 10 

Deer Creek " 10 

Deerlick " .... 25 

" Axe " .... 15 

Lily white " 42 

Arkansas " .... 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued, 80 and 10 p.c; tinned, 
85 ; (in kegs), 40 ; cut tacks, blued, in dozens 
only, 80 and 10; \ weights, 60; Swedes cut 
tacks, blued and tinned, bulk, 85 and 5, in 
dozens, 75 and 10; Swedes, upholsterers', 
bulk, 90; brush, blued and tinned, bulk, 70 
and 10 ; Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and jap- 
anned, 824; zinc tacks, 35; leather carpet 
tacks, 35 ; copr> - *acks, 45 ; copper nails, 50; 



TINNERS TRIMMINGS 

Discount, 45 per cent. 

Plain and retinned, 75 and 124 

TRAPS (STEEL GAME) 

Newhouse, 30 per cent. 

Hawley & Norton, 40, 10 and 5 per cent, 

Victor, 60 and 5 per cent. 

Oneida Jump (Star), 50, 10 and 5 per cent 

TRAPS (RAT AND MOUSE) l>o> 

Out O' Sight Mouse Traps M 

B Rat Traps 1 20 

Easy Set Mouse 46 

" " Rat 95 

Blizzard Mouse Traps 45 

Rat Traps 96 

Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Mouse Traps 25 
Hold-Fast (formerly Devil) Rat Traps 80 
5-Hole Tin Chokers 80 

VISES 

Per pound 12 12} 

Hinged pipe vise, 25 lbs 3 55 

Saw vise 4 50 5 00 

Blacksmiths', 60; parallel, 45 per cent. 



WASHING MACHINES 

New Ontario 41 26 

Round, re-acting, per doz 81 25 

Square, re-acting, per doz 77 50 

Dowswell 52 50 

New Century, Style A 101 25 

Ideal Power 180 00 

Daisy 73 25 

Stephenson 74 00 

Puritan Motor 165 00 

Connor, improved 52 50 

Ottawa 55 00 

Connor Ball Bearing 112 50 

Connor Gearless Motor Washer 180 00 

20 per cent. 

WRINGERS 

Royal Canadian, 11 in., doz 47 75 

Eze, 10 in., per doz 46 75 

Bicycle, 11 inch 60 50 

Trojan, 12 inch 100 00 

Challenge, 3 year, 11 inch 53 25 

Ottawa, 3 year, 11 inch. 58 25 

Favorite, 5 year, 11 inch 61 75 

20 per cent. 

WHEELBARROWS 

Navvy, steel wheel, dozen 21 20 

Garden, steel wheel, dozen 32 40 

WHIJ-FLETREES 

Tubular steel whiffletrees, 28 in 70 

" " " 34 in 1 00 

" " " 36 in 1 25 

" " neckyokes, 36 in 1 05 

" " doubletrees, 40 in 95 

" " lumbermens, 44 In... 1 15 



WOOD HANDLES 

Second growth ash fork, hoe, rake and shove 

handles, 40 p.c. 
Extra ash fork, hoe, r ake and shovel handles, 

45 per cent. 
Nos. 1 and 2 ash fork hoe, rake and shovel 

handles, 50 p.c. 
Carriage neckyokes and whiffletrees, ash 35, 

hickory 40 p.c. 
Team neckyokes, oval avd round whiffletrees, 

hickory and ash, 35 p.c. 
All other ash goodB, 40 p.c. 
All hickory, maple and oak goods 35 p.c. 



WRENCHES 
Agricultural, 674 P-o. 

WROUGHT IRON WASHERS 

Canadian, 50 per cent. 



56 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ramsay's 

Creosote 

Stain. 




You should know something 
about these beautiful Shingle 
Stains. They are great for 
preserving shingles and are be- 
coming more popular every 
day. 

Formerly everybody was oblig- 
ed to import all these goods. 
Now, we make them. 

Ramsay's 

Shingle 

Stains 

are unequalled by any import- 
ed goods, and there is no duty 
to pay. 

You can get full price for them 
and make a good profit. They 
are put up in imperial measure 
cans and barrels. 

Write for our card and prices 
and see what we can do for 
you. 

A. RAMSAY & SON CO. 

Established 1842 

The Paint Makers 
MONTREAL 



INGOT COPPER 

Prime Lake 

Electrolytic 

Casting 

It pays to get a price from 
THE METALS HOUSE 

A. C. LESLIE 6& CO., Limited 

MONTREAL 



Facts About Paint 



The real facts about paint are known to but few — these may 
interest you :■ — 

Different climates affect paint — a paint made to resist the damp 
atmosphere of the Eastern Provinces may not prove equal to a 
paint manufactured to resist the dry atmospheric conditions of 
the Central Provinces. A paint which proves successful in a 
moderate climate is not so suitable for the tremendous climatic 
extremes of the Prairies. 

To obtain the best results you must use a paint suited to the 
climate where it is used. We have been manufacturing a 
paint especially to meet the climate conditions of the West for 
the past thirty years, and our success is evidenced by the 
tremendous growth of our business. 

Hundreds of Dealers sell GXteMertf Pure Ready Mixed 
Paints to their and their customers' entire satisfaction — because 
— they are good goods, they are guaranteed to give satisfaction 
and they give satisfaction. 

We also guarantee prompt, courteous service — "Let us give you 
details." 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO. 

Limited 

WINNIPEG - - - CANADA 

Branch at Calgary, Alta. 



57 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS 

Occasionally advertisements are Inserted In th« paper after the index has been printed. The insertion of the Adver- 
tiser's name in this index is not part of the advortlsinf order. The index is inserted solely for the con- 

vanience of the readers of the paper. 



Ami Splash Kilter Co 7i 

Armstrong Bros. Tool Oo 73 

Atkins4Co., E. O <8 

Atlas Mfg. Oo « 

Auto Controller Co., The 12 

Ajrlmer Pump »nd Scale Co 74 

A. Y. DinasSi ira Brio* 4 Lime Co.... 72 

Barber Asphalt Paving Oo 9 

Burnett, (). & H. Co. . . .ouUide back cover 

Barton Netting Co 79 

Bemi. * Call Hardware and To ICo... 70 

Herry llrm . Ltd 66 

Bigsby & Sons, W. T 2b 

Hisact.J. A 72 

Boeckh Bros "3 

Bosse4 Banks .•■•■ 72 

Booth-Coulter Copper & Brass Co 27 

Bowser, S. F., & Co., Ltd *3 

Brandrarn-Henderson, Ltd 51 

Brown Boggs Co., Ltd 28 

Buffalo Mfg. Co 78 

Burrow Stewart & Milne Co. Ltd 22 



Cameron 4 Campbell 73 

Canada Cement Co inside back cover 

Canada Foundry Co '0 

Canada Glue Co H 

Canada Metal Co 80 

Canada Paint Co 5J 

Canada Steel Goods Co 8 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co 70 

Canadian Copper Co 68 

Canadian Ferrosteel Co 2 ) 

Canadian Gas Users Assurance 72 

Canadian Hart Wheels 72 

Canadian Hea ing and Ventilating Co 21 

Canadian National Carbon Co 29 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co 73 

Canadian Supply Co 74 

Carbon Oil Works 67 

Caverhill, Learmont & Co 5 

Cheney 4 Son. S 72 

Chicago Spring Butt Co. 

Collins Mfg. Co 73 

Connor, J. H., & Son 79 

Copp. W. J., Sons4 Co 17 

Corbin, P. * F 

Cowan &. Bntton 17 

Cummer Dowswell, Ltd 2 



Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 8 

Delta File Oo 26 

Directory of Manufacturers 72 

Disston, Henry, 4 Son 9 

Dorken Bros outside front cover,69 

Dougall Varnish Co 65 



Eric Ironworks Co.... 
Estate of U. D. Oowan. 



Ford Auger Bit Co 68 

Krothingnani 4 Workman, Ltd 4 

Gait Art Metal Co 16 

Gendron Mfg. Co. Ltd 17 

Gibb, Alexander 72 

Goodell-Pratt Co 27 

Goodhue & Co., Ltd., J. L 14 

Greener, W. W 13 

Greening, B., Wire Oo 24 

Griswold Mfg. Oo 11 

Grove Chemical Co 71 

Gutta Peroha 4 Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co 26 

Hamilton Cotton Oo 67 

Harrington 4 Richardson Arms Oo . . . . 20 

Harris, J. W., Co , 79 

Heinisch. R., Sons Co 55 

Hilborn 4 Co., Ltd 73 

Howland, H.S., Sons & Co 7 

Hutton. Jas.. 4 Co 70 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 49 

International Varnish Co 66 



James & Reid 

Jardine, A. B , & Co. 



Laidlaw Bale Tie Co 12 

Leslie, A. C, * Co 57 

Lewis Bros., Ltd 3 

Lindsay, Chas 73 

London Foundry Co 78 

London Rolling Mill Co 23 

Lufkin Rule Co inside back cover 

Luther Grinder Co outside back cover 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 



McClary Mfg. Co 

McDougaU. R Co 74 

McFarlane i» Douglas 71 

McGlashan-Clarke Co., Ltd 74 

McKinnnn Chain Oo 75 

Magnolia Metal Oo IS 

Manitoba Gypsum Co Tl 

Martin, L. Co 66 

Martin-Senour Co 63 

Maxwell, D., 4 Sons 74 

Meahins 4 Sons. 64 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 64 71 

Metallic Roofing Co 25 

Michaelmas Fair 67 

Mitchell 4 Co. . David 72 

Modern Machinery Oo .... '8 

Moore, Benjamin, 4 Co 03 

Morris 4 Bailey Steel Co 75 

Myers 4 Bro., F. E 68 



National Acme Mfg. Co. . , 
National Hardware Oo. . . . 

Newman, W., 4 Sons 

Nicholson File Co 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish. 



McArthur, Alex., 4 Co. 



55 



21 

76 

72 

It 

70 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 73 

Oakey, John, 4 Sons 67 

Oneida Community.. 10 

Ontario Lantern 4 Lamp Co., Ltd 75 

Otterville Mfg. Co 70 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 25 

Parmenter Bullock Co., The 73 

Pease Foundry Co 23 

Peterborough Look Co. . . inside back cover 

Pinchin-Johnson 4 Co. , Ltd 49 

Pink, Thos 77 

Pratt 4 Lambert 66 

Queen City Oil Co 14 23 

Ramsay, A., 4 Son Co 57 

Rem.ArmsUnion Metallic Cartridge Co 30 

Remington Typewriter Co 32 

Richards- Wilcox Mfg. Co 29 

Robertson Mfg. Oo. , Ltd., P. L 71 

Rogers Son 4 Co., Hy 40 

Ross Rifle Co 80 



Sadler 4 Ha worth 15 

Samuel, M . 4 L. , Benjamin, 4 Oo 76 

Saskatchewan Glass 4 Supply Oo 20 

Schuchardt 4 Schutte 17 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 68 

Sharratt 4 Newth 73 

Shaw, A., 4 Son 73 

Sheet Metal Products Co 2 

Sherwin-Williams Co 61 

>■ hurly-Dietrich Oo. Ltd 69 

Simonds Canada Saw Co 78 

Southern States Turpentine Oo 59 

Spear 4 Jaokson, Ltd 16 

Standard Chain Co 79 

Staodard Mf*. Co 12 

Standard Paint and Varnish Co 67 

Stanley Rule and Level Co 12 

Star Expansion Bolt Co 14 

Pteel Oo of Ganada, Ltd 6 

Steele Ltd., Jas 73 

Stephens G. F 57 

Stevens-Hepner Co 65 

Stewart Mfg. Co., Jas., Ltd 18 

StiU, J. H., Mfg. Co 24 

Stratford Mfg. Co 24 

Tallman Brass and Metal Oo 71 

Tarbox Bros 81 

Taylor-Forbes Co outside front cover 

Thompson, B. 4 8. H. . .outside back cover 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Co 55 

Toronto Silver Plate Co 27 

Trewhella Bros 73 

United Roofing 4 Mfg. Co 55 

Valor Co., Ltd., The 1 



Want Ads 61 

Watson Mfg. Co., John 73 

Western Clock Mfg. Co. .inside front cover 

Western Distributors, Ltd 72 

WeBtern Wire and Nail Co 73 

Wheeler 4 Bain 24 

White Mop Wringer Co 67 

Whitman 4 Barnes Mfg. Co 77 

Whitlock 4 Marlatt 72 

Winnipeg Paint and Glass Oo., Ltd. ... 59 

Woodstock Wagon & Mfg. Co 68 

Wright. E. T, s On 61 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS 



Aluminum Ware 

Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie Pa. 
Northern Aluminum Co., Toronto 

A uger Bits 

Ford Aueer Bit Co.. Holyoke, Maos. 

Ammunition 

Dominion Cartridge Co., Montreal 
Remi gton Arms Union Metallic Cart- 
ridge Co , New York 

Anchors, Star Screw 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Babbitt Metal 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto 
"rothinebam 4 Workman. Ltd., Montreal 
Magnolia Metal On. Montreal. 
Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co , Hamilton 

Bar Iron 

Henry Rogers, Sons 4 Co., Montreal 

Bar Urns. 

Buffalo Mfg. Co., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Bath Room Fittings. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo.. Buffalo, N.Y. 

Belting 

Dominion Belting Co., Ltd., Hamilton 
.1. L. Goodhue 4 Co., Danville, Que. 
Sadler 4 Howorth, Montreal 

heltinu Hose, etc 

Out a Percba and Rubber Mfg. Co., 
Toronto. 

Rinder Twine 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth. 
Mass. 

Bird Cages 

E. T. Wright 4 Co., Hamilton 

Roilers and Radiators 

Pease Foundry Co., Toronto 
Taylor-Fo'b.. On., rtuelph. Ont. 

Ptltf and Nuts 

London Bolt and Hinge Works, London 

Ontario 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd. , Hamilton 

Bolts- Expansion 

Star Enpansio Bolt Co. New Yoik 

Brass, Sheets, Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co., Hamilton 



Rrass Goods. 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Jas. Cartland 4 Son, Ltd., Birmingham, 

Eng. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co.. Toronto 
•"avIo.-Fn'^o' Co Ltd. Onelob. Ont 
Tallman Brass 4 Metal Co., Hamilton 

Bridie kings — Galvanized, 

Rrass »nd Plain 

Star Expansion Bolt Co., New York 

Brushes 

Boeckh Bros. Co., Ltd , Toronto 
Stevens-Hepner I u.. Port Elgin 

Burners. 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Co., Hamil- 
ton, Ont. 
Ruilders' ^ools and Supplies. 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Oo., Hamilton 
Oaverhill. Learmont 4 Oo. . Montreal 
FrothlngbamA Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Howland, H. 8 Sons 4 Oo., Tnmmo. 
Lewis Brri. 4 Co. Montreal 
Lufkin Rule Co. Saginaw. Mloh. 
Newman 4 Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Stanley Rnle 4 Level Co., »«» Britain 
Tawlov-Fnvhwi Oo., Onelnh. O 

Calipers 

J. T. Slocomb Co., Providence, R.I. 

American Can Co. M ntreal, Que 
Tho*. D&vionon Mffr Co.. Montreal. 
McClary Mfg. Co., Toronto 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Carrier . Cath and Parcel 

Hamilton Brass Mfg. Co., Hamilton 

Carpet Sleepers 

Bissell Carpet Sweeper Company, Grand 
Rapids, Mich 

Carriage Springs and Axles. 

Guelph Spring and Axle Co., Guelpb 

Cartridges. 

v>nmln|nn Cartridge Co., Montreal. 
Union Metallic Cartridge Co., New York, 
U.S.A. 

Cash Registers 

National Cash Register Co., Toronto 

Cattle and Trace Chains 

Greening. P . Wire Co.. Hamilton. 
McEinnon Ohain Co.. St. Catharines 
Oneida Community Limited. Niagara 
Falls, Ont. 



Cement 

Canada Cement Co., Montreal, P.Q. 
B. 4 S. H. Thompson 4 Co., Montreal 

Chafing Dishes. 

■""ffalo Mfg. Oo. Bntfaio 

Chaplets 

S. Cheney 4 Son, Manlius, N.Y. 
Churns. 

Connor. J. H.. k Sons. Ottawa, Ont 
Cummer- ^owswell Ltd , Hamilton, Ont 
Maxwell, David, 4 Sons, St. Mary'*, Ont 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

A merfoan Shearer Mfg. Ob.,N**hua.N.H 
Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago 

Clocks 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co., La Salle, 
111. 

Clothes Reel" »■"<* J. inf. 

Cummer Dowswell, Ltd., Hamilton 
Hamilton Cotton Co.. Hammer. 

Clothes Wringers 

Cummer-DowsweU Ltd., Hamilton, Ont. 
American Wringer Co., New York Oity 

Cold Rolled Strip Steel 

The Morris 4 Railey Steel Co., Pttto- 
burg. P» 

Copper. Sheets. Tubes and Rods 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 
Toronto 

Cordagt. 

Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton 
Plymouth Cordage Co., N. Plymouth, 
Mass. 

Corrugated Iron 

The Gait Art Metal Co., Gait, Ont 

Cow Ties 

Greening. B., Wire Oo., Hamilton 
MoKinnon Dash and Metal Oo., St 

Catharines 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls, 

Cuspidors. 

Buffalo Mfg. Oo., Buffalo, N.Y. 
Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal 

WnC1»ry'» Tnnflw Ont 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright 4 uo.. HamliluL, 

Cutlery — ftaMc.fi Srmmirr n. 

OavArblll. Learmont* Oo Montreal 
Oronkes. Jonathan, 4 Son 
Dorken Bro« 4 Co.. Monrreal. 



Frothlngham 4 Workman, Ltd., Montrea 
Heinisch «, R, Sons Co., Newark. N.J. 
Howland, H S. Sons 4 Oo.. Toronto. 
Hutton, Jas., 4 0o., Montreal 
MoGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara 
Falls 

Door Hangers 

Hunt, Helm Ferris 4 Co., Harvard, 111 
F. E. Myers 4 Bro. . Ashland, Ohio 
Richards Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora 111 

Drills— Rnck and Stone 

Star Expansion Bolt Co.. New York 

Drills— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 

Dry Batteries 

Oanadi n Carbon Co., Toronto 
Canadian National Carbon Co., Toronto 

Egg B aters 

Geo. G. Veness Mfg. Co., Boston, Mass 
Emery or Corundum Wheels 
Canadian Hart Wheels Limited. Hamil- 
ton. Ont. 

Electrical Su plies 

Canadian General Electric Co. , Toronto 

ecu u. •'> "c», 
The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd.. Windsor, 

Ont 
Moriinuu James- Mtg. Co., Torouio. 

Enameled Ware 

Davidson Thos Mfg. On.. Mr.,.. — «■ 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

McClary* IdHIIIUI 1 »ol 

Ernest Stevens, Ltd., Cradley Heath 
England 
Engine .supplies, etc. 
Penberthy Injector Oo , Windsor, Ont. 

Bavetroughs 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo.. Montreal 

McC'ary'". 'ondnn Ont. 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd. , Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg 
Wheeler 4 Bain, Toronto 
E r Wrigni a. Do.. Hamilton 

Hscutcbeon fins 
The Parmenter 4 Bulloch Oo., Qana- 
noque, Ont. 

Fencing— Woven Wire. 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

f-ilesauu n^.-^/» 
R»rnet- Oo G 4 P . Pr,Uad«lob<«. Pa. 
Delta File Works, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Uisston, Henry, a nons, Philadelphia, Pa. 
Nicholson File do. Por' Hone 
Simonds Canada Saw Co., Ltd., Montreal 



58 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

"Elephant" 

WHITE LEAD 

MAINTAINS 

ITS 

ASCENDENCY 

BY 

ACTUAL MERIT 



A Valuable Trade Mark 




The " ELEPHANT " Trade 
Mark is a very valuable one. 
Perhaps the most precious in 
the whole of the Paint Industry. 
The "ELEPHANT" White 
Lead Keg is small, but overflow- 
ing with good paint. Like mile- 
stones, you will find the 
"ELEPHANT" Lead all the 
way from Newfoundland to 
British Columbia. 

THE 

CANADA 

PAINT 

COMPANY 

LIMITED 



to ftfln© 

nnDimajpxBg flnndonsftiriiail 



If so, we cordially invite you and your friends to 
make their headquarters while in the city at our 
offices, 140 Portage Ave. East; and when at the 
Exhibition our Inhibit in the Manufacturers' Build- 
ing where everything has been studied for your con- 
venience. 



THE 



EVERYTHING FOR A BUILDING 



LTD 



Calgary 



Edmonton 



Winnipeg 



Pure Gum Spirits of Turpentine 

Second Run Turpentine 

Japanese Raw or Boiled Oil 



SOUTHERN STATES TURPENTINE CO. 

Montreal Office and Warehouse— De L'Epee Ave. and C.P.R. Tracks. 

Toronto Office -101 Victoria St. Warehouse — Brock Ave. 

Main Office— Cleveland, Ohio 

P.S. Correspondence solicited. Prices, as well as 
samples, sent on approval. If it is Price, Quality 
and Service you look to when placing your orders, 
you should be looking to us to fill them. 



59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Fire Extinguishers 

The Valor Oo. Ltd., Birmingham, Eng. 

Fire Irons 

Charles l.indnay. Olwgow, Scotland 

Firearms uuu liuuntuuuuu 

Harrington ft Richardson Bona Oo., Wor- 
cester, Mass. 

Fire Escapes. 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Ueuuis Wire * Iron uo., i/ouuou 

Fire Place Furnishings 

The Bai ton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor, 

Ont 
Charles Ijndsay, Glasgow, Scotland 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co.. Philadelphia 
Oriswold Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa 

Foot Warmers 

Chicago Flexible Shaft Co., Chicago 
Ontario Lantern 4 Lamp Co., Hamilton 

For gin gs 

Steal Oo. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Furnaces, see Stores 
Galvanizing 

Canada Metal Oo.. Toronto. 
U.S. Steel Products Export Co., Mont- 
real 
Thoa Davldaon Mfg. Oo Montr**. 
The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Galvamzeo Iron 

W. Gilbertson ft Co., Ltd. Alex. Gibb, 

Montreal, Agent 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal. 

Gas Fixtures 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Glass 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Glass Ornamental 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

Toronto Plate Glass Importing Do 

Toronto. 
Winnipeg Paint 4 Glass Co. , Winnipeg 

Glass Wired 

Hobbs Mfg. Co., London 

W innipeg Paint & Glass Co. Winnipeg 

Glaziers' Diamonds 

Pelton, Godfrey 8. 

Sharratt ft Newth. Tendon, F"». 

Winnipeg Paint & Glass Co , Winnipeg 

Glue. 

The Canada Glue Co., Ltd., Brantford, 
Grove Chemical Co., Appley Kridge "ne. 

Go-Carts, etc. 

Gendron Mfg. Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Grindstones 

Richards- Wilccx Mfg. Co., Aurora, 111. 

Guns 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co. 
Worchester, Mass. 

Hammocks 

The I. E. Palmer Co., Middletown, Con. 

Handles 

St. Mary's Wood Specialty Co., St. 

Mary's, Ont 
Still. J H.. MfK. Or , St. 1 nomas 

Hardware Specialties 

Hunt, Helm Ferris ft Co., Harvard, 111 
Taylor-ForbeeCo., Ltd.. OuelpL. uni 

Hay Unloadine Tools 

F.'E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 

Hinges 

Canada Steel Goods Co. , Hamilton. 
Cowan & Britton, Ganonoque 
The Stanley Works, New Britain, Conn 
Taylor-Forbes Oo., Ltd., Gnelph. Oit 

Hockey Sticks 

Still, J. H. Mfg. Co., St. Thomas. 

Hooks 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Hoop Iron. 

Frothingham * Workman. Ltd. Mnnta 1 
The Steel Co of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Horseshoes an<> a>. 
Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd. , Hamilton 

Ice Cream Freezers 

North Bro» Mfg Co.. Philadelphia 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd , Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Ice Cutting Tools 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, i». 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Morrison, Jos., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Fanberthy TnWfcorOo Windsor. Onr 

Iron and Steel Bars 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

/ on Pine 

Steel r o. of Canada, Ltd., Hamilton 

Iron Pumps 

Aylwer Pump 4 Scale Oo.. Aylmer 
M"T>o..i,»|l P , On . r>«|l "'•' 



Ladders, Shell 

Hamilton Umax Mfg. Co., Hamilton 

Lampblack 

The L Martin Co , New York 

WttakM .Martin Wilckes Co., New York 

Lamps 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Lanterns 

Thos. Davidson Mfg. Oo., Montreal 

Ontario Lantern and Lamp Oo., Hamil- 
ton, Onr 

Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

The Sheet Metal Products Oo. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

Wright, K. 1'., ft uo., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, D. , 4 Sons, St. Mary's, Ont. 
Jas Smart Mfg Oo, BrookvlUe. Ont 
Tawlo, Pn«h«« On. <>»»■' h 

Lawn Swings 

F. E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 

Lighting Fixtures 

Jaa. Morrison BraBB Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Locks, A./io0s, nscutcneoiia. • . < 

Belleville Hdw. and Lock Mfg. Company 

Belleville. 
National Hardware Oo, Orillia 
Peterborough Lock Mfg. Oo., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 

Lamb-ring Tools. 

Pink, Thos., ft Co., Pembroke. Ont. 

Manufacturers 7 Agents. 

Mcintosh, H. F., k Oo., Toronto. 
fMbh.Alevander Montreal. 
Western Distributors Ltd., Saskatoon 
Whitlock & Marlatt, Moose Jaw 

Mantels and Grates 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor, 
Ont 

Metais. 

Booth-Coulter Copper and Brass Co., 

Toronto 
Oanada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Oaverhill, Learmont k Co., Montreal 
Frothingham k Workman, Ltd., Montreal 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Leslie A. C. , k Co., Montreal. 
Lvaagbt, John, Bristol. Eng. 
Magnolia Metal Co., Montreal 
Nova Scotia Steel and Goal Oo., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
rlamnnl. Renlaminft Co., Toronto 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd. , Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Tal'man Brass & Metal Co., H-milton 
Thompson, B. 4 S. H. 4 Co., Montreal 

Metal Shingles, Sidings, Etc- 

Gait Art Metal Co., Gait 

Metallic Roofing Co.. Toronto 

Metal Shingle and Siding Oo., Preston 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Oakey. John, k Rons. London, Fob 

Metal Store Fronts 

Canada Foundry Co. Ltd. , Toronto 

Mop Sticks 

Tarbox Bros.. Toronto 

Mop Wringers. 

White Mop Wringer Oo.,Fultonville.N.Y. 

Nail Pullers 

The Bridpgeport Hdw Corp., Bridgeport, 
Conn. 

Naih Wire 

Pannenter ft Bulloch Co., n«"anno,ue 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
United States Steel Products 
Oo.. Montreal 

Oilers 

ThoB Davidson Mfg. Oo.. Montreal 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd. .Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
Wriirht. E.T., 4 Co.. Hamilton, Ont. 

Oil Stones. 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Hamilton, Ont 

Oil Stores 

McClary Mfg. Co., London 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 

Oil Tanks 

Bowser. 8. F.. ft Oo.. Torono 

Ornamental Iron and Wire. 

Canadian Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Dennis Wire ft Iron Oo. London. Ont. 
Paints. Oils, Varnishes 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
W. T. Bigsby ft Sons, London, Eng 
Braodraui Henderson, Montreal 
Oanada Point Co.. Montreal 
Dougall Varnish Co. Montreal 
Glidden Varnish Co., Toronto 
Imperial Varnish and Color Oo., Toronto 
International Varnish Co., Toronto, Ont 
Martin -Sen our Co.. Montreal 
Moore. Benjamin, ft Co. Toronto 
Pratt ft Lambert Inc., Bridgeburg, Can. 
A. Ramsay ft Son Co., Montreal 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varniah Work» 
Windsor. Ont. 

G. F. Stephens 4 Co., Winnipeg. Mao 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Paint and Varnish Remover 

Chadeloid Chemical Co , New York 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal 
Imperial Varnish 4 Color Co.. Toronto 



Paint Bru hes. Automatic 

Standard Automatic Mfg. Co., New 
York 

Perforated Sheet Metals 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co., Hamilton 
Greening. U., Wire Oo., Hamilton. 

Pig Iron 

Steel Co of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Pipe, Wrought Lead and 
Galvanized 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Plow Points 

Star Mfg. Co., Carpentersville, 111. 
Poultry Netting. 
Greening, B., Wire Oo., Hamilton, Onr. 
John Lysaght, Ltd., Bristol, Newport 
and Montreal 

Pumps 

Canada Foundry Co., Ltd., Toronto 

R. McDougall Co., Gait, Ont 

F. E. Myers & Bro., Ashland, Ohio 

Putty 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

R.R. Angle Bars 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

R.R. Axles 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 
Razors. 

Gillette Safety Razor Oo. . Montreal 
International Distributing Co., Montreal 

Razor H^nes 

Canadian Hart Wheels, Ltd., Hamilton 

Refrigerators 

Barnet Mfg. Co. Led., Renfrew, Ont. 
Metal Stamping Co., Jackson, Mich. 

Registers 

Canadian FerrosteelCo. , Bridgeburg, Can 

Rivets 

Steel Co. of Oanada, Hamilton 
Parmenter ft Bulloch Oo., Gananoque 
P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton 
West, Ont. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Barber Asphait Co, Philadelphia 
Brantford Roofing Co., Brantford, Ont. 
Canadian Supply Co., Toronto 
Dominion Rooting Co., Ltd., Toronto 
Gait Art Metal Oo., Gait, Ont. 
McArtbor. Alex., A Oo., Montreal. 
Metal Shingle ft Siding Oo., Preston, Ont, 
Metalllo Roofing Oo.. Toronto. 
United Roofing ft Mfg. Oo., Philadel- 
phia. Pa 
Winnipeg Paint ft Glass Co., Winnipeg 

Rope 

Independent Cordage Co., Toronto 

Rules and Gauges 

Jas. Ohesterman ft Oo., Ltd., Sheffield, 
England 

Saws. 

Atkins, E. 0., ft Oo., Indianapolis, Ind 
Disston, Henry, ft Sons, Philadelphia 
Shurley Dietrich Co., Ltd., Gait, Ont 
H»monds Mfg Oo.. Fitchhur Mass 
Spear ft Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield, Eng 

Scales 

American Cutlery Co. , Chicago 
Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, Ont. 
Burr' w, Stewart ft Milne Oo, Hamilton 
PVntbingham ft Workman M- 'real 
Sherbrooke Scale Co., Sherbrooke.Que 
Screws. Nvts. frolts 
Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Scythe Stones 

The Carborundum Co., Niagara Falls, 
New York 

Shears, Scissors. 

R. Heiniah's Sons Co., Newark, N.J 
J. Wiss ft Sons Co., Newark N.J. 

Shovels and Spades. 

Frothingham ft Workman, Montreal. 
Lundy Shovel ft Tool Co., Ltd., Peter- 
borough 

Silverware. 

MoGlashan. Clarke Oo.. Niagara Falls. 
Meriden Britannia Co., Hamilton, Ont 
Oneida Community, Ltd., Niagara Falls 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Ltd., Toronto 

Spikes, Railway, Ship or 
Pressed 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Sprayers 

Cavers Bros. , Gait, Ont 

T. Collins Mfg. Co., Toronto 

Thos Davidson Mfg. Co., Montrf • 1 

The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 

Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 
E. T. Wright ft Co., Hamilton 

Spring Hinges, etc. 

Chicago Spring Butt Co., Oh oago. 111. 
Taylor-Forbes Oo., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Staples 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Steel— High Speed 

Alexander Gibb, Montreal 



Steel— Cold Rolled Strip. 

Morris ft Bailey SteelO >., Pittsburg, P 

Steel Rails. 

Nova Scotia Steel ft Onal Oo.. New Glas- 
gow. N H. 
U.S. Steel Products Co., Montreal 

Stencils 

MoOlary's, London, Ont. 
The Sheet Metal Products Co. of Canada 
Ltd., Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg 

E. T WrUM « Oo.. Hamilton, oil 

Store Ladders 

F. E. Myers ft Bro., Ashland, Ohio 

Stoves, hurvaces 
Burrow, Stewart ft Milne Oo, Hamilton 
Clare Bros., Preston. 
W J Oopp, Son ft Oo, Fort WUliain, Ont 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal 
The Down Draft Furnace Co. Gait, Ont. 
Finlay Bros. 4 Co., Carleton Place 
Gurney-Foundry Co , Toronto. 
McClary's, London, Ont. 
Pease Foundry Oo., Toronto. 
Percival Plow 4 Stove Co., Merrickville, 

Ontario 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto 
Jas Smart Mfg Co, Ltd. Brockville, Ont 
Jas. Stewart Mfg., Co., Woodstock 

Tacks 

The Steel Co. of Canada, Ltd , Hamilton 
U.S, Steel Products Co., Montreal 

Tapes 

Jaa. Ohesterman ft Oo., Sheffield Eng. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Windsor, Ont 

Tie Plates 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Tiling— Wall and Floor 

The Barton-Netting Co., Ltd., Windsor. 
Ont 

Timber Jacks 

Trewhella Bros., Birmingham, Eng 

Tin Plate. 

A. 0. Leslie ft Oo., Montreal 

Tools 

The Chapin Stevens Co., Pine Meadow 

Conn. 
The Goodell-Pratt Oo., Greenfield. Mass 
Spear ft Jackson, Ltd., Sheffield Eng 

Tool Grinders 

LutherGrinderMfg. Co., Milwaukee, Wis 

Trucks. 

Aylmer Pump ft Scale Co., Aylmer, Ont 
Oeo D Pearson ft Co., Montreal 
John Watson Mfg. Co. , Ayr, Ont. 

Vacuum Cleaners 

Onward Mfg. Co., Berlin 

Valves 

Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 

Varnishes See Paints 

Berry Bros., Limited, Walkerville, Ont. 
The Glidden Varnish Co.. Toronto 
Dougall Varnish Co., Montreal 

Ventilators. 

Harris, J. W., Co., Montreal. 
Geo D. Pearson ft Oo., Montreal 

Vises 

Hollands Mfg. Co., Erie Pa. 
Chas Parker Co., Meriden, Conn. 

Waffle Irons 

Griswold Mfg. Co., Erie, Pa 

Taylor Forbes Co., Ltd., Guelph, Ont. 

Wall Plaster 

Manitoba Gypsum Co , Winnipeg 

Washing Machines, etc. 

J H. Connor ft Son., Ottawa, Ont. 
Cummer- Dowswell Ltd Hamilton, Ont. 
D. Maxwell ft Son. St. Mary's, Ont 

Wagons — Children's. 

Wondstnok Wagon Oo., Woodstock 

Washers 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wheelharro ws 

Meaford Wheelbarrow Co., Meaford, 

White Lead 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Oaverhill, Learmont ft Oo.. Montreal. 
Frnt.hloi»h»m * Workman, Ltd M^«t.„« P l 
Howland, H. S., Sons ft Ob., Toronto, 
v owls Ri">» ft Oo Mf-»ro«l 

Wire — Iron, Steel, Brass and 
Copper. 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wve Mats 

Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 
Watford, Ont. 

B. Greening Wire Co.. Hamil'on 

Wire Goods, Bright 

Steel Co. of Canada, Limited, Hamilton 

Wire Goods 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co.. Hamilton 
0. H. Johnson ft Sons, Ltd. , Montreal 

Wire Machinery 

Ed. Brand, 472 Moss Lane E., Manches- 
ter. Kng. 

Wire Springs 

Jas. Stc le Limited, Guelph. Ont 

Woodenware 

Wm. Cane, Sons ft Co., Newmarket, One 

Wrenches 

Cochran Pipe Wrench Co. 



60 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Ltloorlac_j 

' rOHT OAK I LJ 










r 7t " i \ i 

SmtmiWimuu 
VMNISMS 




IjtAH MOT | 


-i 




r^i^r 




Jf/UMM 



1 'NSIDE FLOOR PAINT 



5 



'_ r, JC! COLOR " [W 



CARPETED floors are no longer popular. People are becoming converted to the 
greater attractiveness of painted, stained and varnished floors, which are far more 
sanitary. To get in line with this movement by making a special drive on floor 
finishes means increased sales and more profit Your paint department should contain 
a complete line of 





xn n n n /~~\ 

FLOOR FINISHES 

which includes a finish for every kind of floor. Though not the cheapest, they are 
reasonable in price, are attractively labelled and have all acquired a large sale on merit 
and good advertising. They are the kind you like to recommend to your best customers. 



S-W Inside Floor Paint 



dries with a gloss over 
night, wears splendidly 
and looks well anywhere. Made in 10 serviceable shades. 
A good reputation, attractive packages, good store dis- 
plays, color cards and literature make it a profitable part 
of your stock. 

S-W Porch Floor Paint IJZ^TZ^l 

most satisfactory and durable finish for porch floors and 
steps and decks of boats. It will withstand the hardest 
wear and scrubbing for the longest time. Made in 8 
shades and put up in quarts, half gallons and gallons. 

C B UU ETInnrlar * s a combination stain and varnish 

%9 WW riUUI lab tli £». t wears well and accurately re- 
sembles the various woods it is made to represent. An 
ideal finish for soft wood floors. Does not scratch or 
turn white and retains its color until entirely worn away. 
Is also adaptable for use on furniture and inside wood- 
work. 8 colors including clear and ground. 



An elas- 
tic com- 



S-W Crack and Seam Filler (Paste) 

position that does not shrink or dry up but gives a per- 
manently smooth, hard surface over which to apply paint 
stain or varnish. Easy to apply and always gives sat- 
isfaction. Put up in 1, 2, and 5 pound cans. 

^5»W Mamnt ls ;l c ^ ear > elastic floor varnish that 
makes good on every reasonable claim 
ever made for a high-grade product. It will not scratch, 
powder, turn white or blister under wear or water. It will 
stand the hardest abuse and can be sold without hesitancy 
to the most particular buyers. Many dealers are special- 
izing on Marnot because of its excellent qualities. 

Both transparent paste for ordi- 
nary polished floors and pow- 
dered for dancing floors. Every paint dealer should carry 
a supply of S-W Floor Wax as its good qualities make 
many repeat sales. Dancing Floor Wax is put up in 
sprinkler top cans. 



S-W Floor Wax. 



The Sherwin-Williams Proposition offers splendid opportunities to dealers everywhere. 
You cannot make good connections too soon. 

The Sherwin-Williams Co. 

(OF CANADA, LIMITED) 

PAINT, VARNISH AND COLOR MAKERS, LINSEED OIL CRUSHERS 

factories: Montreal, Toronto. Winnipeg. London, eng. 

offices and warehouses : montreal, 

toronto, winnipeg, vancouver. london, eng. 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Condensed or "Want" Advertisements 



Those who with to sell or buy businesses or 
stocks, otitnlii competent help, connect with 
satisfactory positions or secure aid In start- 
ing new enterprises, should not fall to use 
the Want Ad. Advertisement Page of HARD- 
WARE AND METAL. It Is the central mar- 
ket place of the hardware trade throughout 



Canada. There Is always someone some- 
where looking for Just such proposition as 
you have to offer. 

RATES— 2c per word first insertion. 

lc per word subsequent Insertion. 

Be additional each insertion when Box 
Number Is required. 



BUSINESS CHANCES 



POR SALE — Hardware, heating and plumbing busl- 
*■ ness In live town. Stock small. Owner wants 
to go West. Box 515, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto. (24tf) 



FOR SALE — Fins new, clean, up-to-date stock of 
hardware, stoves, granite and tinware in an ex- 
cellent farming country. Good live town of 4,000. 
Stock about $5,000 Last year's turnover nearly 
$18,000. Owner interested in the West. Box 1086, 
HARDWARE AND METAL. Toronto. (7tf) 



pOR SALE — Old established hardware and coal 
* business. Or, one of present proprietors would 
take partner with some capital. Box 204, Iro- 
quois, Ontario. (27) 

FOR SALE — Plumbing and tinsmithing business 
with first-class set of tools in good live New 
Ontario town. Good stand, iust the place for 
the right man. Box 239, Haileybury, Ont. (31) 

FOR SALE— Hardware business in Western town 
of great opportunities. Amount Invested, $30,- 
000; payment required, $10,000, which amount 
could be made annuallv. Apply Box 576, HARD- 
WARE AND METAL, Toronto. (29tf) 

FOR SALE- Plumbing, heating and tinsmithing 
business; well established in New Ontario town 
of 6,000 ; waterworks, sewers and electric light ; 
a coming city : chance of a lifetime; immediate pos- 
session; good reason for selling. Write for particu- 
lars to Box 577, HARDWARE AND METAL, Toronto 

(31) 

FOR SALE — Hardware, stove and granite business. 
Established thirty years, doing a splendid busi- 
ness, stock will run about seven thousand and in 
fine shape. Yearly turnover twenty thousand ; good 
store, can be rented or bought; fine farming country. 
This business will stand closest inspection. At rate 
on the dollar. Wish to retire. D. FERGUSON, 
Teeswater. (16tf) 



WANTED— Five to six thousand dollar hardware 
business in first-class Ontario town in ex- 
change for first-class quarter wheat land In 
Saskatchewan. Box 522, HARDWARE AND METAL, 
Toronto. (28) 



SHEET METAL PATTERN DRAWING 



BY the ordinary method of learning by experience 
only it takes a tinsmith from 5 to 10 years to 
learn how to draw patterns for everything In 
sheet metal work, discover the easiest and quickest 
ways of doing things and learn how to estimate on 
work. The lack of this knowledge costs him many 
hundreds and even thousands of dollars in lost wages 
or profits. Ask any old tinsmith If this Is not so. 
They did not have your chance of getting a cheap 
practical course in Pattern Drawing, Construction 
and Estimating. Our course gives you this know- 
ledge and, studied in connection with your everyday 
work, it learns you more In six months than the old 
method would learn you In a lifetime. For the month 
of July only we offer this complete Course for $'0 
cash. Send for full particulars. This offer closes 
Aug. 1st. AddressTHE SHEET METAL SCHOOL, 
Box 419, Gait, Ont. (30) 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ACCURATE COST KEEPING IS EASY if you 
have a Dey Cost Keeper. It automatically records 
actual time spent on each operation down to the 
decimal fraction of an hour. Several operations of 
lobs oan be recorded on one card. For small firms we 
recommend this as an excellent combination— em- 
ployees' time register and cost keeper. Whether you 
employ a few or hundreds of hands, we can supply you 
with a machine suited to your requirements. Write 
for catalog. International Time Recording Company 
of Canada, Ltd. Office and factory, 29 Alice Street, 
Toronto. 



MISCELLANEOUS 



ADDING TYPEWRITERS write, add or subtract 
1 In one operation. Elliott Fisher. Limited. Room 
314. Stair Rulldlng. Toronto. 

BUSINESS GETTING Typewritten Letters and 
Real Printing can be quickly and easily turned 
out by tbe Multigraph in your own office- 
actual typewriting for latter-forms— real printing for 
stationery and advertising, saving 25 % to 75 % of 
average annual printing cost. American Multigraph 
Salea Company, Ltd., 129 Bay Street, Toronto. 

COPELAND-CHATTERSON SYSTEMS - Short, 

simple. Adapted to all classes of business. 

Copeland-Chatterson Co., Ltd., Toronto snd 
Ottsws. ( tf ) 

COUNTER CHECK BOOKS.-Wrlte us to-day for 
samples. We are manufacturers of the famous 
Surety Non-Smut Duplicating and Triplicating 
Counter Check Books, and Single Carbon Pads In all 
varieties. Dominion Register Co., Ltd., Toronto. 

COUNTER Check Books— Especially made for the 
hardware trade. Not made by a trust. Send us 
samples of what you are using-, we'll send you right 
prices. Our holder with patent carbon attachment has 
no equal on the market. Supplies for Binders and 
Monthly Account Systems. Business Systems, Llm- 
ted. Maaufacturlng Stationers, Toronto. (tf) 

DOUBLE YOUR FLOOR SPACE -By installing 
an Otls-Fensom handpower elevator you can use 
upper floor as stock room or extra selling space snd 
Increase space on ground floor. Costs only $70. Write 
catalogue "B," Otls-Fensom Elevator Co., Traders 
Bank Building, Toronto. 

EGRY BUSINESS SYSTEMS are devised to suit 
every department of every business. They are 
labor and time savers. Produce results up to the 
requirements of merchants and manufacturers. In- 
quire from our nearest office. Egry Register Co., 
Dayton, Ohio; 123 Bay St., Toronto; 258J* Portage 
Ave. .Winnipeg; 308 Richards St., Vancouver, (tf) 

piRE INSURANCE. INSURE IN THE HART- 
* FORD. Agencies everywhere in Canada. 

HUNDREDS OF TYPEWRITERS of every make 
and condition are being traded in as part 
payment on the famous Monarch. Price and 
quality are the levers we use to prevent over stock. 
We believe we can give the best bargains in rebuilt 
typewriters in Canada. A postal will bring our 
catalogue and full information. The Monarch Type- 
writer Co., Liaited, 46 Adelaide Street West, 
Toronto. 

MODERN FIREPROOF CONSTRUCTION. Our 
system of reinforced concrste work— as success- 
fully used in any of Canada's largest buildings- 
gives better results at lower cost. "A strong state- 
ment," you will say. Write us and let us prove our 
claims. That's fair. Leach Conorete Co., Limited, 
100 King St. West, Toronto. 

MOORE'S NON-LEAKABLE FOUNTAIN PENS. 
If you have Fountain Pen troubles of your own, 
tbe best remedy is to go to your stitioner and 
purchase from him a Moore's Non-Leakable Fountain 
Pen. This Is the one pen that gives universal satis- 
faction and It costs no more than you pay for one not 
as good. Price, $2.50 and upwards. W. J. GAGE 
& CO., Limited, Toronto, sole agents r or Canada. 

PENS— The very best pens made are those manu- 
factured by William Mitchell Pens, Limited, 
London, England. W. J. Gage & Co., Limited, 
Toronto, are sole agents for Canada. Ask your sta- 
tioner for a 25c assorted box of Mitchell's Pens and 
find the pen to suit you. 

THE "KALAMAZOO" LOOSE LEAF BINDER 
holds iust ss manysheets as you actually require 
and no more. Back Is flexible, writing surface flat, 
alignment perfect. Cannot get out of order. No 
exposed metal parts or complicated mechanism. 
Write for booklet. Warwick Bros. & Rutter, Ltd., 
King and Spadina, Toronto (tf) 

AREHOUSE AND FACTORY HEATING SYS- 
TEMS. Taylor-Forbes Company, Limited. 
Supplied by tbe trade throughout Canada, (tf) 



w 



„„- MERCHANTS use National Cash Reg- 

7Zs«UU(J inters. We couldn't sell them unless 
thsy saved people monev. The National 
wltl guard your money too. Write us for proof. 
National Cash Register Co., 285 Yongs St., Toronto 

62 



SITUATIONS VACANT 



HARDWARE CLERK. Highest wages to man of 
e c X S e ^T nC . e - " nd jr c "«t>ilitjr. T. E. HENDER- 
3HUT, Mount Forest. (28) 



WANTED-Hardware clerk, must have experience, 
itate salary expected. Apply to John Dufty, 
Broadview, Sask. (30) 



WANTED-Hardware clerk, experienced, good 
stock keeper Give references and state wages 
Apply to W.J. HEARD, Fenelon Falls, Ont ' 

(29) 



GOOD position for experienced hardwarcman who 
could write advertisements and get up attractive 
circulars and booklets. State fully experience, age 
and salary expected. Will keep strictly confidential. 
Box H, Montreal Que. ( t f) 



JUNIOR HARDWARE CLERK WANTED by Sep 
f tember 1st ; bright young man with two or three 
years retail hardware experience. Must be well 
t> eC ^ m = mended " Job permanent if you suit. PURVIS 
BnOS., Ltd., Sudbury, Ontario. (31) 



TINSMITH WANTED for Saskatchewan City. 
Must be capable to handle general work and 
install Sunshine Furnaces. Wages to competent 
party 42%c. per hour, ten hours per day. Apply im 
mediately In writing, McCLARY MFG. CO., Win- 
nipeg. (30) 



TT7ANTED— Man capable of doing plumbing and 
" tinsmithing. Will pay $25 per week for good 
capable man. Write, giving full particulars, to 
H. W. STOREY, Camrose, Alta. (30) 



WANTED — A reliable, ambitious man in every 
town to look after the entire circulation of 
our thirteen publications. Work very remun- 
erative. MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, 
143-149 University Avenue, Toronto, Ont. (tf) 



SITUATIONS VACANT 

WANTED -Salesmen to handle 
A-l side line, paying liberal 
commission ; also paying A-l salary 
as soon as you have shown your 
ability. Wanted only A-l represen- 
tatives to answer this advertise- 
ment. Box 517, HARDWARE AND 
METAL, Toronto (24tf) 



HARDWARE SALESMAN 

with Al connection in Great Britain, going- 
there for six months, wishes to handle Can- 
adian Hardware. 

Address Commission 
c/o HARDWARE & METAL, 
(29) Montreal. 



TRY A CONDENSED AD. 
IN THIS PAPER. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Opening Mfedge 



To New Business 

Is the best goods at a reasonable price. 

New business is absolutely essential to 
any paint dealer, his business cannot stand 
still for any length of time — it must go for 
ward or go backward. That is a law of nature 
which works out in everything, great or small 

You want new business, Mr. Dealer, but you 
can't get it without an entering wedge. You will 
find the entering wedge to new business is 





To Re-Order Business 

Is the same force that brings in new 

business — quality which gives universal 

satisfaction. The re-order must be filled 

with the same quality that brought the 

original order, otherwise there will be no more 

business from that customer. 

You will find, Mr. Dealer, that our quality is 

just as strong a force for re-order business as it is 

for new business. The opening wedge to re-orders is 



MARTI IN-SEWOUR PAINT 

I O 0% PURE 

Honesty in manufacture and advertising is the material in this wedge. Its point is sharp and every blow you strike, the 
more business it opens to you. 

As a live 20th Century business man you naturally are anxious to get the goods that will bring in the most business. 

Mr. Dealer, you can get them by writing for our agency proposition. It is open to all live dealers, the kind that want to go forward. 



THE MARTIN -SENOUR CO., Limited 



Montreal 



Pioneers of Pure Paint 



Chicago 




MOORE'S 




is full of attractive selling points, and can be handled 
with profit by every hardwareman. "TILE-LIKE" 
is a colored Varnish and Stain Combined, and requires 
no stirring. No other varnish stain is so uniform 
in color as "TILE-LIKE," which has the added 
advantage of not hiding the grain of the wood. 
Will not mar when used on floors, works easily, is 
slow in setting, and can be rubbed in 24 hours. Suitable for all kinds of interior 
woodwork. Buying "TILE-LIKE" means saving the cost of staining, and it will be 
found a high-grade varnish, the equal of any on the market. 

GIVE "TILE-LIKE" THE PROMINENCE IT DESERVES. 
Other MOORE Leaders are: Mooramel, Muresco, Floor Paint, Saniflat. House Colors, Impervo Varnish. 

Write for Colour Cards and Prices. 

Benjamin Moore & Co., Limited, Toronto 



NEW YORK 



CHICAGO 



63 



CLEVELAND 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



MEAftlNS* 

SANITARY WASHBOARDS 

Have the qualities which recommend them to particular 
buyers. 

These washboards are of metal construc- 
tion throughout and have no wood to warp 
and no nails to come loose or rough edges 
of zinc to cut hands. They cannot retain 
dirt because each board is made in one 
piece. 

Send for Particulars and Prices to 

Meakins & Sons, Hamilton, Ont. 




The Public Knows 

THE public knows what 
itwantsandasksforthe 
merchandise it knows. It 
knows Pratt & Lambert 
Varnishes better than any 
others. It has been made to 
know, so that P. & L. Deal- 
ers might sell more and 
make more profit. 

Are you getting yours? 



Be a P. & L. Dealer 
There's money in it. 



PRATT & LAMBERT-lnc. 

VARNISH NIAKER8 62 YEARS 

24 COURTWRIGHT STREET, BRIDGEBURG, OAN. 

FACTORIES : 

BRIDGEBURG, CANADA 

LONDON PARIS HAMBURG NEW YORK BUFFALO CHICAGO 



Hark! Mr. Dealer! 



Here's your chance for a brisk, profitable trade. Such 
truile comes easily to the dealer handling 

Acorn Corrugated 

Galvanized 

Sheets 

which are made of metal so gal- 
vanized that it readily passes the 
severe tests that British Govern- 
ment requires of such building 
materials. These Sheets are high- 
est quality, yet cost no more than 
ordinary, uncertain kinds. And 
you can DEPEND on Acorn Cor- 
rugated Sheets, for they are 

A CCURATELY MADE 

Our powerful machines stamp each corrugation separ- 
ately and make them absolutely accurate. Therefore, they 
fit together perfectly and are easily erected. For moder- 
ate-priced constructions, repairing old buildings, etc., they 
are unequalled in value. Build a reputation by selling 
Acorn Quality Sheets. Thus you get a grip on the trade 
you want. Large stocks always ready for shipment. Get 
full particulars. 




METAL SHINGLE & SIDING C? LTD. 

-) PRESTON £ MONTREAL C 



(54 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




BRUSHES 



NEW LINES 



Very attractive values. 
Better finished than ever. 

SEE THEM BEFORE YOU BUY. 

Manufactured by 

Stevens-Hepner Co., Limited 

PORT ELGIN - - ONTARIO 



Why Buy the "Near Brand" when 
the Best is Procurable? 

THE L. MARTIN CO.'S 

Old Standard, Eagle, Pyramid and Clobe 

GERMANTOWN 

LAMPBLACK 

IS THC BEST 

AND HAS BEEN FOR OVER SIXTY YEARS 

Sold by all dealers who realize that a satisfied customer is 
worth more than a little extra profit on a less reliable article. 

. The L. MARTIN CO. 

■\|) Manufacturers of the 

jm Highest Standard Lampblacks 
yT for all purposes 

^^ ASK YOUR DEALER 

Quality is remembered long after price is forgotten 

NEW YORK PHILADELPHIA CINCINNATI LONDON, ENG. 



ARE YOU PREPARED 



To fill the order of a customer who asks for some really good varnish ? 
When a man says : " I want some varnish ; a brand that is tried and 
tested; something that will stand the wear," have you any DOUGALL 
VARNISH to offer him ? 

DOUGALL VARNISH fills the bill in this case and in every case where 
quality is desired. 

We make a varnish for every purpose. Each one has proved itself to be 
the best in its class. 

Dougall Varnishes are quality from first to last. 

Our booklet on Varnishes will be sent you if you let us have your name 
and address. Write to-day- It's worth while. 

The Dougall Varnish Company, Limited 

J. S. N. DOUGALL, President 

MONTREAL - CANADA 

Associated with Murphy Varnish Co., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Making the Best Known Varnishes 
Still Better Known 

Thousands of dealers and users know the merit 
and standing of Berry Brothers' Varnishes, without 
the need of any further argument on our part. 

Years of good-quality service and consumer advertising have 
made "Berry Brothers" a household name. 

But every day it is becoming better known. Every day the 
label is made more and more familiar to all consumers — so 
familiar that it is recognized at sight on any dealer's shelves. 

Are you taking advantage of this growing popularity ? Is 
your varnish business increasing in proportion to the opportu- 
nity our reputation and advertising open up to you ? 

Berry Brothers* 
Business Buildere 

The Big-4 with which every 
dealer can most easily satisfy the 
quality-demands of his trade. 




For interior wood-work ex- 
posed to severe wear and finished 
in the full floss 



For front doors and all other 
surfaces exposed to the weather. 



BERRY BROTHERS, Limited 



The World's Largest Varnish Makers 

WALKERVILLE, ONT. 



Satinette 



(White Enamel) 

should be on every dealer's 
shelves if for no other reason 
than that it is one of the 
famous International Varnish 
Products, 

But — it has plenty of intrinsic- 
ally superior qualities to re- 
commend it besides that. 

Satinette is suited for de- 
corative work of every de- 
scription Gloss Interior and 
Flat Interior for interior 
work and Gloss Exterior for 
exterior work. 

Satinette is known all over the 
world as the white Enamel 
that stays white — it cannot 
become yellow. 

Architects, painters and dec- 
orators always think of 
Satinette now when they 
think of enamel. 

Satinette is the most perfect 
and durable white enamel 
ever made. 

It has great covering capacity 
and CANNOT TURN YELLOW. 

Like all International Products, 
Satinette is sold only in full 
Imperial Measure Cans. 




TORONTO 



WINNIPEG 



66 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 
HOUSE- 
KEEPER'S 
FRIEND 



W\ The'White" 
Mop Wringer 

They more than like it. 
They fall in love with it. 
You cannot buy them back. 
Loaned, they are sold in 
nearly every instance. 

They save the labor by 
performing it. 

They are neat, inexpensive, 
durable and agreeable 
HELPERS, 

Ask your jobber for them. 
If they will not supply you 
address: 

THE OLD RELIABLE 

White Mop Wringer Go. 

FoltonTllle, N.Y. 

Manufacturers of Mop Wringer 8 
exclusively 



This 

Trade Nark 

Ensures 

Genuineness 

Originality 

Perfection 

Satisfaction 







OAKEY'S 

The original and only 
Genuine Preparation for 
Cleaning Cutlery, 6d. 

and is. Canisters. ' 

' WELLINGTON ' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEV & SONS, Limited 

Manufacturer* of 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass 
•nd Flint C loths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 



; 



3>*S> 



The Michaelmass Fair 

AT LEIPZIG (Germany) for the WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TRADE will commence on 

SUNDAY, AUGUST 27th, 191 1 

and closes Sunday. September 17th. 
THE SAMPLE FAIR ( For CERAMIC. METAL-WARE. ETC.) to occupy the 

FIRST WEEK ONLY. 
THE LEATHER FAIR w jh open Wednesday, September 13th, and ihe 

FAIR EXCHANGE for the LEATHER INDUSTRY will be held ON THE SAME DAY 
from four to six o'clock P.M. in the large hall of the New Exchange on the Bluecherplatz. 
LODGINGS may be secured through the "Verkehrsverein. Handelshof. Naschmarkt." 

LEIPZIG. June 15th, 1911. 
THE COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF LEIPZIG. GERMANY 



^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦'^^^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦^♦ ; $>^^>4^>4k$>4 




HERCULES 



SASH CORD 



BUY THE BEST 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 
Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 
Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by All Wholesale Dealers 



NEW 

ERA 

PAINT 



Constant Satisfaction, 



NEW ERA PAINT is sold 
on merit, and its lasting 
qualities never fail to satisfy 
the most critical of buyers. 
Its ability as a surface 
coverer and its ability to 
keep in good condition 
satisfy your customers as no high-priced paint can 
satisfy — that's where NEW ERA wins out. 

PRICES AND PARTICULARS ON REQUEST. 

Standard Paint & Varnish Works Co. 



WINDSOR 



LIMITED 



ONTARIO 



Carbon Black Elastic Paint 

A SPECIAL ROOF PAINT 
LEAK PROOF AND FIRE RETARDENT 

Can be put on Felt, Tar-paper, Gunnysack, Shingles, Metal or any other material. 

Will not Crack in Winter or Melt in Summer. 

A most popular article that shows good profits to the merchant. 

■Write and we will send our traveller. 

Stocks on hand at Calgary, Saskatoon, Edmonton, Vancouver and Toronto. 

The Carbon Oil Works, Ltd. 



WINNIPEG 



HEAD OFFICE - WINNIPEG, CANADA 

Manufacturers of C.O.W.L. BRAND Paints, Stains, 

Wax Oils, and Oils -of -Tar, Specialties, etc. 



CANADA 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



You CAN teach an 
old dog new tricks 



lis this little story shows. 

A short time npo a mnn cnme 
to n certain dealer and asked for 
.an Auger bll (naming a well- 
known make). The salesman 
naked him if lie had ever tried 
n FORD, and explained its ad- 
vantages over the bit lie had call- 
ed Cor. The man would not lis- 
ten, saying he had used this 
same bll for years and wouldn't 
use any other. 

The salesman sold him the Bit, 
then banded him n Ford and 
Bald, "Take this home and re- 
turn the one you don't wish." 
' The next day he returned the 
other bit. his old favorite, and 
kept the FORD. 

What this proves 

Here was an actual working 
test with odds against the FORD 
— heavy odds, too, as the work- 
man was preiudiced against it. 
But the FORD won. 

This is convincing proof that 
the FORD is the superior Bit. 
It proves conclusively that it 
needs only to be tried to be used 
in preference to any other. 

It is one Bit you can recom- 
mend with confidence, and know 
it will make good every claim 
made for it. 

If you have your customers 
interested at heart, try the 
above plan next time you have 
a call for an Auger Bit other 
than the FORD. FORD buyers 
are steady customers. 

FORD AUGER BIT CO. 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



NICKEL 

The Canadian Copper Co. 

NICKEL FOR 
NICKEL STEEL 

The Orford Copper Co. 



WRITE US FOR 
PARTICULARS AND PRICES 



General Offices 

43 EXCHANGE PLAGE 

NEW YORK CITY 



{SEYMOUR SHEARS 



Have been the Standard tor over seventy years 
"OUALITY UNQUESTIONED" 

Ea«h pair of our shears bears the above trade mark 



TRADE MARK 




SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



Complete Line TRIMMERS', BANKERS' 
BARBERS' and TAILORS' SHEARS, etc., etc. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY 



WIEIUSCH & HILGER, LIMITED, NEW YORK, Agents 



A CONVENIENT CLOTHES RACK 




This High-grade rack can be fas- 
tened to the wall near a stove or range. 

When closed it projects only i 1-2 in. 
When extended, and all the bails are 
down, it stands out only 14 ins. from 
the wall and has a drying space of 19 
feet. 

Each bail can be lowered separately 
without interfering with the others. 

The sides of the rack ai e made of 
hardwood — the bails of galvanized 
steel, bent so as to be self supporting 
when in use. 

The price of the rack is $1.25 retail, 
manufacturers' price $9.00 per doz. 

This is a sure seller. Order from 
your wholesaler or direct from us. 

Modern Machinery Co. 

SARNIA, ONT. 



68 



-PUMPS- 

All Hinds 
Hay Unloading Tools. 
Barn Door Hangers. 

The word "MYERS'" assures 
QUALITY. Better write to us. 

F. E. MYERS & BRO. 

ASHLAND, OHIO 

J. H. ASHDOWN HARDWARE CO. 
Winnipeg, Calgary and Branch Houses 



Stand any old kind of racket! 

There's nothing so hsndy around house, store 
or farm as the 

BUSTER BROWN 

CHILDREN'S EXPRESS WAGON 

They're strongly made, easy running and well 
finished, and are a splendid selling line. 



IN 4 SIZES 
Write for Prices 

Western Representatives: 

JAS. STEWART MFG. CO., LTD. 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 




The Woodstock Wagon & 
Mfg. Co., Limited 



WOODSTOCK, 



ONTARIO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



EHle's Patent Lunch Box 

This is a cheap and convenient food carrier. The top and bottom are pressed out of 
sheet metal, and japanned. The sides are made of heavy waterproof canvas ; and when folded 
the box is not more than a quarter of an inch in thickness. 

Dimensions set up — 

7 'A x A l /z x 5 inches. 

Parcelled 1 doz. in a bundle; 

packed 1 gross in a case. 

Shipping weight per gross, 80 lbs. 

Prices on Application. 




READY FOR USE 



FOLDING UP 



FOLDED FOR POCKET 
MANUFACTURD BY 



E,. T. WRIGHT &t CO., Hamilton, Canada 

(H G. WRIGHT) 

Winnipeg agents, Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Man.; Vancouver agents, Macpherson & Teetzel, Vancouver, B.C.; 

Toronto agent, F. B. Wilson, 33 Maitland St., Toronto, Ont. Winnipeg agents, W. Reynolds & Co., Winnipeg, Man 



MAPLE LEAF 

11 Improved Racer" Cross Cut Saw 




This saw has proved itself to be the fastest cutting saw in use to-day. 
The cut illustrates the wide blade, but we also make this saw in 
a narrow pattern, thin back, which is especially well suited for small 
timber or pulpwood. All "MAPLE LEAF" saws are fully guaranteed. 

WHEN ORDERING SPECIFY "MAPLE LEAF" 

Shurly-Dietrich Co. 3 Limited 



GALT, ONTARIO 



and 



VANCOUVER, B.C. 



This Combination Makes the Safest Shaving Outfit Ob- 
tainable— Boker's "Radium" Finest Concaved Razor 

With Adjustable Guard 




With one of these guards 
and a Boker Razor you 
have a shaving outfit that 
will last a lifetime- Im- 
possible to cut yourself 
with this guard. 



AiffLMJSTABLE RAZOR GUAR 



y J u U J J J J J J J J J J u u J J 



Fits every Boker Razor, 
made of German Silver 
Nickel Plated. Neatest 
and most substantial 
Razor Guard on the mar- 
ket. ^< l„_ 



FOR SALE BY ALL LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



69 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



(c^c^cMop^b^koT^l J 



ORNAMENTAL/-- 4^ 

WORK 







-b^> 



WIRE GOODS 

PERFORATED METALS 
GENUINE ANTIQUE 
BRONZE FLY SCREEN CLOTH 

Canada Wire Goods Mfg. Co. 

HAMILTON. ONT. 



wAoAMAA y&KUKGis® 




Heavy Steel Hog Trough 

This trough is un- 
equalled in effici- 
ency by any other 
on the market 

It cannot leak, as 

it is absolutely rivetless and made 

from the best grade galvanized steel. 

We have in stock lengths from 4 to 12 feet, but 

will make odd lengths to fit any pen to order, at 




special prices. 



ERIE IRON WORKS, Ltd., 



ST. THOMAS, 
ONTARIO 



BLACK JACK 

THE BEST FAMILY POLISH MADE 



TRY IT. 



:qv:/vgk jack 

•■»(, '" "'•<. u '„"t" i " '"7. D -t> j* 10 * * e< : ' } 

i5*n STOVE POU* 1 » 



M-lb. tins — 3 doi. la case 



SOLD BY 

ALL 
JOBBERS 




^Talking to the Point 



CLASSIFIED WANT ADS get right 
down to the point at issue. If you want 

something, say so in a few well-chosen 
word*. Reader* like that sort of straight- 
f rom-the-shoulder-talk, and that is the rea- 
son why condensed ads are »o productive 
of the best kind of results. 

CLASSIFIED WANT ADS are always 
noticed. They are read by wide-awake, 
intelligent grocers, who are on the look 
out for favorable opportunities to fill 
their 



TRY A CONDENSED AD IN 
THIS PAPER 



The EUREKA 



is the best tool for digging post holes 
any size. Also for sinking posts 
heaved by frost. It cuts off roots — 
lifts out stones, etc. —works in sand, 
clay, gravel or muck. If your jobber 
will not supply them, write us. 

We also make Wire Stretchers for 
building Wire Fences, Drive Well 
Points, Drive Caps, Shoes, Cylinders 
and Pumps. 

Otterville Mfg. Co., Limited 

OTTERVILLE. . ONTARIO 



Cap Screws, Set Screws, Studs 

Spec/a/ Milled Work 

Cold Pressed Nuts 

Uniform Product, Aoouratoly Maohlned 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY 



MONTREAL 

HALIFAX 

OTTAWA 



LIMITID 

HEAD OFFICES 

TORONTO 

CANADA 



WINNIFEO) 
VANCOUVER 
ROSSLAND 



JOSEPH RODGERS & SONS 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. "»'"» 

Avoid imitations of our 



CUTLERY *\j£ j¥^ * A 

exact I _jS^ 

~~ TED \^ 



By seeing that this 
mark is on each blade 



SOLE AGENTS FOR CANADA 

James Hutton £§» Company 

MONTREAL 



A Strong Selling Point 




This combination Nut and Pipe Wrench has a 

very strong selling point— Double Efficiency 

Its handiness and strength at once appeal to the good mechanic to 

save him time and trouble. You can sell a lot of these Wrenches — 

make a start by writing to-day for our catalog. 

BEMIS & CALL HARDWARE & TOOL GO. 

Springfield, Mass., U.S.A. 




70 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



O.K. TMIIVI 




These Thimbles are easily adjusted and eannotget out of order because 
they have no springs. They are the only real good Stove Pipe Thimbles 
in the market. For sale by leading jobbers, and manufactured exclu- 
velyby 



METAL 5H/MLE &5IDINC C? LTD. 

PRESTON & MONTREAL 



ARE 
YOU 
ALIVE 



To the possibilities which a Want 

Ad. in Hardware and Metal 

holds for you ? Do you know that 
for a few cents you can gain the 
attention of every hardware re- 
tailer, wholesaler, manufacturer and 
clerk in Canada ? 

RATES : payable in advance. 
2C. per word first insertion, 
ic. per word subsequent insertions. 
5c. extra if box number is desired. 

Hardware and Metal 

TORONTO - MONTREAL- WINNIPEG 



WOOD SCREWS 




The 20th Century 
Patent Socket Head Screws Drive Easier, 

Drive Quicker, Never Slip Driver. 
Mend us an or der and give them a trial. 

RIVETS, BURRS, WASHERS 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 

P. L. Robertson Mfg. Co., Ltd., Milton, Ont. 



BRASS ROD 

Prompt delivery from stock 



OIVJ 



Glues, Gelatines, Size, Etc. 

Quality counts in these lines, as in 
others. Fifty years' experience 
enables us to offer goods that for 

QUALITY and VALUE 

cannot be excelled. 

Supplied through Merchants, Jobbers, etc., only. 

THE GROVE CHEMICAL CO., LTD. 

Established 185 9 Appley Bridge, Wigan, Lanes, England 



WALL PLASTER 

THE "EMPIRE" BRANDS MANU- 
FACTURED ONLY BY 

The Manitoba Gypsum Co. 

, LIMITED 

Winnipeg, Manitoba 



GROW, DEALERS! SPREAD OUT! 

Put yourself in a position to take any kind of a roofing 
contract. With 




\ , A , A A ' A A 



A V-A A 



"CROWN" 



PATENT 
STEEL 



SHINGLES 



you have a better proposition than the slater can possibly 
offer. Get some (or all) of that business you've had to 
lose to him for so long Get started to-day — right now, 
by writing for our catalogue and price lists. At the same time we'll send you our samples, 

charges prepaid. Write at once to 

McFARLANE 6 DOUGLAS, Limited, 250-260 siater street, Ottawa, Ont. 



71 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DIRECTORY OF MANUFACTURERS 

Hardware and Metal receives, almost dally, enquiries for the names of manufacturers of various lines. 
These enquiries come from wholesalers, munufacturers and retail dealers, who usually Intimate they 
have looked through Hardware and Metal but cannot find any firm advertising the line in question. 
In many cases these firms are anxious to secure the information at once. This page enables manu- 
facturers to keep constantly before the trade lines which it would not pay to advertise in larger space. 



BATTERY ZINCS 



FIRE BRICK. 



Battery Zincs, Fuse 
Wire, Wire Solder 

Th« CANADA METAL CO., LTD 
31 William St., Toronto 



BOLT8. 



Carriage Bolts, Machine Bolts, Coach 
Screws, S. & S. Hinges, Cross Arm 
Braces and Pins, Pole Steps, Nuts, etc. 
Plain and galvanized. Ask for prices. 

London Bolt & Hinge Works 

London, Canada 

BUILDERS' SUPPLIES. 



Bell Phone 3033 



P. O Box 367 



Bosse <3& Banks 

Steel Beams. Columns. Plates, Gas and 

Water Pipes. Contractors' Municipal 

and Builders' Supplies Machinery 

and Specialties. 

Board of Trade Building 

39 St. Paul St., - QUEBEC 



CHAPLETS. 




ERIE GREY IRON 
CHAPLETS 

All Foundry Supply 
Jobbers. 

S. Cheney & Son, Manlius. N.Y. 



aup-?%*z 



PRIEST'S CUPPEEtSi f 

THATS If 

SUFFICIENT.^ 

etSIr WOm CATALOGUE TO •■*■? 

juaorieu Shearer ■!». Co, Swims, ■ JW>* 
Weboah & Hilger, limited, special New York 
Representatives, loft-110 Lafayette Street 





EMERY WHEELS. 



Canadian 

Hart Wheels 

443 Barton St. East, Hamilton 

Corundum and Emery Wheel* 

Grinding Msohloes, Bearer 

Oil Stone*. 



Silica Bricks, Fire Bricks, Fire Clay, 
Silica Cement, Ganister Composition 

For material graded to withstand the in- 
tensest heat or moderate heat, apply to 

A. Y. DINAS SILICA BRICK & LIME CO.. LTD. 
118, Oueen Street. Glasgow. Scotland 



FILTERS. 



faLVO FILTER fiSTERlLlZER 




FLOOR SPRINGS. 



The Best Door Oloeer la 
Newman's Invincible Floor Spring 

Will oloee a door silently s«sinst any pressure of wind 
Hse mMiy working advantages over the ordinary spring 
and han twice the wear. In use throughout Great Britain 
ind the colonies. Giveeperfeotsataslaotion. Madeonlyby 

W. NEWMAN a SONS 
Hospital St. - - - - Birmingham 



GAS CONTROLLERS. 



WRITE FOR NEW PRICES 
ON GAS CONTROLLERS 

Canadian Gas Users' 
Association 

633-635 Queen Street W. 
TORONTO 

Eastern Repre.— J. S. Mullen, 
1749 Park Ave. , Montreal, Que. 
Western Repre.— The Moffat 
Stove Co., Ltd., 248 Princess 
Street, Winnipeg, Man. 




HORSE POKES. 




Our Surprise Horse 
and Cattle Halter 
Pokes are the best. 

Manufactured by 

James & Reid 

Perth, Ont. 



IRON. 



IRON and STEEL 

OF ALL DESCRIPTIONS 
Brass, Copper, Zinc, etc 

David C. Mitchell & Company, 

118 Queen Street, Glasgow, Scotland. 





LAMP 


BLACK. 




L. MARTIN COMPANY 

Tin- world's large*! manufacturers nf 

l_ a m pblacks 

i'i'2 years' reputation behind every package. 

See our quarter-page advertisement appearing e\rry 

alternate issue of " Hardware »t Metal.'" 

lew York Philadelphia Cincinnati London, Eng. 



MALLBABLE IRON. 



A want ad. in Hardware 

and Metal will bring 

replies from all parts 

of Canada. 



MANUFACTURERS' AGENT. 



Western Distributors, Limited 

CUSTOMS BROKERS 
Wholesale Commission Merchants and 
Manufacturers' Agents. Cars Distribut- 
ed, Warehoused and Forwarded. Ware- 
house on Transfer Track. Business 
solicited. 

OUR POSITION IS TODR OPPOR- 
TUNITY. 
SASKATOON, WESTERN CANADA. 



MOOSE JAW 

Whit lock & Marlatt 

Distributing and Forwarding Agents 

Warehouse on C.P.R. spur track 

PROMPTNESS sad SATISFACTION GUARANTIED 

Buxlnom* Solicited. 



JAS. BISSET & CO. 

MANUFACTURERS' AGENTS 
260 St. Paul St., QUEBEC, QUE. 

Cars distributed, warehoused and 
forwarded. 

BUSINESS SOLICITED. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
18 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing < SaaacUaa, British and Ame 
Manufacturers. Correspondence invited from 
firms wishing- to be represented. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



PLOW CASTINGS. 



Castings of all Kinds. 

Write us for our list of 
Plow Castings. 

The Hilborn Co., Ayr, Ontario. 



BTVETS AND STEEL PRODUCTS. 



The PARMENTEE BULLOCH CO., Ltd. 

GANANOQUE, ONT. 

Iron and Copper Rivets, Iron and Copper Burrs, 
Blfuretted and Tubular Rivets, Wire Nalia, 
Copper and Steel Boat and Canoe Nails, 
Escutcheon Pins, Leather Shoe and Overshoe 
Baekles, Felloe Plates. 



SHELF BRACKETS. 
Will Hold Up a Shelf 

That's what a shelf brac- 
ket's for. For this pur- 
pose there can be Nothing 
Nothing Cheaper than the 
Bradley Steel Bracket. It is well 
Japanned, Strong and Light. The 
saying on freight is a good profit 
aside from the lower price at which 
the goods are sold. Order direct or 
through your jobber. 
ATLAS MFG. CO., NEW HAVEN 




Better, 



SHELF BOXES. 




Goods Well Displayed areHalf Sold ! 

. The most attractive, most dW 
able and most serviceable sh«tf 
box on the market is the 

BENNETT STEEL 

HARDWARE SHELF BOX 

StvaXO% Shrlf «x»n 
ovrr <ho*4** torn 

write br Catalogue oniPnulitt. 
CAMEftOH «*■ CAMPBELL 
"BSTonbo: 



SPRAYERS. 



ft 



Sprayers 



a 



Our 1911 Sprayers are better than ever, 
four different kinds this year, to suit all 
tastes and purposes. You ought to see our 
new whirlwind or continuous sprayer. It's 
a comer. A post card will bring a cata- 
logue. Manufactured by 
THE COLLINS MFG. CO. - TORONTO 



STANCHIONS 



OK CANADIAN U BAR STEEL 

Stanchions and Stalls 

'are guaranteed not to let the cattle 
loose, and are absolutely sanitary.' 

Canadian Potato Machinery Co., Limited 



208 Stone Road 



Gait, Ont. 



TIMBER JACKS. 



TREWHELLA BROS. 

AUSTRALIAN MONKEY JACKS 

for clearing land of TREES, ROOTS and STOMPS 

They aresimple, powerful, 
reliable, exceditious. A 
neoeaaarv tool for every 
farmer. 




TREWHELLA BROS 

9 Aim a Street, Smethwick, 
Birmingham, Bng , and Trentham. Victoria, Auat. 




TOOL HOLDERS. 

AN ARMSTRONG BORING TOOL 

is always ready for use. Should be 
on every lathe. 8ave» all forging 
70% Grinding; 90 % tool steel. 
Write for Catalog. 



ARMSTRONG 

BROS. TOOL CO. 

106 N. Francisco 
Ave. 

DHICACO, U. 8. A. 






TRUCKS 

Watson's Trucks 

Every Factory, Mill, Whole- 
sale or Retail Store and 
Warehouse in your locality 
requires Trucks. 
We make Trucks for every 
purpose. Catalogue and Prices 
for the asking. 

John Watson Mfg. Co., Limited, 

Ayr, Ont. Winnipeg, Man. 



CHARLES LINDSAY 

Rumford Works, 33 Great Hamilton Street 
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 

Manufacturer of all classes Brass and Copper 
Kerbs, Fire Irons, Coal Vases, Interior Grates, Etc., 
Etc. Write for Catalogue 

Canadian Representative— H. L. SOPER 
Post Office Box 1975 - - - WINNIPEG 



WIRE SPRINGS. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF 

WIRE SPRINGS 

for COMPRESSION and EXTENSION 

James Steele, Limited, Guelph 



NOVA SCOTIA STEEL 
6 COAL CO., Limited, 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 



Manufacturers of 



CLOTHES WRINGERS. 



The Estate of O. D. COWAN 

GANANOQUE, ONTARIO 

CLOTHES WRINGERS- 1 to 3 years' guarantee 
FLEXIBLE DRAG TOOTH HARROWS 

Agents / Asselln & McMaster, 207 St. James St., Montreal 
I J. ». Girard. Quebec, Que. 



FERRONA 
PIG IRON 

and SIEMENS-MARTLN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



The INFALLIBLE GLAZIER'S DIAMOND 



Just the Too! for Inexperienced Glass Cutlers 




Made by 

A. SHAW & SON, London, Eng. 

GODFREY S. PELTON & SON, Canadian Agents, MONTREAL 

Sharratt & Newth's Glaziers' Diamonds 

are unequalled for cutting and wearing qualities. 




To be obtained in a great variety of patterns from Dealers in 
Glass, Hardware and Painters' Supplies. 

GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK E£ a /.»«£ B Woo " mn p,ek * t8 °" 

WIRE NAILS, OILED SPRING 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 




The Western Wire and Nail Co., Limited, 



London, Ont. 



Two Cents per Word 



You can talk across the continent for 
two cents per word in a Hardware and 
Metal Want Ad. 



73 



HARDWARE AND METAI, 





The McGlashan, Clarke 12 Dwt. Kill'veS 



are made of the best Crucible Steel, finished by methods developed during years of success- 
ful manufacture, plated with 12 dwts. pure silver, put up in neat Rack Boxes containing one- 
half dozen. Every box contains our guarantee. Write for catalogue of quick-selling spec iallies. 

The McGlashan, Clarke Co., Ltd., Niagara Falls, Canada 



THE SPECIAL FEATURES IN MAXWELL'S 

Champion High-Speed Washer 

make it a winner against all competition Made of Red Cypress (the wood that 
lasts a lifetime), with both crank and top lever drive, heavy balance wheel, and 
extension wringer attachment, allowing practically the whole top to open, the 
CHAMPION catches the fancy of the woman who sees it for the first time, and 
wins the warm recommendations of the woman who uses it. 

It pays to link up your store with such successes as the CHAMPION. 

David Maxwell <3& Sons, St. Mary's, Ontario 




Good Pumps-- 
with Good Profits 



We are looking for the pump dealer who 
knows that selling good pumps pays in good-will. 

McDougall Pumps are 
well made, properly fitted, 
good through and through. 
"Aremacdee" Brand. 

Every pump sold stays 
sold and stays in good order. 

Metal Hand or Motor 
Pumps— for Force or Lift 
use — every size, style, kind, in our big catalogue. 
Write 

The 

R. McDougall Co., limited 

GALT, CANADA 




The Aylmer 
Windmill 
Force Pump 



Mr. Dealer : It will pay you 
to write for our illustrated 
Catalogues of Double and 
Single Acting Force and Lift, Hand, 
Windmill and Power Pumps; Hay, Stock, 
Portable Platform, Union, Dairy and 
Butcher Scales. Goods right and prices 
are right. 

The Aylmer Pump & Scale Co, Limited 

AYLMER, : ONTARIO 

WESTERN REPRESENTATIVES : 

The Ontario Wind Engine & Pump Co., Limited 

WINNIPEG AND CALGARY 




74 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



N 
O 
T 
E 

T 

H 
E 

P 

O 

I 

N 
T 
S 



BANNER 



GOLD 
BLAST 



LANTERN 




YOU GET VALUE IN 

WORKMANSHIP 

MATERIAL 

AND 

DESIGN 

THAT MEANS 

SATISFIED 

CUSTOMERS 



ASK YOUR JOBBER 



HE HAS THEM 



Ontario Lantern & Lamp Co., Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 



B 
O 
O 

s 

T 

T 

H 
E 

S 
A 
L 
E 



A Guarantee of Absolute Quality Perfection 

is possible in our product, to the exclusion of other makes, by the fact that in 
our chain the weld is actually the strongest part of the link. 



The swell 

u uarantees 

the weld. 




The swell 

guarantees 

the weld. 



The chain illustrated above was pulled perfectly rigid with a stock break, after which the 
welds were hammered flat in an endeavour to part the welds or show any defects. 



Office; 
BUFFALO, N.Y. 



McKinnon Chain Co. 



Factory c 
J ATHARINES, OMT. 



THE 



MORRIS & BAILEY STEEL CO. 

PITTSBURG, PA. 



Manufacturers of 



COLD ROLLED STRIP STEEL 

For Deep Drawing, Blanking, Forming, all kinds of Bending. Has Bright Finish 
for Nickel Plating, Rolled accurate to Gauge. Made in all tempers and in any 
thickness from .002" to .250 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



IRON AND STEEL 

Bars, Hoops, Angles, Beams, Channels, etc. 

Galvanized and Black Sheets, all grades. 

Tinplates Canada Plates 

METALS 

Antimony, Copper, Tin, Lead, Zinc. 

PIGJRON 

M. ®> L. Samuel, Benjamin ®> Co. 

Corner King Street, and Spadina Avenue 

Toronto 




STRONGEST, SAFEST, 
MOST SATISFACTORY 

That's why you should specify 
the 

"National" Steel Rim 

LOCKS 

The simplicity in construction 
and grade of materials used 
assure absolute satisfaction 
with every sale. 



The National has 
got a quick selling 
ability that others 
lack — better inves- 
tigate it at at once 

Prices on 
request. 

NATIONAL 
HARDWARE 
CO., Limited 

ORILLIA, ONT.. 
CANADA. 




Up-to-date Urns 

that introduce "Real Econ- 
omy" to the user. High 
C lja s s Hotels, Restaurants 
and Cafes buy[them on 
sight and are always 
satisfied with the re- 
sults. 

Our Urns'are attractive- 
ly designed and made 
from the finest material. 
They are easy to clean, 
absolutely sanitary and 
rustproof. 

We solicit your inquiry 
for fuller information — 
write at once. 

THE BUFFALO 
MFG. CO., Buffalo, N.Y. 

Canadian Representatives 

H. F. Mcintosh & Co., 
28 Toronto St., Toronto 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



Pink's 

Lumbering 

Tools 

Made in Canada 

The Standard] Tools 
in every province 
of the Dominion, 
New Zealand, 
Australia, Etc. 

We manufacture all 
kinds of lumber 
tools. 

Light and Durable 

Send for catalogue 

and price list. 

Long Distance 

Phone No. 87 

1 

Sold throughout the Dominion by all Wholesale and Retail Hardware Merchants. 




Trad* 

o 



Mark 





THE HIGHEST QUALITY 

IS FOUND IN 

"W&B" Drop Forged Wrenches, because they 
are forged from selected steel, are accurately milled 
and highly finished. 

Our line is the largest and most complete in styles 
and sizes in Canada, and we make prompt shipments. 

Send us your orders, or write us for catalogue 
and prices. 

THE WHITMAN C& BARNES MFG. CO. 

St. Catharines, :: :: Ontario 




Trade 

W&B 
Mark 





/ I 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Profitable Saws 

We offer the ambitious merchant the most profitable Saw proposi- 
tion in the world. Ours is not a campaign with the object of 
securing your order at any cost or by any means 

A SELLING PLAN 

But is a carefully worked out plan whereby we work together to 
build business for each other. It's co-operative and profitable 
"We help You to Sell" and then we expect re-orders. Write us 
for full information. 



We make Hand Wood, Panel, Rip and Small Saws, Cross-Cuts 
Metal Saws. A Perfect Saw for Every Purpose. No 190 




E. C. ATKINS & CO., Inc. 

HomilMn C\r%i- MAKERS OF STERLING SAWS 

AldlHllLOIl, Will. U.S. Factory, Indianapolis, Ind. 



WHEELBARROWS 

for Every Purpose 

We have so many different styles — Bar- 
rows for Railroad or Canal Construc- 
tion, Garden and Farm, Stone, Metal, 
Mortar, Contractors', Concrete, Etc, Etc. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue 
THE LONDON FOUNDRY CO., LTD. 

London - Canada 
Toronto Warehouse, 1 9 Jarvis St., F. J. Schuch, A gen 




Have the Agency 
in Your>Town for the 



Simonds 



" Crescent 
Ground " 



Cross-Cut Saws 




It will mean a good seller for you. The Saws can be purchased through your jobber or from any of our 
offices. Good profit and quick sales. You are at liberty to guarantee Simonds "Crescent Ground" Cross- 
Cut Saws to cut 10 per cent, more timber, same time and labor being used, than any other Cross-Cut Saw 
in the world. 

SIMONDS CANADA SAW CO., Limited, Montreal, P.Q. St. John,N.B. Vancouver, B.C. 

— — — ■ 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



STANDARD CHAIN COMPANY 




COIL, RAILROAD, LOGGING, DREDGE, STEAM SHOVEL, WAGGON and 

BRIGHT CHAIN of all kinds. 
EVERYTHING IN WELDED CHAIN. 
Write for prices Prompt shipment. 

ELECTRIC WELDED TRACES A SPECIALTY 

Selling Agents : ALEXANDER GIBB, 13 St. John St., MONTREAL 



Get Our Prices and Get to Thinking, That Is All We Ask 

THIS MANTEL 

Is Artistic, Ornamental and Substantial. 90 other designs of 
the same quality. Gas and Coal Grates and Fireplace Fittings, 
also a complete line of Gas and Electric Fixtures. 

WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE LIST. 
Test us, every test is one more triumph. 

OUR TRADE EXTENDS FROM COAST TO COAST 

The Barton Netting Company, Limited 

38 Ouelette Avenue, Windsor, Ont. 




THE CONNOR BALL-BEARING WASHER 

Withthehinged 
cover now used 
on tbis Washer 
it it no longer 
necessary for 
the operator to 
place the cover 
and rubbing 
board dripping 
wet onto the 
kitchen floor. 
With this hing- 
ed rubber and 
cover the water 
drips back into 
the machine. It 
Is easily han- 
dled. And other 
features of this 
machine are a 
detachable tub; 
no iron running 
through the bot- 
tom of the tub; 
Cypress Tubs: 
nicely finished 
Ball • Bearings 
and Motor Springs do most of the work. 

Have you the agency for this washer? If not, write at 
once for sample, prices, terms, etc. You will find it the 
most satisfactory machine you ever handled. 




J. H. CONNOR & SON, LTD., 

Merrick-Anderson Co., Winnipeg, Agents for Manitoba, Saskatchewan and 
Alberta. Geo. D. Horsman, 8J8 Oranrille 8t., Vanoourer, Agent for 
British Columbia. 



Manufacturers. 
OTTAWA 



A Common Sense Talk 



AIR IS CHEAP. You do not pay rates for air like you do for water, yet 
a big fuss is made over the impurity of water and very often no thought is 
taken of the impurity of the air breathed from day to day and night tonight. 

Crowded rooms, whether in public places, schools, opera houses or 
actories, require ventilation as well as the private dwellings. 
House Building is a Science Nowadays and no Building is Complete 
Without one of our J. W. Harris Ventilators. 

The Ventilator Itself is an Ornament 
and can be made to suit the character of the 
building, either as to size or as to quality 
of material. 

Montreal, Dec 4th, 1905 
Messrs. J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd . 

City 
Dear Sirs,— 

In answer to your letter of tha 25th ult., I 
must say that I am very much satisfied with the 
results of the"ZEPHYR" Ventilators. 

Yours truly, 
W. Champagne, 

191 St. Paul St. 

Dealers everywhere will find a double profit 
in handling this ventilator. Write direct 
for catalogue and booklet to-day. 

Learn about our system of ventilating. A 
pleasure to send books. 

The J. W. Harris Mfg. Co., Ltd. 

General Contractors ana Manufacturers 




LVI 



79 



HARDWARE AND METAL 








A Britisher Buys a "ROSS" Match Rifle 
and then "Licks Creation" 

Cable advices state that Private Blood, of the Irish team, has won first place 
in the "Bass," the "Edge," the " Halford Memorial," the "Wimbledon 
Cup," and the " Hopton Grand Aggregate" competitions, using a "Ross" 
Rifle and "Ross" Ammunition. 

The " Ross " Rifle either for sporting or target use is the one for you to re- 
commend. It is made in Canada — is absolutely at the top for accuracy, 
finish and price value, and gives you a satisfactory margin of profit. 

If you have none in stock write at once 
for Illustrated catalogue and discounts 

THE ROSS RIFLE CO., Quebec, P.Q. 



There is a tide in the affairs of men 
Which if taken at the flood 
Leads on to fortune 

— Julius Caesar 




HEADQUARTERS 
FOR 

Lead Pip* 
Lead Waste 

Traps and Bends 
Sheet Lead 
Solder, &c. 



Do not HeSltate When the right opportunity presents itself. 

In the race for fortune, the man who grasps his opportunities is the man who wins 



A word to the wise is sufficient. 



Never be without a stock of 



HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE 

(THE COPPER COATED CAKE) 

THE BABBITT METAL WITHOUT A FAULT 



It is used from Coast to Coast. Is highly satisfactory wherever used. 

A Good thing and specify HARRIS HEAVY PRESSURE. Experience has proven that it posi- 
tively eliminates friction and runs cool at any speed. 
tj » T5TMXT A T*> TT^TV yfT^IVT T^ - 1VT /"N 1 X T A EOOd thing and buy the Babbitt Metal without a fault. HARRIS HEAVY 



ENGINEERS KNOW 



THE CANADA METAL COMPANY LTD. 



PRESSURE is good to stock. It brings repeat orders. 

Fraser Avenue, TORONTO 

80 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Uniformity of Quality 
Prompt Delivery 

Adaptability 
Standard Weight 

Points to remember in connec- 
tion with Canada Cement when 
making specifications. 

Canada Cement Co. 

Limited 
MONTREAL TORONTO WINNIPEG CALGARY 



Mr. Hardware Merchant 




If you want quality, 
combined with price, 
you cannot do better 
than to buy 

B. H. & L. Mfg. Co.'s 

line of 

Builders' Hardware 

We especially re- 
commend to you our 
bevelled design sets. 



The Belleville Hardware & Lock Mfg. Co., 

BELLEVILLE, limited ONTARIO 






Salem 



Kingston 



Morrow 



"New Designs" 

Peterborough Lock Mfg. Co., Ltd. T^nne 
PETERBOROUGH ONTARIO 







Irwin 



Avon 



Stratton 



"New Designs" 

See Our 1911 Supplement 

CANADA 



/(JFK/M Measuring Tapes 

are to-day recognized as the Standards of Accuracy, Design 
and Workmanship. Each is made to sustain the Reputation 
gained by a Quarter Century's endeavor. Used by all experi- 
enced consumers. The wise merchant has them for sale. 



sold by all jobbers 7H E fl/FKFN Rl/LE fip. OF t?ANADAj,Tl>. 

W/NDSOfcONT. 



SBND FOR CATALOGUE 




II A i: I) WARE AND METAL 



Mm. 1868 




Inc. 1895. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Co. 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve . a »9*^^^*4** MedaU 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1891 

Copy of cata- 
logue sent free 
to any inter- 
sated file user 
upon applies* 
tion. 




Nitrate of Lead 

Best English Make 
5 Cwt. Casks. 

Stock or Import 

B. & S. H. Thompson & Co. 

LIMITED 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



GOLD MEDAL 
WORLD'S EXPOSITION, BRUSSELS, 1010 




VALVE DISCS 



SSMM'^a 






"PRACTICALLY INDESTRUCTIBLE" 

For long and satisfactory service. 

nothing to equal them has 

ever been made. 



Manufactured solely by 

TNE CUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED 
Toronto Montreal Halifax Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver 



GET THE GENUINE 

Stanley 
Steel Butts \ Hinges 

There are no others 
"just as good." 

Look for the 

TRADf 




Mar* 



Printed on the labels. 
Stamped on the butts. 

It is a guaranty of quality. 

THE STANLEY WORKS 



NEW BRITAIN 

A. MACFARLANE. MONTREAL 



CONN. - U.S.A. 
CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE 



HAMAKi«°METAL 

Published Weekly by 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING COMPANY, LIMITED 

Montreal: 701-702 Eastern Townships Bank Bid*. Toronto: 143-14* University Ave. Winnipeg: 34 Royal Bank Bid* 

New York: 115 Broadway. London. Eng.: 88 Fleet St.. E.C. 



VOL. XX II. 



PUBLICATION OFFICE: TORONTO, JULY 29, 1911 



NO 30 




PEPPERCORN^DIAMONC 

))K TRADE MARK ^, < 



Canadian Agents, DORKtCN BROS. & CO. MONTRDAL 



You may forget the price of 




"Queen's 

Head" 

Galvanized Iron 

But the excellent quality is not forgotten. 



CANADA 



John Lysaght, Limited 

Makers 
Bristol, Newporl and Montreal 



A. C. Leslie & Co., Limited 

Montreal 
Managers Canadian Branch 



99 



"TA YLOR-FORBES 

WROUGHT STEEL - BALL BEARING 

Chief Spring 
FLOOR HINGE 

is built for service and contains the 
finest obtainable material, assuring 
long life and hinge efficiency. 




■ ifl 





They can easily be installed without cutting mortise in floor 
and are so constructed that water cannot get into working parts 
and cause corrosion The tension of the spring can be handily 
adjusted at any tims 

First piece of lower cut is pivot for upper jamb. 

Second piece is socket for top ot door. 

Third piece is hinge for door 

Write for prices and full particulars. 

Taylor- Forbes Co., Ltd. 

Guelph, - Ontario 

REPRESENTED BYi-Taylor-Forbes Co, Ltd.. 246 Craig St. W.. Montreal : 
H G. Kogers-53}4Dock Street. St. John, N.B ; W. A. MacLennan-Vancouver. 
B'C • J B. H. Rickaby— Victoria. B C ; H. F- Moulder, & Son— Travellers 
Building. Winnipeg. Canadian United Mfrs. Agency, London, ling. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



<3iq(3ei> 



A \Vatp*ili( 



Sleepmeter 




Height 7 inches. Dial 4-]^. inches. 
Rings steadily for 5 minutes, intermittently for 10. 



HERE'S Big Ben — he's not quite a year old, 
but in less than a year, he' s proven in the 
States the biggest clock success that we have 
ever known. — Today, ten months after his 
appearance, 12,000 jewelers — r60 per cent, of the total 
United States number — sell him at the rate of 2,000 a day, 
at the highest figure that's ever been quoted. 

We have now completed steps to introduce Big Ben to 
the Canadian trade on as extensive 'a scale as we did in 
the United States. Beginning with September we will ex- 
tend our campaign to all the leading Canadian publications 
and in order to enable Canadian dealers to get the max- 
imum benefit from our advertising, we are packing Big 



Ben specially for Canadian trade, 6 in a carton with a 
full set of Store Selling Helps (2 posters, 2 show cards, 2 
metal signs). 

On an order for 12 we add a solid mahogany display 
stand. On an order for 24 or more we print your name 
on dials, give you the posters, display stand and a beautiful 
metal sign lithographed in five colors. 

The retail Canadian price has been fixed at #3.00. You 
can sell him for more if you want but you may not sell 
him for less. — Big Ben is already carried in stock by 34 
Canadian wholesalers. We shall be glad to let you have 
their names upon request. 



In broken and dozen lots, $2.20 less 5%. In case lots of 24, $2.10 less 5 %. 

The Western Clock Mfg. Co. 
La Salle, Illinois 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Carborundum Sharpening Stones 

Advertising has created 
a tremendous demand 
for Carborundum 
Sharpening Stones — 
a demand that is up to 
the hardware dealer to 
fill. We are doing our 
share by backing up 
our advertising with 
stones that give a better 
edge in less time; stones 
that do not glaze or fill; 
that wear uniformly, 
last longer, and are 
positively revolutioniz- 
ing tool sharpening. 
You simply cannot offer something "just as good." Better write to-day — now— for full information 
regarding Carborundum stones. There is a Carborundum stone for the carpenter, artisan, mechanic, 
barber, sportsman, housewife — in fact, any one who has a knife or tool to sharpen can get a 
Carborundum stone to do it immeasurably better than ever before. 

Ask about our Free Display Case Offers, Catalogs, Trade Helps, Window Displays, Etc. 
Let us get you started in making your sharpening stone business a big profit producer. 

The Carborundum Company, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 




Have You Seen These 

New "Yankee" Tools? 



No. 1530 Hand Drill for holes up to 3-16 in. 

Takes round shank drills. Has the famous Automatic 
Double Ratchet movement the same as our other "Yankee" 
geared Drills, so helpful in many ways especially at close 
quarters where only part turn of crank can be obtained. 
The wood Handle has magazine for drill points. A fine 
tool for metal workers, amateur mechanics, etc. 

No. 130 Quick Return 

Same tool as the No. 30 but with a 
Spring inserted in the Handle to 
drive the spindle back quickly, 
ready for the next push. A great 
advantage for overhead work or 
where only one hand can be used. 
Takes all the Attachments used in 
the No. 30. 

No. 75 Push Brace 

Bores holes up to % inches in hard 
woods and % inches in white pine, 
quicker and easier than a Bit 
Brace. Drives and draws screws — 
takes all the small tools and works 
In close quarters where a Bit Brace 
cannot be used. Bearing down on 
the Handle drives it with that 
quick and easy motion of the 
"Yankee" Spiral Driver. 




They are catching the Mechanics. 
Better let your Jobber quote at once. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SIGNS OF QUALITY 

ON GOOD 

Washers, Wringers and Churns 

ARROW 






BRAND 

YOU'LL SEE THEM AT THE BUSY STORES 

They're Trade Winners. No other line begins to equal 
them for Quality, Distinctiveness, Finish or Salability. 



THEY MEAN PROFIT TO DEALER AND SATISFACTION TO USER 



Eastern Agents , W. L. Haldimand & 
Son, Montreal, Que. 

Western Agents, H. F. Moulden & Son, 
Winnipeg, Man, 



CUMMER - DOWSWELL, Limited 



HAMILTON, 



ONTARIO 



Tfc S.M.P. GALVANIZED WARE 



Galvanized Buckets 




No. 160, with Roll Rim Bottoms. 
Heavy Malleable Ears, riveted 
and reinforced. The Bucket for 
the Contractor, the Railroad and 
for where it gets hard usage. 



A strong, durable basket, unex- 
celled for handling grain, fruits, 
roots, etc. 

Small Size : — Inches, 13| x 9£. 
Large Size -.—Inches, 17f x llf. 

PRICES ON APPLICATION 



Galvanized Baske s 




Corrugated Bottoms 

Small size supplied with either 
bails or side handles. 



THE SHEET METAL PRODUCTS COMPANY 



OF CANADA 
Montreal 



Successors to KEMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

TORONTO 



LIMITED 

Winnipeg 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



POLICE GOODS 

Carried in Stock by Us 






POLICE CLUB OR BILLY 





POLICE CALL OR WHISTLE 



We Want YOU to Know — Where you can get these goods. 

Your Order will be shipped promptly from our stock. You won't have to wait and worry 
while a Special Order is sent to the factory. 

Your Police and Constabulary— Buy these goods frequently. 

You can sell them as Low, as Easily and as Satisfactorily as Anyone, and thereby add 

a tidy sum to your Profit Account. 

Besides, Policemen are good customers for Revolvers, Holsters and Ammunition. 

Our Catalogue NO. 46 — Just off the Press. ( Write us for it at once.) 

Illustrates and describes this line so clearly that sales can be made with it as 
easily as with samples. 

TAKE A SHOT AT THIS LIKE AHD SEE IF YOU DON'T MAKE GOOD 

LEWIS BROS., Limited, Montreal 



OTTAWA 



TORONTO 



VANCOUVER 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



II 



THE NAME 



6* 



MILFORD" 



IS FAMILIAR WITH ALL GOOD MACHINISTS 



^ 



Made of the 




Best Steel 



MILFORD BLADES 



"Milford Blades" 
are guaranteed to save 
over 75 per cent, in Hack 
Saw Blade expense. 




RELIABLE BLADES 



GIVE 



GOOD RESULTS 



MILFORD POWER HACK SAWS 

No. 4. CAPACITY 5 in. x 5 in. No. 6. CAPACITY 8 in. x 8 in. 

The Milford Blades are used by the best Machinists in America and are giving 

the best of satisfaction. 

Increase Your Sales 

by carrying the Milford Hack Saw Blades. 
We Ship Promptly WRITE FOR PRICES AND CIRCULARS We Ship Promptly 



FROTHINGHAM & WORKMAN, 

WHOLESALE HARDWARE and IRON MERCHANTS Limited 

Montreal, ----- Canada 





HARDWARE AND METAL 




No. 55 



BED ROCK" No. 607 




No. 20. 



No. 7. 



JStmtto) / TW& 



No. 15J 




CORRUGATED BOTTOM. 




No 60. 




No. 90. 



WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS 



The best that money 
can buy. Skilled 
Mechanics will 
accept no other make 
as substitute. New 
improvements have 
made Stanley Planes 
better than ever. 

Our stock consists of 
these new goods only, 
so that all orders 
through us will be 
filled with the most 
recent production of 
the factory. 

Full assortment 
shown in our cata- 
logue. 



$mMl&mrm&i& 



MONTREAL and WINNIPEG 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 



Steel Company of Canada 



Limited 



Bell Brand /fv\ Horseshoes 



^TRADE f ■ ^ 1 MARK 




REGISTERED 



Accurate Grease, Exact Punching, Correct 

and Uniform Shape. 

Horse Nails Wire Nails 

Bar Iron Bar Steel 

Bolts and Nuts, Screws, Tacks, Bright Wire Goods, 
Wrought Pipe, Iron and Steel Wire, Field Fencing. 

District Sales Offices: 

Hamilton Toronto Montreal Winnipeg 

W. A. MacLennan, Vancouver, B C. H. G. Rogers, St. John, N.B. 

J. B. H. Rickaby, Victoria, B.C. Geo. D. Hatfield, Halifax, N.S. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Send Us Your 



Orders 




and note the facility with which we get goods to 
you. The success of this business is based on the 
absolute reliability of everything we send out and 
the promptness with which we make shipments. 

We aim to answer all correspondence promptly 
and to anticipate to the fullest extent the require- 
ments of customers. Rush orders our specialty. 

H. S. Howland, Sons & Co., Limited 

Wholesale Hardware 

WE SHIP PROMPTLY TORONTO OUR PRICES ARE RIGH T 

GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




BUTTS 



AND 



HINGES 



Our Brand guarantees the 
quality and your protection. 

The demand is such that we 
are constantly asked 

How many can you deliver us ? 

Do you not sell them ? 

Perhaps that is what is wrong 
with your hinge trade. 



CANADA STEEL GOODS CO., Limited 



HAMILTON 



MANUFACTURERS 



CANADA 



— Educate the Public to Better Sanitary Arrangements — 

by showing them a full line of 

P A PR Arc fAlMQ WITH GALVANIZED STEEL BODIES 
VI A IV D A VI Ei LAllU AND SEAMLESS COVERS 

Designed and Constructed to Give the Greatest Amount 
of Strength at Points of Greatest Strain 





2 sizes, with Wood Side Protectors 
Nos. 400 500 

Dimensions inches 17x25"; 18x36 
3 Sizes, without Wood Side Protectors 

Nos. 30 40 50 

Inches 14x21 17x25% 18x36 



THE ••ARROW" CAN 





No. 

Inches 



Two Sizes 

1 2 

15x24 17x24 



With or without covers 



THE ••REGULATION" 

One Size Only 
No. 4, inches 14^x20^ 
With six wood side protectors 



Thres Site 
No 1 2 3 

Inches 12'.- xl.V, 14x15 15x17 
Supplied with bail and back handles 



These cans are heavily galvanized inside and out after parts are assembled and made up. This is a very important feature 

as it prevents rust and corrosion from eating out the bottoms. 

FULL DESCRIPTIVE CIRCULAR AND PRICES FURNISHED ON APPLICATION 

THE THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. COMPANY, LIMITED 



MONTREAL AND WINNIPEG 

8 . 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



DISSTON 




INSULATE SCREW DRIVER 

This tool is designed expressly for Electricians' use. The blade of crucible steel, 
hardened and tempered, is embedded in a handle of hard rubber of a texture that 
eliminates brittleness. It WILL NOT work loose. The rubber handle is milled 
grip, with projecting rings which prevent the hands from slipping down on to the 
blade. The hard rubber handle acts as insulation. 

The Disston Insulate Screw Driver is something new. Most 
practical Electricians' screw driver ever made. 

Henry Disston & Sons 

INCORPORATED 

Keystone Saw, Tool, Steel and File Works, - - PHILADELPHIA, PA. 

Canadian Works— Fraser Avenue, Toronto, Ont. 




The quality of Spoons, Forks and Knives, in fact all Silverware manufactured by 

The Toronto Silver Plate Company, Limited 

stamped with their name, is absolutely guaranteed as to quality. The Toronto Silver 
Plate Co., Limited, are a perfectly independent company. Not in the trust, or mem- 
bers of any silverware association or combine. In buying silverware from your 
jobber insist on it being stamped in this way. 

FACTORIES AND SALESROOMS, WEST KING ST., TORONTO 

E. G. GOODERHAM, President 

9 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Note the 8 Large Links 
For 
Adjustment 



i0 ONEIQA 



Each Tie Adaptable 

For Bull, Cow 

or Calf 



THE 

STANDARD CANADIAN 

COW TIE 

(NIAGARA PATTERN) 

MADE ONLY BY THE 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd. 

NIAGARA FALLS, 
ONTARIO. 






When the BEST costs no more, 
Can YOU afford to give your Customers 
an inferior Cow Tie ? 

Compare the "NIAGARA" Cow 
tie with others. It is 10 to 
20% stronger, it has EIGHT 
ADJUSTMENT LINKS — 
others have four — making 
it unnecessary for the dealer 
to carry so many sizes. 



EVERY 
LINK 

formed on the 
principle of the 

Square Knot 

making the 

STRONGEST 

CHAIN 

EVER 

PRODUCED 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Ltd. 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



10 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





THE "BAILEY" WOOD PLANE has the same adjustment of cutter as the celebrated "BAILEY" 
IRON PLANE— differing only in detail where the extra thickness of the Wood Bottom has 
to be taken into consideration. 

The Bottom is made from selected and well-seasoned beech. 

The name "BAILEY" and the number are cast on every Plane, and the name "STANLEY" is 
stamped on every cutter. 

INSIST that your orders be filled with Planes made by THE STANLEY RULE & LEVEL 
COMPANY, which carry with them a GUARANTEE backed by a Company that has been manu- 
facturing Carpenters' and Mechanics' Tools for over half a century. 

"BAILEY" WOOD and IRON PLANES, •'BAILEY" BLOCK PLANES 
"STANLEY" BIT BRACES, SPOKES HAVES and POCKET LEVELS are now 

MADE IN CANADA 

Address all communications to : 



4 



STANDARD 

THE WORLD 

OVEFL 



New Britain. Conn. U.S.A. 



EVERY 

TOOL 

GUARANTEED 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



TRANSPAROL 

Transparol is the finish that makes every surface a mirror, and is the leading 
finish for railroad cars, automobiles, and all other vehicles, also for leather. 

Transparol is a particularly choice finish, and one that is positively indifferent 
to all effects of 

Atmosphere 

Acids 

Oils 

Gasoline 

Salt Water, etc. 

Transparol is the best preservative of wood known, and is equally as good a 
preventative of rust and corrosion of metals. 

The gloss finish given a surface by an application of Transparol is so great that 
Transparol is the wonder of the paint and varnish experts. 

Transparol comprises the following universal qualities :— '. . 



Flexibility 
Elasticity and 
Durability 



History records that in Egypt they had a fluid which resisted the atmosphere for 
ages, and which modern civilization up to date has never been able to produce. 
THE OLD EGYPTIAN PRESERVATIVE HAS BEEN RE-DISCOVERED. 

Transparol stands alone among the multitude of paints, varnishes and shellac 
products like the pyramid amidst the ruins of Old Egypt. 

Transparol is indestructible ; and when all other products have worn away, 
Transparol will still be there. 

Transparol is sold on a guarantee to be satisfactory. 

For Exterior and interior Use 

AMERICAN TRANSPAROL CO. 

50 Church Street, New York 

LIVE AGENTS WRITE FOR TERRITORY 



12 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Economy, Cleanliness and Safety 



are the Three Essential Features of our 



Automatic Paint Brush 



40 per cent. LABOR SAVED 
20 per cent. PAINT SAVED 



It is adapted for use 
with all PAINTS and 
VARNISHES. 

It can be operated by 

gravity or 

AIR PRESSURE. 

It assures an equal 
flow at all TIMES. 




It absolutely elimin- 
ates dipping and 
dripping and thus 
makes for 

CLEANLINESS. 

It does away with 
the paint can and its 
resultant dangers. 



Bristles are set in metal. Remember the name 

"METALSET" 



For further particulars and descriptive pamphlet, address 






Standard Automatic Manufacturing Co. 

50 CHURCH STREET NEW YORK CITY 



13 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



K €VFReD £ 



MANUFACTORY: 

Surrey Works, Smethwick, near Birmingham, England 

SHOWROOMS : 

27-35 Drury Lane, London, W.C. 



Actual manufacturers of every description of 

Brass Fittings for 

Domestic Furnishing and Lighting 

Metallic Bedsteads, Cots, Wire 

Mattresses. 

Brass and Copper and Brass Cased 

Tubes. 

Rolled Brass and Copper. 

Switch Gear. 

CANADIAN REPRESENTATIVE:. 

Geo. H. Say well - Saskatoon 

And 325 CRAIG WEST, MONTREAL 
Cables and Telegrams : Rosswell, Saskatoon. Telephone, 4317 Saskatoon. 

STOCK ROOMS AT: 

"New American" Hotel, Hamilton, Aug. 7th to 10th. 
and "Tecumseh" Hotel, London, Aug. 11th to 14th. 



14 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The WISS STEELFORGED PROCESS 
makes WISS SHEARS SUPERIOR 
in SHARPNESS and DURABILITY 




It's a Profit-Producing Policy to Sell Wiss 

Shears and Scissors 

Perhaps you say — as thousands of other clever merchants have said — 

"I don't care a snap about BRANDS. I judge by merit— and not by NAME." 

That's right— DEAD RIGHT— 

And the best of all reasons why you should wantto sell WISS Scissors and Shears. 

We've been producing high grade cutlery since i848. We've got the experience 
— the plant — and the men. It was only natural that "WISS" should perfect 
the celebrated "STEELFORGED" Process — the wonderful welding of a high 
carbon crucible steel cutting edge onto a breakproof frame of forging steel. 

The merchants who buy on a COMPARATIVE MERIT and VALUE BASIS 

are our biggest and most discriminating customers. 

AND THESE MERCHANTS ENJOY THE BEST TRADE— MAKE 
THE MOST PROFIT— AND KEEP THEIR CUSTOMERS. 

Send for free catalog, illustrating 167 patterns and interesting information on 
building up REAL scissors and shear trade. 



J. WISS & SONS CO. 



Newark, N.J. 



Toronto Office: 145 Wellington Street West. 



U.S.A. 



1 '. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




sssssssssssssssssssssssssss^srs^sssg 



/, 



AN HONEST ROPE 





Honesty — trust-worthiness is one of the highest qualities in the 
human character. So it is with any article of merchandise. The 
thing which makes it most valuable is the honest quality which is 
made a part of it by the manufacturer. 

Good, sound raw material and intelligent, honest workmanship, 
not only talked about but actually put into the goods, are what make 
an article trustworthy — desirable. 

In this class for the last eighty-six years has been 

PLYMOUTH ROPE 

1 "The Rope You Can Trust" 

There is pleasure in using an article of this kind — there is satis- 
faction in selling it. Are you getting some of this satisfaction ? 

Our well distributed stocks and the readiness with which your 
jobber can get his supply of PLYMOUTH rope make the filling of 
your orders easy and prompt. 

Tell your Jobber to send you PL Y MOUTH next time. 



INDEPENDENT CORDAGE CO., LTD. 



Canadian Sales Agents 
55 COLBORNE STREET. TORONTO. ONTARIO 



Slocks at 



TORONTO 
ST. JOHN 



MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 



HALIFAX 
VANCOUVER 



;sssggg?^g^5^^ 




16 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




km 



■f 





TEHHfS 



ALL SILVER PLATED KNIVES 



Stamped as above are 



G 



R 



Good 





enuine xxogers 

Made and guaranteed by 

The Meriden Britannia Co. 

Largest Silver Plate Manufacturers in the World. 

There are other " Rogers " and various 
makes of silverware which are claimed 
to be " just as good," but, like all imita- 
tions, they lack the beauty and wearing 
qualities identified with the original 
and genuine goods stamped 

1847 ROGERS BR0S.# x s 



TRIPLE 

which are the heaviest triple-plated 
Table Silverware obtainable. 

MERIDEN BRITANNIA CO., 

HAMILTON - - CANADA 



17 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CHESTS OF SILVER 




A CHEST OF SILVER bearing - our well-known trade mark is always 
welcomed with a feeling that it is the best that money can buy. 



We have in press, and will shortly furnish the trade, when asked for, a copy 
of our booklet "Chests of Silver," revised and enlarged. This catalogue 
will illustrate our complete lines of Chests and Cabinets for Silverware. 

These Cabinets are becoming" more and more popular. All dealers at 
times, for presentation and wedding gifts, have enquiries for them. Our 
booklet will assist you in making- a sale. In preparing this booklet we 
have used the fewest possible words, and pictures where pictures would 
help. We have made the whole as short, easy and clear as we could. 

1847 ROGERS BROS.® ^ 

This ware is the heaviest Triple-plate procurable, and it affords long ser- 
vice ; hence its popular title 

"Silver Plate That Wears." 

MERIDAN BRITANNIA COMPANY 

HAMILTON, CANADA 



18 



HARDWAKE AND METAL 



SUMMER SPECIALTIES 

Asbestos -Lined Covers 
for Mrs. Potts' Irons 

This cover is made from two separate steel covers with heavy 
asbestos between : made to cover a set of three irons. It is used 
on Gas, Gasolene, Oil or Wood Stoves or Ranges, and will 
save the price of itself in fuel in a very short time. 

Measuring Cups Strainer Funnels 




Marked for Measuring One- 
quarter and One-third 
Cups. 



(Strainer and Funnel Combined) 





GREATLY FACILITATE THE WORK IN THE KITCHEN 



A QUICK FIRE AND A GOOD OVEN 

*"~ That is what 

The " LeRoy " 

means 

And that's what campers and 
summer cottagers require. 
The "LeRoy" is just the 
range for the summer season. 
It has a good oven, therefore 
campers need not do without 
any of the pastry delicacies 
of home. It fires up quickly, 
and cools equally fast when the 
fire is quenched. Can be 
supplied with legs. 

SUGGEST THIS RANGE TO YOUR CUSTOMERS 

McCLARY'S 




Style 9C 



LONDON 
TORONTO 
MONTREAL 



WINNIPEG 
VANCOUVER 
ST. JOHN 



HAMILTON 
CALGARY 
SASKATOON 



19 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The Saskatchewan Glass and Supply Company, Ltd. 

WHOLESALE IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 

Glass and Builders 9 Supplies 



WE CARRY A FULL STOCK OF THE FOLLOWING: 



Polished Plate Glass 
Window and Leaded Glas* 
Fancy and Wired Glass 
Mirrors and Bevelled Plates 
Plasters, Limes and Cements 

No order too large or too small. 



Building and Sheathing Papers Metallic Ceilings and Cornices 

Felt and Asbestos Papers Metallic Shingles and Sidings 

Rubber Roofings and Roofing Papers Sewer Pipe and Tilings 

Nails and Sash Pins Plasterers' Hair, Sash Bars, Brick 

Putty and Glaziers* Points Mantels, Grates and Tile. 



Prompt shipments our specialty. 



Correspondence Solicited. 



P O. BOX 670 



Cor. Manitoba and Sixth Avenue 

MOOSE JAW, SASKATCHEWAN 



TELEPHONE 348 






REGISTERS F~^= 



All Known Sizes, Shapes and Finishes 

The Genuine Convex Reversible 
Wafer works either way, by 
simply changing two screws. 

All Varieties of Registers, 
Faces and Borders supplied 
in any quantity or finish. 



»:§£§:§:•«? 



Convex Reversible Wafer, "Across." 



U~ 



♦^"♦^^ ♦ ♦ in an y quantity or hnish. 

^4 .: Canadian Ferrosteel Co. Br „„& g 



Convex Reversible Wafer, " Upright, 




Look around and see just where Ven- 
tilators could be used advantageously in 
your town. Get the agency for Acorn 
Exhaust Ventilators, and you'll be sur- 
prised at the results. 

With fresh pure air in the factory, em- 
ployees will be able to do better work and 
more of it. The Acorn Exhaust Ventil- 
ator will take care of that. Then, too, 
pure air is more easily heated than foul air. 

Acorn Exhaust Ventilators are de- 
signed on the most improved methods of 
ventilation. Highly recommended by 
builders and contractors, Acorn Exhaust 
Ventilators are newest and best. For fac- 
tories, churches, etc., they are unequalled. 

Give this suggestion a trial. When 
you decide to do so, just write us and we 
will furnish you with full details. 




-The 

Metal 
Shingle 6& 
Siding Co., 

Limited 

Factories : 
Preston, Ont. 
Montreal, Que. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



You can well believe the good reports of the 

"GOOD CHEER" 

WARM AIR FURNACE 

(The Circle Waterpan Furnace) 



For, to tell the truth, the results 
of the combination of the "Good 
Cheer" and our now famous Circle 
Waterpan have far exceeded even 
our own expectations. We knew 
that we were on the right road to 
the accomplishment of a more health- 
ful and comfortable heat, but such a 
complete revolution in heating 
methods as has resulted through it 
was more than we looked for. 




In comparison, ordinary furnace heat can only be classed 
as crude. Humidity is an essential, and the Circle Water- 
pan alone gives desired results. Beware of humidity 
claims based on makeshift contrivances. Good Cheer 
warmth is ideal and people are willing to pay the price 
for heat of this kind. 

There's profit in this class of furnace work. 

The James Stewart Manufacturing Co., Limited 

WOODSTOCK, - ONTARIO 

WESTERN WAREHOUSE— 156 LOMBARD ST., WINNIPEG, MAN. 



Distributing Agencies: 

McLennan, McFeely & Co., 
Vancouver, B.C. 



Wood, Vallance Hardware Co., 
Nelson, B.C. 



Ross Bros., Limited, 
Edmonton, Alta. 



21 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Jewel Stoves and Ranges 

Royal Jewel Steel Range 

The Range of Quality. 

lively modern improvement is embodied in the Royal Jewel 
Range. 

Six sizes are made, namely: Nos. 816, 916, 818, 918, 920 and 
922, with or without Reservoir, and with any equipment of 
shelves or closets required. 

Either Encased Reservoir (as cut) or Contact Reservoir on 
left end can be supplied. 

The great variety of sizes and styles enables 
the dealer to satisfy all demands. 

The Royal Jewel is very attractive in appear- 
ance and easy to sell. When once sold it 
never comes back, but is always a working 
advertisement. One sale makes another and 
the demand is constantly increasing. 

Hake the Royal Jewel Steel 

Range your leader and yon are 

sure of the best stove trade in 

your locality. 

In addition to the Royal Jewel, we make 
cheaper Steel Ranges to suit all buyers; such 
as Electric Jewel, Arctic Jewel, Gypsy 
STYLE R.F. Jewel. 

We also make a great variety of Cast Iron Ranges and Cooking Stoves, including 
the Dominion Jewel Range, Sterling Jewel Range, Grand Jewel Range, Home Jewel 
and many others. The Grand Jewel Wood Cook Stove is known and appreciated 
wherever wood can be secured for fuel. 

We make many different kinds of Heating Stoves to suit all sections of the country, 
including our Ideal Jewel and Modern Jewel Base Burners, Grand Jewels, Jewel Oaks, 
Fire Kings, Jewel Triple Heaters, etc. 





The Burrow, Stewart & Milne Co., Ltd. 

Head Office and Factory at HAMILTON 
Offices also at Montreal, Toronto, and Winnipeg. 

Western Customers please write for imformation and send orders to our Winnipeg 

Branch, No. 130 James Avenue. 



22 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Steel Sheets for Deep Stamp- 
ing and Enamelling Purposes 

"Comet" Brand 

Also Dark Blue, P.C.R. and C.A. 

Sheets, also Galvanized Canada 

Plates. 

Makers 

W. Gilbertson & Co., Limited 

Sole Canadia n Sales gent 

ALEXANDER GIBB 

13 St. John Street - Montreal 



Jardine Universal Ratchet 
Clamp Drill 

Used In factories of all kinds for 
harried machine repalri. 

All machine shops and railway 
shops should have it. 

Bridge builders, track layers, 
and structural metal workers 
haye constant use for It. 

Send for Description. 

A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

HESPELER - ONTARIO 



is a line that never varies in quality. 
The consignments you receive from 
time to time are the same through 
and through — absolutely reliable in 
toughness, strength and workability. 
Economical and correct methods of 
production mean that you get a flaw- 
less product at the lowest prices. 

London Rolling Mill Co., Ltd. 

LONDON, CANADA 

Sales Agents, Ontario: Baines & Peckover, Toronto 
Manitoba: Bissett & Loucks, Limited, Winnipeg 



Willi...... 




-...,,111111) 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 

Have been the Standard for over seventy years. 

•0"»L1TY 1'NOUFSTIONEO" 

Each pair of our shears bears the above trade mark. 



iEYMOUl 

SHEAR CO. 




Complete Line T R I M M ERS', B AN K E R : 
BARBERS' and TAILORS' SHEARS, etc., etc. 

HENRY T. SEYMOUR SHEAR COMPANY 



Three 
One 



We have just 
issued under one 
cover new booklet 
containing 

First 

illustrations. 

Second 

descriptive matter. 

Third 

list prices of our 
complete line of 

Furnaces and 
Furnace Materials 

and 

Boilers and 
Boiler Materials 

Copies have 
already been 
mailed to our 
numerous customers 
in Ontario. 
Possibly some 
have been overlooked. 
Have you received 
a copy ? 

If not, communicate 
with us to-day. 

Pease Foundry Company 



UMITED- 



Toronto, 



Canada 



Pease Waldon Company 

LIMITED 



Winnipeg, 



Canada 



We manufacture and stock 
all materials required in con- 
nection with Warm Air, Hot 
Water and Steam Heating 
Installations. 



WiEBUSCH & HIL6ER. LIMITED, NEW YORK, Agents 
23 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE 

Empire King 

FURNACE 



has all the latest improvements 
found on our more expensive 
furnace, but is sold at a lower 
price. The simplicity in con- 
struction and the quick heating 
ability of the "KING" furnace, go 
to make it the most durable, effi- 
cient, and the best furnace at the 
price on the market. 

Write us for ca talogue Jand price 
list of this reliable and quick seller. 

WRITE US DIRECT OR 
ANY OF OUR AGENCIES 




The Canadian Heating 
and Ventilating Co., Limited 

OWEN SOUND, ONT. 



The Christie Bros. Co., Ltd. 

802 College Street 

TORONTO 



The Christie Bros. Co., Ltd, 

Cor. Park and Henry Sts. 

WINNIPEG 



The Atkins Company 
VANCOUVER 



GREENING'S 

COW TIES 




MADE IN SIX DIFFERENT 
STYLES, VIZ: 

Open Ring, Closed Ring, Small 
Closed Ring, Three Chain, Four 
Chain, Greening's Special 

These are standard goods made of 
Greening's Steel Chain, without a weak 
spot, and all fittings of proportionate 
strength. They are incomparable in 
lightness, strength and appearance. 

WRITE US FOR TRADE PRICES 

The B. Greening Wire Co., Ltd. 



HAMILTON 



MONTREAL 



24 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



METALLIC CEILINGS 

" Boost Them, Mr. Hardware Man, Boost Them.*' 



" Metallic " has talking 
points over every other interior 
finish. If you don't know them, 
ask us. 

Wood, paper, plaster and 
burlap will fade away before 
the "Metallic" booster. 

Metallic Ceilings carry 
three separate profits — 
on the sale of the goods, on 
the erection and on the paint 
to recoat them. 

Get in touch with us to-day. 




The dealer who is boosting 
OUR Ceilings is always on top. 
He can do a better job and do 
it quicker than the other fellow. 

WHY? 

Because he's got the goods 

to work with. 
Properly made stock. Re- 
squared after stamping. Goes 
a long way towards making 
success of the ceiling business. 
We have that kind. 

Catalogue and Samples on Request. 



THE METALLIC ROOFING CO. OF CANADA, Limited 



TORONTO, ONT. 



MANUFACTURERS 



J 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

(21) 



The "CANADIAN HOWARD" 
Double Radiator FURNACE 

>"pO the making of the "'CANADIAN HOWARD" have gone the best of materials 
•"■ and the work of the most skilled mechanics, makingit a perfectly constructed 
warm air furnace which you will find absolutely reliable. It has an enormous 
radiating surface. Economy in fuel is gained by passing the gases of combustion 
through two radiators and taking from them all the heat otherwise allowed to 
escape by the chimney. 

Let us have your inquiry. It will pay you. 

The C. NORSWORTHY CO., Ltd., St. Thomas, Ont. 






1 \ m n n \j a 

'•HI 


"GOOD CHEER" Sidewall Registers 




A line in four sizes, of uniform design throughout. Neat and tasteful pattern, and 
supplied in black Japan, ordinary oxidized or full oxidized finish, with enamelled green 
fan. Our ordinary oxidized will about equal the more expensive full oxidized finish 
of other makes. 

Positive acting fan — stays exactly where set, and when closed locks tight. No 
springs, etc., to weaken or loosen. 

The price? It will pay you to Inquire. 

A full line of the above carried by The Jas. Stewart Mfg. Co., Limited, Winnipeg, Man. 

The Jas. Stewart Manufacturing Co., Ltd. 








^^^^^^^ 


Woodstock, Ontario 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




NEW 
CATALOG 

POCKET EDITION 

Have you received copies of this ? 

To all dealers carrying our tools we are 
glad to furnish them FREE for distribution to 
tool customers 

The POCKET EDITION is 5 1/2 by 3 3/4 
inches and contains 304 pages. 

Better ask us about them. 

GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY 



These Catalogs 
help sell -tools 



GREENFIELD, 



MASS., U.S.A. 



A 

$5.00 

Safety Razor 

that yo u ca n 

Sell Profitably 

at 

$2.50 



THE YANKEE 

'Made in England' 




$18.00 

Per Dozen 
Delivered. 

It's the most 
compact pocket 
edition of a 
case that you 
ever laid eyes 
on. 



The entire effect and intrinsic value easily proves a Superior $5.00 standard. 

INTERNATIONAL DISTRIBUTING COMPANY, Montreal, Canada 

26 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Copp's Stoves 
and Ranges 

SILVER QUEEN 




Our new medium 
priced up-to-date 
Range. 

It will pay you to 
investigatehs 
merits. 



"The Western Stove Makere'" 

Fort William, Winnipeg. Vancouver. 




THE STRATFORD SWING 

Is made from good, well-seasoned lumber, stands eight 
feet high and is strongly nailed and bolted. The footrest 
can be placed level with the seat, thus forming a bed or 
hammock. Body finished in vermilion and swinging 
part is natural wood well varnished. 

This is a profitable line for you to handle — a line that 
is guaranteed to give satisfactory and reliable service. 



Write for catalogue and prloes- 
will Interest you. 



•they * 



THE STRATFORD MFG. CO., Limited 

STRATFORD, ONTARIO 

Manufacturers of Ladders and Lawn Swings, etc. 




Attractive, Convenient, Durable, Reasonable in Price. 



Our Patented Metal Shelf Boxes will Improve the appearance of 
your store, and will enable you to give your customers quicker 
and more efficient service. 

Advise us space you have available for shelf boxes and shelving 



and we will sketch out plan and give you our best price for 

same. 

Send for illustrated catalogue. It will interest you. 

Cameron and Campbell, - Toronto 




GROW, DEALERS! SPREAD OUT! 

Put yourself in a position to take any kind of a roofing 
contract. With 



_l AAA. A 



"CROWN" 



PATENT 
STEEL 



SHINGLES 



you have a better proposition than the slater can possibly 
offer. Get some (or all) of that business you've had to 
lose to him for so long. Get started to-day — right now, 
by writing for our catalogue and price lists. At the same time we'll send you our samples, 

charges prepaid. Write at once to 

McFARLANE & DOUGLAS, Limited, 2so-2go siater street, Ottawa, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Steel Rules, Gauges, 

Etc. 



GHESTERMAN'S 




MEASURING TAPES 



TRADE 




J c 



Linen and 
Steel 

MARKS 



coggM TREMBLE 



lfflfflnilUim^p|lljllMpjMp[lllip|llMlllUllllll^imiMp|l 



^iTTiiTiTtTdTiTiiiffTTrrtiTlYiti-rrrT 



Engineers' Small 
Tools 



ForlPrices, Catalogues, etc., apply to 

F. H. SCOTT; 133 Coristine Bldg., Montreal 




Steel Pocket Rule 




Up-To-Date Package Carriers 

Our package carriers are of simple construction and in case 
of disarrangement of any part do not require a mechanic to 
repair them. 

They are well and strongly made throughout, and as the 
weight and strain are divided between two wires there is less 
liability to breakage of the wires than with any of the single 
wire systems. 

The illustration shows the neatness and compactness of 
the device. It occupies a smaller space and obstructs the view 
less than any other system. 

A SUPERIOR ADVANTAGE. 

This carrier works more rapidly as well as more smooth- 
fy than any other. Send for 

The Hamilton Brass Mfg. Company, Ltd. ZTtll 

Hamilton, Ontario, and Montreal, P.Q. 




TINSMITHS' HELPER AND PATTERN BOOKS 

A useful handbook for Tinners and Sheet Metal 
Workers. It treats the simpler problems in pattern 
cutting occurring daily in the shop besides giving tables 
and information constantly needed by the mechanic. 
Section 1— DIAGRAMS and PATTERNS. Demonstrates 
50 examples of pattern work, such as cutting flared tin- 
ware, elbow patterns, etc. 

Section 2— EPITOME OF MENSURATION. Describes 
how to find the area and circumference of a circle, con- 
tents of a sphere, etc. 

Section 3— TABLES, RULES and RECIPES. Gives the 
weights of sheet metals, capacity of cans, recipes for 
mixing solders, cements, etc. 

Price $1. 63 Figures 

Mac Lean Publishing Company 

Technical Book Dept. 143-149 University Ave., Toronto, Can. 




- THE WANT AD. - 

The want ad. has grown from a 
little used force in business life, 
into one of the great necessities 
of the present day. 

Business men nowadays turn to 
the "want ad" as a matter of 
course for a hundred small ser- 
vices. 

The want ad. gets work for 
workers and workers for work. 

It gets clerks for employers and 
finds employers for clerks. It 
brings together buyer and seller, 
and enables them to do business 
though they may be thousands of 
miles apart. 

The "want ad." is the great 
force in the small affairs and inci- 
dents of daily life. 



28 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




IS THE ONLT GUNMAKER 

Seems a "tall" statement, doesn't it? Yet it's merely an extract from one of the many thousands of 
similar letters received from customers all over the world. Here's what our customer says: "I cannot 
thank you enough for my new gun; it is a jewel; I would not take $500.00 for it. Hurrah for W. W. 
Greener! He certainly is the only Gunmaker. " Now don't you think it's worth while having customers 
like this? Our motto is "a contented client is a continual customer." You try it, handle Greener guns 
in your store, and they cannot fail to attract attention. The name has always heen a business bringer. 
Used in conjunction with your own, it's going to bring you business 

The outstanding superiority of the Greener gun is based upon nearly a century's experience in Gunmak- 
ing. It is made in the largest and most complete sporting gun factory in the world, under the direct 
supervision of Expert Gunmakers, who have shot game in every clime and know the sportsman's actual 
requirements. The result is that the winning gun in public trials and exhibition has been so frequently a 
Greener as to constitute a record never likely to be equalled by any manufacturer or combination of manu- 
facturers, British or foreign. 

Now send a postal for catalog and descriptive booklet of Greener's "Empire Gun." 



W. W. GREENER, 



63 and 65 Beaver Hall Hill 
Montreal, P.Q. Works: Birmingham, Eng. 




»■ ""'" 




Special Steel-Special Methods 

and Long Years of Experience 

are the reasons why the files produced by the Nicholson File Co. are well 
known everywhere as the standard of file quality. These are the well- 
known factory brands made by the Nicholson File Company in Canada : 

AMERICAN ARCADE GREAT WESTERN GLORE 

EAGLE McLELLAN KEARNEY & FOOT J. 0. SMITH 

Sell these and you sell the best 



Nicholson File Co., 



(DOMINION WORKS) 



Port Hope, Ont, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ASK US WHY 

If you want to know more about "STANDARD" 

■ DOUBLE ACTING 

I I % SPRING FLOOR 





DITMMA1U UQM UHX 



] AUlU«Ult4tKUI4 



HINGES, let us tell you a few dealers, the LARGEST 
and BEST, who believe in keeping UP-TO-DATE and 
are pushing the "STANDARD" line. 

THE STANDARD MFG. CO., Shelby, Ohio, U.S.A. 



EAVETROUGH and 

CONDUCTOR 

PIPE THAT DO 

NOT FIT 

TOGETHER 

EASILY ARE 

DEAR AT ANY 

PRICE. 




Ours are noted for their uniformity and the ease with which they 
can be put up on the job. Other well-known lines of ours are 
Ventilators, Skylights, Ridge Roll, Valleys, Elbows and 

CORRUGATED IRON 




WHEN IN A HURRY 
ORDER FROM US 

Wheeler 
& Bain 

THE OUICK SHIPPERS 

Toronto, Canada. 





Castellated Nuts 

A. L. A. M. Standard made and carried in stock at Montreal Plant are the 
kind which hundreds of automobile and other makers of fine machinery are 
using in large quantities. 

You can get them in all the popular sizes. Specify soft or Case-hardened' 
We carry the A.L.A.M. Finished Nuts too, also semi-finished Nuts in " V " thread. 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICES. 



DELIVERIES PROMPT. 




msm 



The National-Acme Manufacturing Company 

MONTREAL, St. Elizabeth St. and G.T.R. NEW YORK, 77 White Street 
BOSTON. 141 Milk Street. CHICAGO, 549 Washington Blvd. 

DETROIT, 1222 Majestic Bldg. ATLANTA, Candler Bldg. 

WAREHOUSES-New York. 77 White St.: Chicago, 549 Washington Blvd. 
PLANTS -Cleveland, Ohio, Montreal. Canada. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



For a quick seller— 




STILL* 


S 


EXTRA 




AXE HANDLES 


Beat them all. 




You certainly are losing 


Trade 


if you do not stock them. 




DO* NOT DELAY but get a 


stock 


at once. For the Price, yoi. 


l can- 


not surpass them in Quality or ] 


finish. 


Write for Prices. 




J. H. Still Mfg. Co., 


Ltd. 


ST. THOMAS ONTARIO 



WHAT WOMEN 




DEMAND 



How about your kitchen-ware 
department? We have a line 
that will prove to be the most 
popular and most profitable for 
you to handle. Hardwaremen . 
who handle them testify this to 
be a fact. 

Our Guarantee protects you in every 
respect. Do not hesitate— write at once. 




Andrews Wire Works of Canada, Ltd. 

Watford, Ont. Rockford, III. 



i 

"The same old thing in 
the same old way" 

is no policy for the wall 
paper business 

1912 




is 

NEW, NOVEL, ORIGIN A I , 
DIFFERENT 



THIS is why, already, it is selling 
as no line ever sold before in an 
equal length of time after going on 
the market. 

If you miss these papers you miss 
the biggest business-getters ever 
offered you. 

See these wall papers. Study them. 
If ever you could select with a 
good, comfortable, sure-profit-in- 
sight feeling you will say it is now 
after seeing these wall papers. 

If your traveller hasn't reached you 
he will soon. Wait for him. 



STAUNTONS Limited 



WALL PAPER 
Manufacturers 

943 Yonde St., TORONTO 




31 



HARDWARE AND METAL 





Small Costs-Big Results 

THE COST of a Want Ad. in Hardware and 
Metal is estimated in CENTS. 

THE RESULTS are figured in DOLLARS. 



PARKHILL. ONT., 
HARDWARE AND METAL. JAN 31st. 1910 

TORONTO. ONT. 

Gentlemen, — Kindly find enclosed P. O. Order to cover in- 
sertion of advertisement in your paper. Tools were sold three 
days following the first insertion and we are still receiving in- 
quiries from all over Canada. 

Yours very truly. 
THE STEELE HARDWARE STORE. 
Per G. F. Steele. 



EVERY retail hardware dealer, every hardware manufacturer, 
wholesaler, traveller and clerk from VANCOUVER TO 
HALIFAX is a consistent reader of HARDWARE and METAL. 
This makes a Want Ad. in Hardware and Metal the only satisfactory 
way to place your proposition before those most vitally interested. 

WOULD YOU BUY OR SELL— A Typewriter— A Show-case- 
Set of Tinner's Tools — Desk — Secure a Clerk — Bookkeeper — Partner 



Use a Hardware and Metal Want Ad. 



RATES : (Payable in advance) 
2c. per word first insertion, 
lc. per word subsequent insertions. 
5c. extra per insertion for box number if desired. 

Write or phone our nearest office. 




Hardware and Metal 

Montreal - Toronto 
Winnipeg 




HARDWARE AND METAL 




Canadian Leaders in Dry Cells 

COLUMBIA 

There can be only one leader in any given line. That leadership must 
be obtained and recognized on account of superior qualities proven in 
service. 

On this basis Columbia has won the distinction of having the longest 
life, being the lowest in cost in the end, and giving the maximum of 
good service. 

It is made of tested material, and only skilled men and highly special- 
ized machinery put the ingredients together. 

To make Columbia of greatest service to our customers we have made 
it from two formulas that produce somewhat different results. 
COLUMBIA is a light drain cell for all forms of intermittent work — 
bells, telephones, signals, self winding clocks, electrical toys, wireless 

telegraph outfits, and numerous other things 

Its chief qualities are long shelf life, uniformity of service, and low cost when compared with the length of 

its life. 

COLUMBIA IGNITOR is somewhat different. It is a strong current, quick recuperating cell for all forms 

of motor ignition — automobiles, motor boats, gas and gasoline engines, motor cycles, aeroplanes. 

When once used these will be always used. For sale by all electrical dealers. 

Address H.M.— 11 

Canadian National Carbon Co., Ltd. - Toronto, Ont. 

NOTE — Our New Factory at Toronto is thoroughly prepared to make quick shipments 
of fresh cells in any quantity. 



WIRE BALE TIES 



Other Specialties we 
make are 

Annealed Wire 

specially soft 
and pliable. 

WIRE NAILS 

Perfect heads 
and points. 
Full weight 



For Baling Hay, our Wire, made, 
all the time, from the finest qual- 
ity Bessemer Rods, will give the 

most complete satisfaction. It will be found at least 10 per cent. 

stronger than any other Baling Wire on the market. Better send 

along an order. There is real satisfaction and profit in handling 

this well-known line. Get our prices. 

THE LAIDLAW BALE -TIE CO., Limited, Hamilton, Ontario 

GEO. W. LAIDLAW, Vancouver. B.C. HARRY F. MOULDEN. Winnipeg. Man. 



ii 



Safelock" Stays cannot Slip 



This is a mighty strong selling point. It means that the fence will stand up to the hardest usage from animals 
or the elements and still keep its height and shape unimpaired. And the fact that the strand wires do not have 
to be kinked, owing to the positive permanent grip of the lock, means that every wire will stand its full strain. 
The "Safelock" is absolutely the strongest wire fence made— you can sell it as such and the test of time will 
bear you out to the letter. There's good money in handling " SAFELOCK. " Write us about the exclusive 
agency for your locality. Don't put it off— Write to-day. 



The Owen Sound Wire Fence 

Western Agents: THE BRANDON 




^ Company, Ltd., Owen Sound, Ont. 

SAFELOCK FENCE CO., Brandon, Man. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 






DOMINION 

GUARANTEED 

AMMUNITION 

You take no chances in buying GUARANTEED AMMUNI- 
TION when backed by a responsible manufacturer. 
You buy with a certainty of quality. 
You sell with assurance of satisfying your customer. 
MADE IN CANADA 
Means fresh stock, owing to the proximity of the market. Hand- 
somely lithographed labeled boxes give an attractive appearance 
to your shelves. Use our guarantee and make 
QUICK ** u* PROFITABLE J* J* SALES 

DOMINION CARTRIDGE CO., LIMITED 

MONTREAL CANADA 



A-'S^vf ppr.T<?TFRFn Iv'-T-y-.;- _ _ __ _ . :,,?. ; r 



S^l 



S 



£s&?£ ;■ 






HRSScC? 

TRADE MARK 



■ji rtrx 



.*.•■ 



- i» ,■.-'.- I I I ifl I "II- I' II *l I- I' I — 



..v-'.-.-t.: 
X -■:,■: 



S3""- 

$p~ 



Se 



Order Early for Fall Shipment. 

We can supply everything in 

HARDWARE and METALS 

Tin, Canada Plates, Pig and Bar Iron, 
Anchors, Chain, etc. 



■■&< ■■■■*.■ 

mi 
m 



Henry Rogers, Sons & Co., Limited 

(ESTABLISHED OVER A CENTURY) 

WOLVERHAMPTON A SHEFFIELD 



Canadian Branch: 



6 St. Sacrament St. 



Montreal. 



-. •'•1'+' 



•«£**' 



:<■ 









sn^Wi 



34 



Parcels Post Legislation May be Introduced Again 

Revival of Question is Foreshadowed in the House of Commons hy Posjtmaster- 
General — Official of Department is Now Investigating — • Merchants Should 
Lodge an Immediate Protest — Quick Action Needed. 



The proposal to establish a parcels 
post system in Canada has again been 
revived. In answer to a question in the 
House of Commons on Friday, July 21, 
Postmaster-General Lemieux stated that 
he had been giving a great deal of at- 
tention to the matter, and that he had 
an official of the department investigat- 
ing the problems of cost and rates. A 
report was expected soon. 

A brief summary of the discussion 
on the question will be of interest. The 
man who started the debate was W. F. 
MacLean, M.P., the sponsor of public 
ownership of the telegraph and cable 
services. In dealing with this oft-moot- 
ed problem, Mr. MacLean branched off 
onto parcels post, and demanded to know 
what was being done. "We don't want 
promises, we want performance," he is 
reported to have said. 

In reply, the Hon. Mr. Lemieux stated 
that an investigation was being conduct- 
ed by Geo. Ross of the post office depart- 
ment. The first thing that would have 
to be done would be to fix a standard 
railway mail subsidy rate. The rail- 
ways were already asking for higher 
subsidies, the present rate being four 
cents on baggage cars and eight cents 
on mail cars. Mr. Ross' report would 
probably be submitted shortly. 

Mr. Lemieux touched briefly on the 
opposition which had been stirred up 
by his previous attempt to enact parcels 
post legislation, and which finally result- 
ed in his withdrawing that measure. The 
department had been flooded for months 
with petitions from farmers and store- 
keepers opposing the proposal. 

Mr. Lemieux added that a good begin- 
ning had been made in the free rural 
mail delivery system, which was now. on 
a fair way to success. One hundred 
thousand boxes were now being inanu- 
factured in Toronto. 

F. R. Lawlor, of Haldimand, asked 
what weight would probably be carried 
under a parcel post system. 

Mr. Lemieux replied that the weight 
would probably be the same as in Eng- 
land. 

It is reported that a number of others 
spoke to the question, some criticizing 
and some favoring the proposal. 

Issue Must he Watched. 
From this it will be seen that, while 
there has been nothing actually decided 
upon, the department is preparing in- 



formation with a view to action later 
on. It will probably depend on the 
nature of the report submitted whether 
or not the measure is again introduced 
and there is not at the present time, 
therefore, any certainty that further ac- 
tion will result. 

While retail dealers — who would be 
the chief sufferers — need not feel any 
undue sense of alarm, they must face 
the possibility of the re-introduction of 
the measure and prepare to meet it. 
This can best be done by writing at once 
to the member for their constituency, 



FIGHT ON IN STATES. 

Washington, D.C., July 21 — 
The legislative battle over the 
Parcels Post proposals in Con- 
gress is now impending and the 
opposing factions may clash at 
any moment. The advocates of 
the measure believe that they see 
an opportunity now to win a 
foothold but the opposition is 
better organized and more confi- 
dent of success than ever. 

While the subject of Parcels 
Post legislation is not included 
as a part of the program of leg- 
islation of the House for this 
session, there have been intro- 
duced in the House since the ses- 
sion began 11 measures providing 
for the establishment of the sys- 
tem. All of these bills are de- 
signed to have the Parcels Post 
established by. degrees, to have it 
started and tried out on rural 
routes. Only one of the 11 bills 
provides for a general Parcels 
Post, with a limit of 11 pounds 
to the package. This bill is 
fathered by Representative Sulz- 
er, of New York, one of the lead- 
ing advocates of the Parcels Post 
legislation. 



outlining what the passage of a Parcels 
Post measure would mean and enlisting 
his services, in case the matter comes up 
in the House. Unless the members are 
shown how pernicious and how disturb- 
ing to legitimate trade the measure 
would prove, they might let themselves 
be carried away by the arguments of 
those who support the measure and ac- 
35 



cord a half indifferent support. It is 
important, therefore, that each member 
should be supplied with the facts before 
anything comes before the House; it 
might be too late if left until afterward. 

It may be that nothing further will be 
heard of the matter. All who have the 
best interests of the people at large at 
heart will sincerely hope so. It will not 
do, however, to rest easy in the trust 
that nothing will come of the investi- 
gation now being held. The statement 
of the Postmaster-General contains in it- 
self sufficient room for alarm and should 
serve to spur merchants in all parts of 
the country into immediate activity. An 
ounce of prevention is worth a pound of 
cure. A word of protest now might 
have infinitely more influence than unit- 
ed opposition later on. 

It is not necessary here to restate 
the case against Parcels Post. The ar- 
guments have been voiced often before 
and every dealer knows enough of the 
probable consequences from the experi- 
ence he has already had with mail order 
competition, to make out a strong case 
against any measure which would so 
materially stimulate catalogue buying. 
The best word of advice which can now 
be given is: Make use of that knowledge 
without delay. 



NEW WATERWORKS PLANTS. 

The town council of Dresden, has in- 
structed F. W. Farncomb, C.E., of Lon- 
don, to prepare plans and specifica- 
tions for a waterworks system. It is 
announced that approximately 15,000 
feet of mains will be laid, and the 
pumps ready for operation by Oct. 1, 
deep wells being sunk as a source of 
supply. 

West Lome village council has passed 
a by-law to spend $11,000, for a water- 
works system for fire protection pur- 
poses. Steam will be used for pumping 
purposes at the outset, the intention 
being to change to hydro-electric power 
should the latter become available. 



SAFETY DEVICES. 

The Norton Co., Worcester, Mass., 
have issued an interesting booklet, illus- 
trating and describing modern safety de- 
vices that can be applied in the use of 
grinding wheels and machines. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Preparing for the Fall Trade in Sporting Goods 

Dealers Should Take an Inventory of all Rifles and Ammuni- 
tion in Stock — Early Ordering is Advisable — Should Dealers 
Stick Entirely to High Price Goods? 



With the lirst daj of A.ugusi only a 
few hours away, an inventory should be 

taken of the gWlS and ammunition sec- 
tion of the hardware store. The shoot- 
ing season is still live oi- six weeks in 
the distance, bul the demand for guns 
should he fell in a short time now; in 
fact, the writer has heard of a number 
of good sales of late, showing that the 
open season is not far away. 

One of the lirst things to do is to 
see that the stocks on hand are gone 
over thoroughly and put in good condi- 
tion. They should be free from rust, 
and in all other respects should be pre- 
sentable to a prospective customer. This 
is jnst a preliminary "canter," as the 
sporting columns say, and will provide 
employment for a capable clerk some af- 
ternoon or morning when business is 
quiet. 

Goods Already Ordered. 

The progressive retailer has sent in 
his orders for guns and ammunition 
probably months ago, and very likely, 
too, he has already received his supplies 
or has arranged for them to arrive with- 
in a short time now. But for those who 
are contempating opening a gun depart- 
ment, the present is the time to decide. 
By the middle of next month lovers of 
wild fowl shooting will be completing 
their arrangements for the opening of 
the season, and from that time forward 
through the winter, there are numerous 
opportunities for business. 

The First Stock. 

For the man who is debating with him- 
self as to whether he will carry guns 
or not, the general opinion is that he 
will have to feel around the community 
in which he is located, and let his early 
experienc e build up his policy. R. 
Cagney, with A. E. Bregnet, St. Cath- 
erine street, Montreal, considers that any 
first step must depend upon the circum- 
stances under which it is made. In any 
case, it is preferable to begin moderate- 
ly. Find out what the people want, and 
then go ahead. In some places the field 
may be excellent, in others it might be 
extremely small. The saving factor is 
the knowledge that in every man there 
is a desire to break things up. if it is 
only hitting a clay bird or putting a 
hole through the black spot on a rail- 
way ci-ossing board. The present gene- 
ration have not the opportunities for 
hunting that their grandfathers enjoyed, 
but there is still a great deal of shooting 
done in the unbroken woods, on the lakes 
and at the less realistic "shoots." 



Opinion is somewhat varied as to 
whether any cheap lines should be car- 
ried. Some think that a few cheap guns 
are necessary, others that it is better 
not to touch them. 

This again is to be decided by the 
individual. One retailer spoke strong- 
ly against a cheap line of guns. He 
did not object to carrying a few shot- 
guns of medium price, but he felt that 
the safest way to build up the trade was 
to endeavor to sell those guns in which 
he had the most faith. However, this is 
a debatable question with some, but the 
trade as a whole feel that most attention 
should be given to the better lines. 

The Kinds of Customers. 

The veteran sportsman generally 
wants a particular make of gun. He has 
handled it probably for years, and he 
has confidence in it. It is admitted that 
it is best to give this customer the guns 
he asks for but there are others, especi- 
ally among the younger set, who are open 
to conviction, as it were. They have 
read about big game in the Rockies, 
New Brunswick and elsewhere. Rail- 
way folders have told them of places 
haunted by the wild duck. They have 
seen advertisements of this gun and 
that. They feel that they would like to 
get into the game, and they go to the 
hardwareman for enlightenment and ad- 
vice as to which is the best to buy. This 
is where the retailer has a chance to 
sell the gun he feeels warrants his con- 
fidence, and where personal salesmanship 
comes in. Another few weeks and Can- 
adian hardwaremen will be presented 
with just such situations. Are they 
going to be prepared for them, and will 
they be equal to the occasions? 



Hardware Letter 
Box 



Locks for Sliding Doors. 

J. M., Toronto.— "Where can I pro- 
cure a lock for sliding barn doors, one 
that will open from the outside? I 
have recommended a padlock to my 
customer, but he wants something that 
will lock the door and which can be 
opened by a key from the outside. Is 
there not something, not too expensive 
suitable for this?" 

Locks of this kind were used some 
years ago but they have gone out of 
use now and are not handled by whole- 
36 



salers to any extent. The custom now 
is to fasten sliding doors with pad- 
locks and latahes. The lock in ques- 
tion was made by Lane Bros., Pough- 
keepsie, N.Y., and they may still be 
manufacturing them. — Editor. 



Boy Scout Outfits. 

Sonner Co., Moncton, N.B.— "What 
companies supply boy scout outfits, in- 
cluding Billy cans?" 

Miller Manufacturing Co., Toronto.— 
Kditor. 

Coopers' Tools. 

J. B. Crawford, Dutton, Ont.— "Who 
are the manufacturers of coopers' 
tools?" 

Can any reader give this informa- 
tion?— Editor. 

P. G. Owen, Strathmore— "Mac" has 
not written anything with reference to 
this subject. Numerous articles have 
appeared on this subject, however. We 
are forwarding back numbers. — Editor. 



Carpet Sweepers. 

Geo. T. Cole, Owen Sound. — "Can you 
inform us what Toronto jobbers handle 
National Carpet Sweepers ?" 

H. S. Rowland, Sons & Co.— Editor. 



Coopers' Tools. 

J. B. Crawford, Dutton, Ont,— "Would 
you please tell us the people who manu- 
facture Coopers' tools." 

Allan Hills Edge & Tool Co., Gait, 
Ontario, Mack & Co., Rochester, and 
Hubbard & Co., Pitsburg.— Editor. 



Printed Price Cards. 

D. W. Douglas, Campbellford, Ont.— 
"Can you inform us of anyone selling 
printed price cards and show cards for 
window displays ?" 

Wm. R. Adams, 4Q1 Yonge St., To- 
ronto, and Barnard Bros., Spadina Ave.,. 
Toronto.— Editor. 



Waste Paper Press. 

A. W. Holliday, Millbrook, Ont.— 
"Where are small waste paper presses 
made and what would the, probable cost 
be?" 

Write Logemann Bros., Co., 292 Ore- 
gon Street, Milwaukee— Editor. 



BUSINESS OPENING. 

"Western Progress" reports an open- 
ing at Anglia, Sask., for a hardware 
store. Anglia is a new town on the 
Moose Jaw branch of the C.P.R. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Handling Wallpaper in the Hardware Store 

A Section of the Store Should be Set Aside for This De- 
partment — Some of the Latest Ideas and Designs— Canadian 
Product is Showing Superiority — The Need of a Publicity 
Campaign. 



The idea that wallpaper makes a 
splendid department for the hardware 
store is rapidly gaining ground. More 
dealers are taking it up than ever be- 
fore and they are securing the very best 
of results. There is every reason why 
wallpaper should be handled by hard- 
waremen. The trade has become the 
recognized, and almost exclusive, me- 
dium for the retailing of paint, varnish 
and oil. Paint and wallpaper are 
"twin industries," so to speak. If the 
hardware dealer has proven himself the 
best handler of paint, why should he 
not be able to achieve similar results 
in the other, and newer, line? 

Department at Back. 

It is advisable, if not necessary, to 
have a special department separate in 
some way from the rest of the store, 
for^ wallpaper. A majority of the cus- 
tomers will be women and it is advis- 
able to have the stock so placed that 
they can look it over at their leisure, 
free from any confusion. The best plan 
is to lit up a space at the back of the 
store. 

In many cases, hardware dealers hire 
girls to act as clerks in their wallpaper 
department. If there is not always 
enough work to keep her busy, it is not 
a difficult matter to procure sufficient 
other employment to warrant her addi- 
tion to the staff. One dealer, with a 
brisk but not too large business in a 
small Ontario town, had for some years 
been desirous of securing a bookkeeper 
but had felt that the size of the busi- 
ness barely warranted the expenditure. 
It finally occurred to him that if he 
could get some other work which the 
bookkeeper could look after, as well as 
the books, he would be able to' make 
the addition to his staff. He accord- 
ingly put in a stock of wallpaper and 
hired a young lady to keep the books 
and act as saleswoman as well. The 
experiment was such a success that he 
finally found it necessary to secure a 
saleswoman to devote her entire time 
io wallpaper and he retained the first 
one as bookkeeper. 

Splendid Lines Produced. 

It is interesting to note that for the 
first time in the history of Canadian 
wallpaper making there have been pro- 
duced lines for which it is claimed that 
they are fit to compete with the highest 
class of the imported article. 

Not only are the designs original and 
unique, but they are specially adapted 
to the peculiar demands of the trade 



here. English ideals have been followed 
to a great extent, but not lavishly. By 
use of improved mechanical devices, the 
finish and surface of the paper has teen 
perfected to a degree which places it in 
the highest rank. Among these is the 
roller which "lifts" the newly-laid-on 
color and leaves a mottled or faintly 
patterned background, giving the effect 
of the handsome embossed paper, while 
practicable for extensive surfaces. 

Many imitations of leather are being 
shown, both for a plain filling where 
bands and appli'que panels, borders, etc., 
are used, and for a dado. The former 
effects predominate for the coming year. 

Strapping ani Cut-Out Designs. 

Whereas last season saw much use of 
a panel effect formed by cut-out designs, 
usually in floral patterns, with irregular 
edges, the new papers have strappings 
or band trimmings in fancy floral or 
conventional designs, to be pasted on in 
any desired form. Sometimes these 
strappings are combined with a cut-out 
motif in any fancy shape, or with a 
drop effect in a fancy floral frieze. 
Newer than the paneling idea is the use 
of strappings to outline the border and 
the windows and doors only. 

The above style is much used with 
the engraved leathers. The latter show 
a fine range of colors, tan, mouse, ele- 
phant, Paris tan, French grey, cham- 
pagne, brown and green included. The 
colorings are rich and durable. 

Advertise the Stock. 
In handling wallpaper it is necessary 
to do a certain amount of advertising. 
People cannot be expected to find out 
for themselves that this new line has 
been added to the store stock. It is 
advisable, therefore, to inaugurate the 
department with a brisk publicity cam- 
paign. Otherwise, it may take a longer 
time to secure a connection than the 
dealer had anticipated with the result 
that he is inclined to underestimate the 
selling power of the goods. 



THE LENDING OF TOOLS. 

Chatham. Ont.— "I notice that a mer- 
chant writes to Hardware and Metal in 
a rather sarcastic fashion concerning the 
renting of tools as an alternative for 
lending," remarked a hardwareman the 
other day. "And he was perfectly right, 
too. Our business is to sell, and not to 
rent. 

"Nevertheless, renting as an antidote 
to the borrowing habit has its value, I 
think. The merchant who laughed at the 

37 



notion may never have had any trouble 
with people wanting to borrow ; but if 
he did, his methods of dealing with them 
would prove interesting to a lot of mer- 
chants in all parts of Canada. 

"It isn't our regular customers so 
much as people who never buy. For in- 
stance, telephone linemen— who, I under- 
stand, get their tools supplied from 
headquarters — come prancing in now and 
then and want to borrow this or that. 
What would our friend say in such a 
case ? Or if the grocer next door want- 
ed a hammer to nail an addition to his 
shelf, how would our critic refuse an ac- 
commodation that might be for ten min- 
utes and might be for ten weeks ? 

"The beauty of the rental idea, it 
seems to me, is that you don't have to 
refuse anyone. There are people now 
and then to whom it would be a hard- 
ship to have to buy an article which 
they may use only once. Then there are 
other people, always borrowing the 
same article, who if they were changed 
a rental would buy outright ? The 
rental proposition looks like an accom- 
modation to the few who deserve it and 
a hint to a lot of other people who need 
to be jolted. 

"Not that I'd want to feature it. But 
anything that will extinguish the tool 
borrower and his kindred will look 
mighty good to a lot of us hardware- 
men." 



LEWIS BEOS.' FALL CATALOGUE. 

There are 152 pages to the new fall 
and winter sporting goods catalogue just 
issued by Lewis Bros., Limited, Mont- 
real. It is designed to help the buyer 
and this object has surely been accom- 
plished by a profusion of illustrations and 
tersely worded descriptions together 
with other detail. It is a very compre- 
hensive catalogue, showing a wide range 
of guns, revolvers, ammunition, shoot- 
ing jackets, targets, decoy ducks, in 
fact practically everything connected 
with shooting. Then there is a wide dis- 
play of skates, hockey sticks, rugby 
goods, police goods, snow shoes, athle- 
tic articles of all kinds and other differ- 
ent lines that come under the depart- 
ment of fall and winter sporting goods. 



"CLERKS' RECREATION" IN 
CHILLIWACK. 

Chilliwack, B.C.— Every Thursday all 
the stores close at 12 o'clock, a.m.. 
"Clerks' recreation," except when a 
general holiday occurs during the week. 
t Jas. Munro, hardwareman, lias recent- 
ly sold his business, it being taken over 
by Denmark & Burton, at the first of 
the month. 

Business in general is in a good, 
healthy condition. "With three live hard- 
";ins in town, it is very little in the 
hardware line that goes to the catalogue 
rouses from this district. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

(ESTABLISHED 1888) 

THE MACLEAN PUBLISHING CO., LIMITED 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN • President 

Publishers of Trad* Newspapers which circulate in tha Province! 
ol Britlah Columbia. Albarta. Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario. Qut- 
bec, Nova Scotia. Naw Brunawick. P.E. Ialand and Newfoundland 

CABLE ADDRESSES 
CANADA : Macpubco. Toronto. ENGLAND : Atabak. London. Enc. 

OFFICES 
Montraal 701-702 Eaatarn Townahipa Bank Building. Phona Main 12SS 
Toronto • • 143-149 Univenity At.duo. Phone Main 7324 

Winnipeg - - 34 Royal Bank Building. Phone Garry 2313 

Vancourar. B.C H. Hodgson. 11 Hartney Chambers 

London. Eng. • E. J. Dodd, 88 Fleet Street. E.C. Phone Central 12960 
Now York • R. B. Huestia. 115 Broadway. N.Y. Phone 2282 Cortlandt 
France John F. Jone* & Co.. 31bis Faubourg Montmartre, Paris 

SUBSCRIPTION 

Canada. $2: United States. $2.50; Great Britain. 8s. 6d.; elsewhere. 12s. 
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 



THE METAL SITUATION. 

There is a better tone to the metal situation in all 
directions. The cloud of semi-depression, which has ob- 
scured conditions in the United States almost since the 
first of the year, seems to be lifting. It is now reported 
that a much busier tone is noted there. Accepting iron 
and steel as the barometers of business conditions, there 
has been a pronounced betterment on American markets. 
There is an improvement in demand and more confidence 
is expressed on the part of both producers and consumers. 
As the Canadian market lias been rendered dull at some 
seasons very largely as a result of the depressing influ- 
ence of American conditions, it will readily be seen that 
the optimistic reports from the other side will have an 
immediate buoyant effect here. 

There is every indication of a busy time ahead in 
copper. Some of the largest producers assert that they 
are sold sixty days ahead and it is apparent that de- 
mand is beginning to outstrip supply. The marked im- 
provement in copper is due primarily to the steady 
foreign consumption. 

Tin is still controlled by the London syndicate. The 
"bulls" can do pretty much what they like with the mar- 
ket and they are showing their liking for a continuation 
of high prices. It is stated that the spectacular element 
is now lacking in the market, insomuch as general inter- 
• est has sunk to a low ebb. Speculative buying has been 
lacking but it is not at all improbable that the. "bears" 
will find later developments of high interest. The out- 
standing fact w^th reference to tin is that the price re- 
mains at a remarkably high level and is altogether likely 
to stay there. 



PARCELS POST AGAIN. 

The Parcels Post agitation bids fair to be renewed 
this year. As will be seen elsewhere in this issue, the 
Postmaster-General is having an investigation made with 
a view to reopening the subject. When the question was 
first brought to the front late in the year 1907, the op- 
position was so spontaneous and strong that Hon. Mr. 
Lemieux soon realized that public sentiment was against 
him and withdrew the measure. He stated at the time, 
however, that he would make further efforts to establish 
Parcels Post and he apparently intends to fulfil that 
promise. 

While there is nothing definite yet, no absolute cer- 
tainty that this obnoxious measure will again be intro- 
duced, there is sufficient danger to warrant the retail 
dealers in preparing to meet the emergency. If it is 



found that feeling runs just as strongly still against the 
idea as it did when the measure was first broached, it is 
not impossible that the advocates of Parcels Post will 
see the futility of attempting to put the legislation 
through. 

It is recognized by all who have studied the question 
that tlit- establishment of Parcels Post would give the 
mail order houses a greater opportunity than ever to 
cut into the trade of the home merchants. The loss 
would not rest wholly with the local dealer, however. It 
is an established fact that anything which serves to 
weaken the local merchant inevitably reacts against the 
whole community. The general public, would therefore 
suffer as well as the merchant and no other purpose 

would be served than the extension of the business d< 

by catalogue houses. 

The situation calls for prompt action. No time 
should be lost in letting the powers at Ottawa see that 
the feeling of opposition to the measure is just as strong 
as ever. . 



BARTERING— AND OTHER EVILS. 

"We do a large trade with farmers," said a retail 
hardware dealer, recently, "but we never have any diffi- 
culty as a result of customers wanting to do business on 
a bartering basis. Apparently, we are singularly fortun- 
ate in that respect. One of our clerks here comes from a 
store in a town not twenty miles from here and he says 
that up there every customer from the country wants to 
get goods in exchange for eggs and farm produce." 

There was no difference between the inhabitants of the 
rural sections around the two towns. The difference lay 
in the dealers. It was found by enquiry that the dealers 
in the one town had always rigidly discouraged barter- 
ing and had gradually brought the farming inhabitants 
to an understanding of the fact that they need not ex- 
pect to get goods at the hardware stores by process of 
barter. In the other town, the dealers had not united to 
rigidly discourage the practice and their rural customers 
had come to expect that they could get goods by that 
means. 

Many other practices of an undesirable nature could 
be checked if the dealers had the courage to stamp them 
out. The late closing evil exists only because merchants 
are afraid to stop it. Few hardwaremen are so placed 
that they find it necessary to keep open every evening. 



GIVE CLERKS A DEPARTMENT. 

The impression is growing that it pays to "depart- 
mentize" the store as far as possible. Even dealers who 
keep no more thari two or three clerks, will find that it 
pays to divide the store up into departments and place 
one member of the staff in charge of each. For instance, 
one clerk is supposed to look after builders' hardware, 
tools and paints. Another has sporting goods, cutlery 
and brass goods as his particular department. The third 
looks after stoves, tinware and granite goods. It is not 
meant by this that the clerks stick to those particular 
lines and do not have anything to do with the sale of 
other goods. On the contrary, the clerks are supposed 
to look after customers in any part of the store but, in 
addition to that, they are supposed to keeep their de- 
partments in order, to see that the stock is kept up to 
the mark and to study the goods until they get to know 
them thoroughly. Being responsible for the appearance 
of certain lines, the members of the staff will take great- 
er care in the arrangement of the goods and the propri- 



38 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



etor will find that the store is kept in a remarkably 
orderly way. Another great advantage is that the clerks 
get to know the goods in their own departments thor- 
oughly. It is well to have "specialists" in every de- 
partment ; the standard of salesmanship being raised 
considerably thereby. 

An objection sometimes voiced is that the clerks 
should be given a chance to work in all parts of the 
store. An all-around man is considered by a great many 
dealers to be far superior to a "specialist," no matter 
how extensive the knowledge of the latter on some one 
particular line may be. This difficulty can be overcome 
by shifting the members of the staff around. After a 
man has been long enough in builders' hardware and 
paints to gain a good knowledge of that end of the busi- 
ness, shift him over to the stove and tinware end. This 
is the surest method of all of turning out real all-around 



men. 



PROSPERITY IN WEST. 

That the hardware business in the far west is growing 
steadily and rapidly, is attested by the experience of a 
representative of a wholesale firm, who recently returned 
from a trip through British Columbia. He states that he 
found that province fairly pulsing with characteristic 
prosperity and optimism. He had more tangible evidence 
to produce, however, in the shape of tihe increased busi- 
ness of the firm he represented, all through the Rocky 
Mountains and Pacific Coast sections. The year 1910 had 
been by far the best in the firm's history but its record 
had already been exceeded this year by over 30 per cent. 
This is truly a remarkable showing and it cannot be said 
that the one company is alone enjoying this unprecenented 
prosperity. Reports from other sections indicate that 
many companies are finding the returns from that part of 
the country exceptionally large. Neither can it be said 
that British Columbia enjoys a monopoly of the prosper- 
ity, for the wave of industrial advance spreads east 
across the Rockies and takes in all sections of the West- 
ern provinces. Nor does it stop at the Great Lakes, for 
the East is also showing every sign of abounding pros- 
perity. 

CARD WRITING AN ASSET. 

If any of his clerks show a talent for card writing, 
the dealer should encourage them in every way possible. 
That talent can be made of great value in the store. 
Neatly written or printed cards are a wonderful help in 
selling goods. This has been proven so often and in so 
many different ways that most dealers nowadays make 
some effort to secure cards to draw attention to certain 
lines. 

The writer knows a d«aler who discovered a latent 
talent for drawing and art work generally in a member 
of his staff. By giving the clerk an opportunity to de- 
velop his skill, the dealer found that he possessed a singu- 
lar knack for the preparation of attractive cards and 
signs. The clerk has been turning out a fresh supply 
each week since, frequently using simple cartoons and 
neat scroll work to enhance the appearance of the cards. 
The result has been that sales have improved quite notice- 
ahlv. Goods, which formerly reposed unnoticed on the 
shelves, have been brought into prominence by means of 
attractive cards and promptly cleared out. 

Neat price cards are real "silent salesmen" and the 
clerk who can do creditable work in that way is worth 
more to the proprietor than he otherwise would be. 

39 



POINTED EDITORIALS. 

Write to your member of parliament now. 

• • • 

Turpentine is determined, it seems, to get the cellai 
as well as the altitude record. Still going down. 



One hundred sleighs sold in one day is telling proof 
of the value of the store window as a "sales force." 



Many merchants are slaves, with almost endless hours 
of toil, because they lack the courage to sign their own 

emancipation. 

* * • 

The devasting fire in Northern Ontario has shown 
that doing without fire insurance is false economy of the 

worst type. 

• » * 

Twixt optimist and pessimist the difference is droll, 
The optimist the doughnut sees, the pessimist the 
hole. — Hardware Reporter. 



A ease is known where a cartoon, drawn on a price 
card, was directly responsible for the sale of three wash- 
ing machines. A little ingenuity of this kind always pays. 



Experience proves that the man who closes at 6 p.m. 
does as much business as the man who does not drag 
himself away until 11 p.m. The advantage is his in every 
other way. 

* • • 

The "bears" on the tin market are expecting develop- 
ments in September. If history repeats itself, the de- 
velopments will probably be of a highly painful nature 

for the "bears." 

* • • 

When a clerk has one department in his charge, he 
finds more opportunity for the display of energy and 
originality. He is responsible, in a sense, for the sales 
in that department. 



A Winnipeg dealer reports that a customer asked him 
the other day for the articles required for paper-bag 
cooking. "Haven't stocked them yet," was the reply. 
"But call back in two weeks and I'll be able to supply 

you." 

• * • 

Like the giant Antaeus, who came up stronger every 
time he touched Mother Earth, Parcels Post bobs up 
every few months in the United States. In the end, Her- 
cules slew Antaeus, and it is a safe assumption that the 
opposing forces will finally squelch the ' ubiquitous advo- 
cates of Parcels Post. 



"At present, we are fighting against windmills," said 
Hon. Mr. Lemieux in announcing the withdrawal of the 
Parcels Post Measure in 1907. Apparently, he has de- 
cided to try another tilt. The simile is rather an unfor- 
tunate one for the worthy Postmaster-General to have 
adopted. Does he not remember how quickly Don 
Quixote was unhorsed when he rode against the wind- 
mill? 



Stove Dealers Should Get in Touch with Field 

Publicity Methods are Needed to Offset the Catalogue House Influence — 
"Talk" Your Stock Through Advertisements, Store Windows, Etc. — Some Sug- 
gestions for Demonstrations 



Mail order competition in the- stove 
department is quite a serious menace, 
li is ielt severely in many sections. It 
is not found formidable, however, where 
the local dealer keeps in touch with 
the public and lets the people know 
what he lias in stock and the real 
merit of the goods he handles. 

Briefly, the public buy stoves from 
mail onier houses for these reasons: 
They do not know that the local dealer 
can sell them the same variety of stove 
for the same price. They do not appre- 
ciate the fact that the higher priced 
stove in the local store is well worth 
the difference in price. The stoves in 
the catalogue look attractive and cheap. 
People do not look to the future, when 
the question of repairs will arise. They 
do not appreciate the many good reas- 
ons why their partronage should go to 
the home dealer. 

It is practically certain that, after a 
few moments' conversation with the 
local dealer or after a visit to the 
local store, the average person would 
see the folly of buying a stove from an 
outside source. It is only when left 
alone, to thresh out the problem of 
purchasing a new stove all by them- 
selves with nothing to guide them but 
the brilliantly illustrated and alluringly 
worded catalogues of the mail order 
house, that people place their orders 
that way. If the arguments on the 
other side of the question— the local 
dealer's side— are presented to the no- 
tice of the prospective purchaser, the 
decision will go the right way in a 
great majority of cases. 

Where Dealers Lack. 

The streDgth of the mail order cam- 
paign lies largely in the fact that it 
has the field to itself. To offset this 
opposition, the dealer needs to assert 
himself, to "talk" to the people. It is, 
of course, impossible for him to see 
personally every possible customer in 
his district but the newspaper provides 
a ready means of reaching practically 
. everyone. "Talk" your stoves through 
the columns of the newspaper. Use 
your advertising space to show why the 
trade of the people of that section 
should come to your store instead of 
being sent to a big. corporation in a far- 
off city. The advertisement will reach 
as many home in your city or country 
section as the catalogues and the same 
opportunity -is thus presented of talking 
stoves as the catalogue man has. There 
is this difference. The catalogue is is- 
sued once a year, probably, and the ad- 
vertisement of the local dealer appears 



every day lie has (lie advantage of be- 
ing able to pound home his arguments 
by force of repetition. And, to top it 
all, he has the better case to present. 

Other Means of Display. 

Hut the local dealer has other means 
to hand of "talking" to the public. He 
can "talk" through the medium of his 
store windows. He can "talk" through 
the potent influence of long years of 
good service and courteous treatment. 
Lastly, ht can "talk" through the me- 
dium of manufacturers' aids. The dealer 
who follows out the plans of his manu- 
facturer and makes use of the publicity 
material, which the manufacturer sup- 
plies, will undoubtedly find that results 
follow. 

Just let the people know that you 
are in the stove business in real earnest 
and that you must be reckoned with 
when the question of a stove purchase 
comes up; and the battle will be more 
than half won. 

Demonstrations Popular. 

It is becoming - more apparent every 
day that the demonstration is an effec- 
tual method of exploiting any particu- 
lar line of goods. Demonstrations arc 
being held in all parts of the country 
and an unvarying success is being scor- 
ed. 

In the stove department, this method 
is found to be of particular value. In 
the first place people who are in need of 
a new range consider the matter of suf- 
ficient importance to attend a demon- 
si ration. Their attendance at demon- 
strations of less important articles may 
be of a more or less casual nature, but 
they will make a special trip downtown 
when it is a question of stoves. As a re- 
sult, there is always a good attendance 
of interested spectators. 

Suggestions for Demonstrations. 
At the present time, the stove dealer 
could not do better than adopt as a 
demonstration feature the new paper- 
bag cookery. It is asserted by those 
who have seen appetizing dishes prepar- 
ed by the paper bag method, that it is 
not a fad, that it is a "sure enough" 
discovery which promises to cause a 
complete change in culinary methods. 
That there is some merit in the inven- 
tion of M. Soyer is reasonably certain, 
and it is still more sure that the gen- 
eral public is being aroused to curiosity. 
If paper-hag cooking has come to stay, 
it will mean a lucrative business for 
hardwaremen in handling the necessary 
fittings. But whether it has come to 

40 



slay or not, the tact remains that a de- 
monstration of the method would fie 
mightily popular at the present time and 
would draw large crowds to the store. 
Which, of course, is one of the primary 
objects of demonstrations. 

Another good idea would be to fea- 
ture a number of the many new articles, 
in the way of cooking utensils, 
which are coming on the market. There 
are, for instance, kettles with lids at the 
side instead of the center, saucepans 
with strainers and a great variety of 
other articles, which have some distinct- 
ly new feature to recommend them. A 
demonstration of such articles would 
have an interest ' for every housewife, 
and would draw large attendances. 

Where Advantage Lies. 

One of the chief advantages that a de- 
monstration offers is the opportunity 
thus presented to advertise the stove 
stock. With the active stove season 
now drawing close, every dealer is 
anxious to get his name well before the 
public in that connection. Anything, 
which would serve to take people to the 
store then between the present and the 
opening of the fall stove season, would 
serve as an excellent preparatory meas- 
ure for the campaign to be waged later 
on. 



BOOKLET ON RATCHETS. 

The Armstrong Bros. Tool Co. have 
issued their new, booklet, No. 4, devoted 
to their line of ratchet drills. They 
cover practically the entire field, as the 
booklet shows, their stock of universal 
ratchets, packer ratchets, short ratchets 
and standard reversible ratchets being 
illustrated and described. 



NEW MARLIN CATALOGUE. 

The Marlin Firearms Co., New Haven, 
Conn., have issued a new catalogue, 
which describes the complete line of 
Marlin repeating rifles and shotguns, and 
also the Marlin handcuffs, manufacture 
of which was resumed recently. A large 
number of new lines are shown, includ- 
ing their model 27, a pump action repeat- 
er model in .25-20 and .-'52-20 calibers; 
Model 20, full magazine rifle, a pump 
action .22 that shoots 25 times at one 
loading; Model 30, 16 gauge light -weight 
repeating shotguns, and the new Marlin 
Field Model repeating shotguns in 12 
and 16 gauges. A new price list has been 
issued, which eliminates discounts and 
rebates, and shows by printed figures 
just what the dealer's cost and mini- 
mum selling price are. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Hardwareman Elected to High Civic Post 



The newly-elected Mayor of Waterloo, 
Ontario, is W. G. Weichel, wholesale 
and retail hardwareman of that place. 
His election to the high office was 
unanimous, no other name being 
proposed at the nomination. Mr. 
Weichel is a young man to attain 
to the highest post in • the gift of his 
home municipality; being 41 years of 
age. Twenty years ago, he left his 
home in Elmira and engaged with Shur- 
ly & Dietrich at Gait, as shipper. This 
post he occupied for three years. He 
then went on the road for the company, 
selling the R. H. Smith saws, etc., a 
branch of the Shurly-Dietrich business. 
After some years' experience in travel- 
ing, he settled down in Waterloo, so 
that it can truly be said that he has 
had experience in all branches of the 
hardware trade — manufacturing, sales, 
wholesale and retail. 




W. G. Weichel, Newly-Elected Mayor of 
Waterloo, Ont. 

He has been in Waterloo over 14 
years and, during that period, has be- 
come known as one of the most progres- 
sive of hardwaremen. The Waterloo 
store of M. Weichel & Son, is conducted 
on good business precepts. I L is large 
and attractively arranged, with good 
sized show windows. Hardware and 
Metal has in the past produced illustra- 
tions of window displays shown in the 
Weichel store. The advertising end of 
the business is ably looked after, 
"Weichel's Weekly Store News" hein<s, 
published every week in the local 
papers. 



Mr. Weichel has served on the coun- 
cil for four years, the last two years as 
chairman of the Finance Committee. 
Last year he was elected deputy reeve 
and filled that position with ability 
until, at the demise of Mayor Graybill, 
he was selected to fill the vacancy as 
chief magistrate. 

In addition to municipal offices, Mr. 
Weichel has been prominently connected 
with other local bodies. He has served 
as president of the Board of Trade, and 
last year had the honor of being elected 
president of the Canadian Club of Berlin 
and Waterloo. 



SHORTAGE AND DAMAGES. 

The Canadian General Electric Co. 
have issued an important notice regard- 
ing shortages of and damages to goods 
in transit. Some of the clauses are well 
worthy the attention of hardwaremen. 
The more important terms of the circu- 
lar read : 

"To avoid any misunderstanding, 
please bear in mind the fact that as soon 
as a shipment made by us is received 
in good order by the transportation 
company our responsibility ceases, and 
t'"e goods belong to you. 

"If you do not receive all the goods 
covered by our bill of lading and memo, 
of shipment, then the transportation 
company is responsible to you for your 
loss, and when paying the freight 
charges and signing for the goods, you 
should have the number of cases short, 
or the damage, cause and extent of same 
noted on your "Freight Paid Receipt," 
and signed by the transportation com- 
pany's representative. 

"It is not uncommon to discover 'con- 
cealed damage' after the goods have 
beeen signed for and delivered and 
charges paid. In such cases cease un- 
packing immediately the damage is dis- 
covered, and call upon the transportation 
company to send a representative to in- 
spect the goods. Also have him note 
the extent of the damage and condition 
of the package on your freight paid re- 
ceipt and sign the same. 

"When you desire to enter claim re- 
turn to us the 'Memorandum Bill of Lad- 
ing,' if possible, and we will mail you 
the 'Original' for claim purposes. 

"When sending your claim to the rail- 
way agent of the transportation com- 
pany who delivered the goods, support 
it by the following documents: Cer- 
tified copy of shippers' invoice, original 
bill of lading, and freight paid receipt, 
bearing the notation already referred to, 
41 



and accompany all papers by a letter 
giving such explanation as may seem 
necessary in connection with your loss. 

"Retain copies of all papers sent the 
i ailway company, as sometimes they are 
lost and duplicates are required. Enter 
the account in your 'ledger,' and record 
the railway company's claim 

number opposite the account. 

When coresponding about your* 
claim you are always sure of a 
prompt reply by quoting the railway 
claim file number." 



GAINS ARE REPORTED. 

Cleveland, 0., July 27. — The Iron 
Trade Review to-day says: — 

The first of the midsummer months 
has passed without any noticeable slow- 
ing down in mill operations, as compar- 
ed with June, which^ with the exception 
of March, was the best month during 
the first half of the year. Despite the 
fact that many mills were closed for in- 
ventory and repairs, and that orders 
were light early this month, manufac- 
turers report that mill orders for semi- 
finished steel, structural steel, rails, 
bars and sheets for July will show little, 
if any, decline as compared with June, 
and two companies report a decided gain 
in mill orders for steel bars in the 
month. Steel bars, structural steel and 
sheets are the most active branches of 
the trade, while the wire market is ex- 
tremely dull. There has been little buy- 
ing by the railroads this month, but con- 
siderable business from this source is 
expected in August, as more favorable 
reports are being made by the transpor- 
tation companies. The Cambria Steel 
Co., Johnstown, Pa., is operating all 
of its eight blast furnaces and the Car- 
negie Steel Co. started two additional 
blast furnaces at its Ohio works. The 
American Sheet & Tin Plate Co. started 
eight tin mills at its American plant, 
Ellwood, Ind., and six sheet mills at 
the Aetna-Standard plant, Bridgeport, 
0., and is operating its sheet and tin 
mills at about 75 per cent, of capacity. 
Orders for pipe placed by Pittsburg gas 
interests during the week include 26 
miles of 16-inch steel line pipe, five 
miles of 12-inch steel line pipe, and 
six miles of 3-inch iron tubing. The 
coke market is quiet, but prices are 
firmer and a similar condition exists in 
the scrap market. 

Including the purchase of 62,000 tons 
or basic pig iron by the Republican Iron 
& Steel Company, it is estimated thai 
from 90,000 to 100,000 tons of this grade 
have changed hands in the Pittsburg and 
valley districts during the past two 
weeks. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ireflections of] 




By "Mack." 

In the movement towards the exter- 
mination of all disease, the importance 
of free circulation of fresh air is em- 
phasized by most of our teachers of 
hygiene. Attention is directed to the 
necessity of pure air in our sleeping 
rooms, and we are advised to allow our 
windows to remain open at night. There 
is little reason to question the benefit 
which we receive to our general health 
by providing abundance of air for our 
lungs to inhale during sleep. Never- 
theless, there are occasionally to be 
found opponents of the open bedroom 
window, who do not accept this modern 
theory of hygiene, and follow the time- 
honored custom of lowering the sash of 
their chamber window at night very re- 
ligiously. And they are not all invalids, 
either, as they ought to be after many 
years of inhaling expired air in a close 
room at regular intervals. I hold in my 
mind now an old gentleman who at 77 
years of age puts the window down se- 
curely, "to keep out the night air," and 
sleeps soundly, has a first rate appetite 
and good general health without the aid 
of outside air, at least during the night, 
except, perhaps, a few nights when it 
is very hot in the summer. A case like 
this one, of course, does not discredit 
the fresh air theory, or, we may now 
say, the pure air cure, but is accounted 
for by the chemical changes within the 
body producing a substance which re- 
sists the bacteria or germs of the various 
ailments which are fostered by bad air, 
and enables the individaul to retain his 
usual health. It should be added that 
in all other physical health laws, the 
gentleman to whom I have referred gives 
faithful observance, being moderate in 
all things. 

And so, in the retail hardware busi- 
ness, I can, I believe, bring forward an 
example of a successful store conducted 
upon old lines, and with no concession 
made to modern method and equipment, 
powerfully opposing the aggressive cam- 
paigns year after year of the big cata- 
logue firms of Toronto and other cities, 
besides the competition of local stores. 



Others operate under the bargain giving 
and advertising plan, coupled with an at- 
tractive shop front and the interior store 
conveniences for taking care of the 
stock, which may now be seen in the 
larger hardwares. Aiming at quicker re- 
sults and perhaps generated by men of 
a younger school of salesmanship, the 
hardware organization of to-day invari- 
ably wrests the business supremacy from 
its older rival with conservative ten- 
dencies. This is the working of the law 
of survival, and although instances oc- 
cur similar to the one recited, the gen- 
eral principles upon which the business 
is founded, united to the personality 
and thought of the management, have 
prevailed and averted defeat. 



Twenty Years Ago 

In the Canadian Hardware Trade 



BACK FROM THE WEST. 
St. John, N.B., July 22.— W. S. Fish- 
er, a member of the firm of Emerson 

6 Fisher, general hardware dealers, . re- 
turned this week from an extended trip 
through the west. Speaking of his visit, 
he said he was interested in the ac- 
tivity shown by Maritime merchants in 
displaying and advertising their goods 
throughout the west where competition 
was keen. Stoves and furnaces from dif- 
ferent eastern foundries, brass goods, 
brushes, edged tools, and other articles 
of maritime manufacture, Mr. Fisher 
said, had attained a strong hold in the 
prairie provinces. Having agencies scat- 
tered through the west, he said, many 
maritime firms were finding the sale of 
their goods much easier. 

There is still no settlement of the 
early closing question. While the by- 
law governing the closing of stores at 

7 p.m. has been passed for some time 
by the common council the police ma- 
gistrate this week dismissed the cases 
before him, wherein dealers had been re- 
ported for violation of the law, saying 
that he could not see the justification 
of imposing a penalty for transgression 
in this connection. Local retail mer- 
chants do not know whether they should 
close their doors at 7 or not. The ma- 
jority desire to live as law-abiding citi- 
zehs, but in view of the decision given 
by the magistrate are nonplussed as to 
whether or not thev are compelled to 
close. It is expected that a settlement 
of a satisfactory nature may soon be 
reached . 

In sympathy with the movement which 
has become widespread throughout the 
province for . the shortening of hours of 
labor, and for the keeping of a weekly 
half-holiday, the merchants of St. 
Stephen have agreed to observe Thurs- 
day of each week as a half-holiday, in 
the same manner as do Fredericton, St. 
John and other cities. Fredericton ob- 
serves Thursday and St. John Saturday. 
42 



The following notes are taken from 
the columns of the August 1, 1891, 
issue of Hardware & Metal: 

Heavy arrivals of cement and 
want of storage have occasioned a 
regular glut of cement, prices being 
from 10 to 15 cents lower than 
they were a fortnight ago. A fort- 
night ago good English brands 
were in light supply, existing con- 
tracts absorbing all the arrivals on 
a basis of $2.40 to $2.60; now mat- 
ters are altogether different. We 
have noted heavy arrivals by steam- 
er. 

Editor's Note.— It is interesting to 
note that the price of cement is now 
much lower than the figures quoted 
twenty years ago. 

OUR FURNACE BOOK is the 
title of Clare Bros. & Co.'s illus- 
trated catalogue of furnaces, regist- 
ers, etc., made in their factory at 
Preston. The book contains a dis- 
cussion of the comparative merits 
of heating by hot water, steam and 
hot air and places great store on 
ventilation as an advantage peculiar 
to the last method. 

TRADE CHAT.— B. R. Hamilton, 
hardware dealer, Neepawa, B.C., is 
building a handsome brick store.— 
The employes of the Greening Wire 
Works held their second annual pic- 
nic to the Falls on Saturday. — 
Elias H. Lyons, who has for the 
past thirteen years been with M. 
& L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co., has 
severed his connection with that 
firm.— W. & J. Kirkup, hardware 
dealers, Vancouver, have dissolved 
partnership.— R. R. PhUp, hardware 
dealer, Castleton, Ont., has been 
burned out. 



JOBBERS NOW FOLLOWING STOCK 
SHEETS CLOSELY. 

Montreal, July 7.— It is rather inter- 
esting to note than in several cases at 
least, those in the sales department of 
the wholesale houses are watching close- 
ly some of their stock sheets. This ap- 
plies especially to seasonable lines. The 
demand in a number of instances has 
been exceedingly heavy and goods were 
mentioned to Hardware and Metal that 
have been sold out. In these lines even 
the manufacturers are out of goods. Ar- 
ticles might be mentioned if it were not 
simply the general condition prevailing 
in some seasonable lines that is concern- 
ed. 



New Hardware Goods 



NEW ROSS RIFLE. 

The Ross Rifle Co. announce that 
their 22 calibre rifle will be ready for 
the market in the fall. The new rifle, 
an illustration of which is herewith pro- 
duced, offers some entirely new features. 
The action is of the straight pull vari- 
ety and is very rapid indeed, the corn- 



side. The thumb piece holds the latch 
bolt either in or out. This night latch 
has a strong cast case, finely finished 
knob and thumb piece, extra long latch 
bolt and can be supplied with a master 
key when desired. Strikes both for 
regular and reverse bevel doors are sup- 
plied. 



understanding that the purchasers are 
able to pay for them. 



NEW SHELVING ARRANGEMENT. 

The Richards-Wilcox Mfg. Co., Aurora, 
111., are offering their No. 629 shelving 
as shown in the accompanying illustra- 







pany claiming that it is« the most rapid 
single shot action sold. The sights are 
also new and the arm takes a 22 short, 
22 long, or 22 long rifle cartridge. A 
single screw "takes down" the rifle. It 
is understood that this rifle will 
retail at about $6.50. 

CORBIN NO. 1356 NIGHT LATCH. 

The device shown in the accompanying 
illustration is the latest addition to the 




Corbin line. It has the characteristics 
of the No. 356 Corbin night latch with 
the additional advantage that the 
latch can be operated from the outside 
by the key at all times. It can be 
either locked or unlocked entirely in- 
dependent of the thumb piece on the in- 



SELLING DOG COLLARS. 

"Dog collars," said a hardware man 
a few days ago, "are worth more at- 
tention than they usually receive. You 
will generally find the stock of these 
goods rather mediocre, a sure sign that 
the proprietor does not realize that 
there is a good profit and a fair demand 
in this line." "But," it was objected, 
"it is only dog fanciers who would take 
any interest ,,,. in the collar you speak 
of." 

"It might surprise you," he replied, 
"to know just how many will buy good 
collars. There are a lot of dogs, good 
dogs I mean, and their owners can af- 
ford to give therm good collars. •„ But 
very frequently they will go to a har- 
ness maker and ask him to make a col- 
lar simply because the goods carried by 
the hardware man are not worth carry- 
ing away. 

"There is something to know about 
this line. You should be able to tell 
what size collar is required for the dif- 
ferent dogs. A St. Bernard will take 
a big collar and you should be able to 
tell what width is required, and so on. 
The smaller dogs take smaller collars. 
The owner of a dog wants to see it 
with a respectable, strong collar. 

"During the hunting season there is 
always a good demand for this line, 
and the hardware man with a sporting 
goods department should keep a case of 
collars with a good supply on hand, 
and my experience has been that it is 
better to carry a classy line of collars 
43 



tion. The uprights are made of heavy 
slotted tubing and provided with adjust- 
able supports fpr shelves. With this 
the shelving can quickly be made to ac- 
commodate articles of various heights. 

Dealers will find this shelving very 
convenient for their bolts, household 




utensils, parts for agricultural imple- 
ments, paint, oil, tools, shelf hard- 
ware, etc. 

There is no shrinkage to contend with 
and the position of shelves can be 
changed any time. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



News and Methods of Canadian Hardwaremen 

A Nature Window at Montreal— New Firm Start in Western City— Free Trial 
of Western Machines Offered by Stratford Dealer. 



Montreal, July 27— A miniature lake, 
an old mill with its wheel in action, 
cocky shores, real live fish and other 
representations are included in what 
might be called a fisherman's window, 
shown this week by R. & W. Kerr, ie- 
iail hardware men, St. Catherine St. 
It is compart and in proportion and the 
idea has been well carried out. A little 
stream of water trickles through the 
mill and over the wheel which is thus 
kept turning! The water in the "lake" 
is four or live inches deep, showing a 
sandy hot torn, with here a nd there a 
pebble. The shore is made af moss and 
rocks and a tiny canoe, pulled up near 
the mill, adds to the effectiveness of 
the scene. Fish swim around at times 
but arc rather modest and try to hide 
from the gaze of the people who stop 
to admire. Naturally, fishing appli- 
ances, with price cards, constitute the 
practical part of the display, which re- 
fiects credit upon the window dresser. 

A commendable feature of this store's 
treatment of their windows is the fre- 
quent changes that are made. It is a 
rare occasion when something to inter- 
est the public is not shown iu either of 
the windows. 



GIVING FREE TRIAL. 

Stratford, -July 24.— J. R. Myers is 
advertising a free test of a washing ma- 
chine to all customers. He offers to 
send the machine to the home for a free 
trial. After using it, the housewife can 
send it back to the store, if she so de- 
sires. In the ad. it is claimed that the 
washer "turns the clothes, distributes 
the soap and does the washing." 

It is understood that the plan has 
worked out exceptionally well. Not on 
ly have a great many people given the 
machine a trial but they have afterward 
made purchases, in a great many cases. 



trie irons, electric stoves, toasters, 
washing machines, ovens, etc., all oper- 
ated by the new current. The demand 
has been so large that the dealers are 
finding it necessary to lay in larger sup- 
plies. 

Several dealers have only handled elec- 
trical goods for a short time and they 
are now delighted at their forethought 
in having engaged in this line in time. 

STRIKE IS SETTLED. 

Calgary, July 21. — Since last writing 
the tinners' strike has been settled 
This matter was adjusted on a compro- 
mise basis, satisfactory to both parties, 
we are informed. 

T. R. Stuart & Co. are rushing their 
new store on 7th Avenue to a finish, as 
they will shortly be compelled to vacate 
their present quarters on 8th Avenue, 
where the Molsons Bank will erect their 
new structure. 

The Cordon Nail Works, of St. John, 
N. B., will shortly erect a new factory 
here; in fact, we understand, they have 
purchased sufficient land in the Man- 
chester Subdivision for their location, 
and work will commence on their new 
buildings in the course of a few days. 

In view of the fact that so many new 
houses are being erected here, the Comer 
Hardware Co., of 8th Avenue, have 
taken the situation by the forelock, and 
have a complete bathroom equipment in 
their large windows, consisting of every- 
thing used in a bathroom. This window 
display is truly the production of a fer- 
tile brain, and is sure to bring results to 
this firm. 



ELECTRICAL GOODS SELLING. 

Port Arthur, July 22— As a result of 
the advent of 24-hour electric power in 
this city, there has been a great de- 
mand for electrical goods and the hard- 
waremen, who handle these lines, have 
been kept busy supplying the insistent 
demands of customers. 

"I want you to quote me prices on 
electric irons, toasters, kettles, and any- 
thing else you have in stock that I can 
use now that we have 21-hour current," is 
a statement heard every hour of the 
day now in local hardware stores 

The new system makes power so much 
cheaper that people are all buying elec- 



FEATURING BASKETS. 

Ottawa, July 25— McKinley & 
Northwood arc making a special effort 
to sell picnic and market baskets. With 
this purpose in view they have devoted 
one of the store windows to a display 
of these goods. A splendid assortment 
is shown in all colors and sizes, running 
in price from the 10c. splint basket up 
to the SI. 75 white straw double cover 
variety. 

The goods have been advertised in the 
daily papers, good sized space being 
used. The ads. have been well arranged 
and illustrated. The result has been a 
steady volume of business in baskets of 
all varieties. 

McKinley & Northwood have adopt- 
ed the unusual and courageous plan of 
closing at 6 p.m. on Saturdays this 
summer. The arrangement has been fol- 
lowed out during the past month and 
will be continued through August. 

44 



MERCHANTS' DAY HELD. 

Sackville, N.B., July 27.— "Merchants 
Day was observed here yesterday. Dur- 
ing the day the local merchants held 
special sales and price inducements were 
offered in many lines. It is stated that 
a great amount of business was done, 
the public responding freely to the spirit 
of the occasion. 

Geo. S. Wry, hardware and paint deal- 
er, held a special sale during the morn- 
ing in Paris green, linseed oil and other 
lines. Paris green* was advertised for 
sale at 22 cents per can until noon. In 
the afternoon he sold pure linseed oil at 
a reduced price. Wall paper and glass 
sold at special quotations and bargains 
generally were offered on all stock. 

J. E. Fillmore & Son sold haying 
tools, hammocks, and cutlery at "extra 
special" prices, a great volume of busi- 
ness being done. 

HARDWARE STORE SUFFERED. 

Barons, Alta., July 20.— The thriving 
little village of Barons had its usual 
Sunday quietness disturbed i to-day by a 
fire which for a time threatened the ex- 
istence of the place. 

It started in the Crown lumber yards 
and spread to the rear of Hansen's Bro- 
thers' hardware store, destroying a 
storage shed there and also a stable be- 
longing to Dr..Wallwin. 

The villagers fought hard with buckets 
and a special train from Lethbridge 
hustled a chemical engine to the scene. 

BANKER TURNS HARDWAREMAN. 

North Vancouver, July 22.— The hard- 
ware business of J. D. Fraser & Co., 
on Lonsdale Avenue, has been disposed 
of. The new proprietors are F. T. Sals- 
bury, local manager of the Bank of. Brit- 
ish North America and J. Johnston, 
formerly of Calgary. The new firm will 
take possession on Tuesday next. 

Salisbury & Johnstone have announced 
their acquisition of the business by tak- 
ing large space in the daily papers, a 
cut of their store being used. Mr. 
Johnstone has been a traveling sales- 
man with an Eastern hardware house for 
eight years, and, prior to that, he was 
with Thomas Dunn. 

The new firm will greatly increase' 
their stock, will install new fixtures and 
completely reorganize the business. 
They will pay special attention to the 
supplying of household articles. 

The store has been closed for a few 
days for stock-taking. 



PORTABLE LIGHTS. 

Among the exhibits at the . Winnipeg 
Exhibition, the Pitner Gasoline Light- 
ing Co. showed their latest invention, 
the Portable Lamp. This lamp can be 
rolled upon the floor while burning, and 
can even be burned upside down with- 
out damage. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HARDWARE TRADE GOSSIP 



Ontario. 

The Macdonald Manufacturing Co., 
Stratford, are adding to their property 
and may enlarge their factory. 

J. Forsyth, an employee of H. W. 
Marshall, hardware dealer, Kingston, 
had his hand badly injured while mov- 
ing some heavy goods. 

The Down Draft Furnace Co., Gait, are 
finishing additions to their plant which 
will increase their capacity 60 per cent, 
and their output accordingly. 

Friends of L. J. Levy, traveling sales- 
man with Boeckh Bros. Co., will regret 
t;> learn of the death of his little daugh- 
ter from burns sustained while playing 
with matches. 

('. A. Postlv, representing the Leo 
Schlesinger & Co., New York, manufac- 
turers of brass goods and bathroom fix- 
tures, was in Toronto t»his week, in the 
interests of the Canadian business of the 
firm. 

The George Taylor Hardware Com- 
pany, New Liskeard, have taken out the 
old front in their building and have put 
in new and greatly improved windows. 
The new front lets in much more light 
and has a very up-to-date appearance. 

Cole & Robertson are opening a new 
hardware store on Eighth street east, 
Owen Sound, and are stocking up with 
a general line of hardware, stoves, paints 
and oils. Both are young men and are 
well known in Owen Sound. They expect 
to open for business on August 25. 

Tke Hobbs Hardware Co. baseball 
team, London, defeated McCormicks in 
the London city league by 6 runs to 5. 
The baseball team of Bernhardt & 
Gies, Preston, leads the town league, 
having won five games and lost two. 
They recentlv defeated Clare Bos., by 
12 to 10. 

Sympathy will be extended to Pres- 
ident R. C. Chown, of the O.R.H. and 
S.D.A., in the sad loss he has sustained. 
His infant son, Gerald Irwin, aged 10 
months and ten days, passed away on 
Thursday of last week, the cause of 
death being given as acute meningitis. 
The funeral took place to Belleville cem- 
etery, Rev. W. G. Clarke officiating. 

Edward Webb & Son will have the 
nlans completed this week for the new 
factory for the Tudhope-Anderson Com- 
pany, which will be built in Orillia. 
Const ruction work will commence next 
week. The Tudhope-Anderson Company 
is capitalized at three millions and is 
the result of a merger of the Perrin 
Plow and Stove Company of Smith's 
Falls, the Tudhope-Knox Company, of 
Orillia. the Tudhope-Anderson Company, 
of Winnipeg. 



A serious fire broke out in the 
Butchard hardware store, Owen Sound. 
When the employes arrived, they discov- 
ered that fire had started in the cellar, 
and immediately raised the alarm. By 
the time the firemen arrived, the blaze, 
which had evidently started among the 
oils and paints stored in the northwest 
corner of the cellar, had swept rig(ht for 
the elevator shaft, and was pouring oily 
smoke and flames up at an alarming 
rate. The hose was brought into prompt 
requisition and with chemicals was soon 
busy^ keeping down the flames. For some 
time there was danger of an explosion 
on account of all the combustibles stored 
in the cellar, but fortunately the fire- 
men were in the nick of time. The ele- 
vator shaft, which last time was a 
source of assistance to the fire, this 
time confined it within narrow limits. 
The danger was felt to be so great that 
the employes were removing, as far as 
possible, all the valuables or any con- 
bustible articles, to a place of safety. 
In this way Jack Robertson got his 
hands severely burnt, as he was attempt- 
ing to carry out a barrel of burning 
oil. Not a great deal of damage was 
done to the stock. 

Quebec. 

G. A. Irwin, with Drummond, McColl 
& Co., is spending his holidays at Bay 
View. 

J. W. Richardson, of Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co., is spending his holidays at 
"Cushing," on the Ottawa. 

Joseph E. Lemieux, hardwareman of 
Quebec city, visited Montreal last week 
and was introduced at the Board of 
Trade by Wm. H. Evans. 

Friends of Fred C. Lariviere, pres- 
ident of the Chambre de Commerce, 
Montreal, and a widely known retail 
hardwareman, will sympathize with him 
in .the recent death of his mother. 

Edwin Dowsley, of A. Ramsay & Son 
Co., is in Europe where, it is expected, 
he will spend several months. His 
friends sincerely hope that he will re- 
turn showing new health. Mr. Dowsley 
has been ill quite a time now. 

G. F. Irons, a director of the Jas. 
Walker Hardware Co., Ltd., who has 
charge of the outside or contractors' 
supplies, is enjoying a week's holidays ; 
and Ed. Douglas, assistant manager of 
the firm, is away on a three weeks' fish- 
ing trip. 

Western Provinces. 

D. Small has opened a new hardware 
store at Irrwerial, Sask. 

The Continental Oil Co., is building 
a warehouse at Saskatoon. 

G. L. Ohalloner, Grandview, Man., 
has sold his hardware business to H. 
J. McLean. 

45 



The Aylward-Williams Hardware Co., 
Calgary, have started a furniture de- 
partment. 

D. J. Wallace, Winnipeg, has sold his 
hardware and plumbing business to the 
Whiting Hardware Co. 

Geo. Houston has opened a new tin- 
shop at Transcona, Man. He has had 
practical experience for many years. 

R. Swift Hudson, of Wood-Vallance 
Ltd., has returned from a three-months' 
trip to the old country. He will reside 
in future at Lethbridge. 

Pikrul Bros, are starting in the 
hardware business at Earl Grey, Sask. 

W. F. Wisper has sold his hardware 
business at Swalwell, Alta. 

Charles Dickens, Calgary, an expert 
optician, is working in Cochrane, Alta. 
An advertisement announces : "Ap- 
pointments for testing the eyesight can 
be made with Alvin at the hardware 
store." 

Hoshal, Carmichael & Co., Weyburn, 
Sask., have added a tinsmithing depart- 
ment to their hardware business. Mr. 
Sutcliffe has been secured to take charge. 
The new shop will be fully equipped and 
open for business by August 1., 

On Thursday morning last, just before 
twelve o'clock a fire started in J. B. 
Wilson's store, at Rouleau, Sask. One 
of the clerks was down in the cellar fix- 
ing the coal oil storage tank and had 
taken the cover oil and held a lantern 
over the edge to look into it. It imme- 
diately took fire, burning the clerk sev- 
erely about the hands and face. He had 
the presence of mind to clap the coyer 
on which started to smother the flames. 
By the time the brigade arrived all dan- 
ger was past. 

Maritime Provinces. 

It is reported that T. S. Simms & 
Co., broom and brush manufacturers, 
St. John, N.B., may remove to Freder- 
icton. 



CREDIT MEN MET. 

A meeting was held on Wednesday 
in Toronto to consider the advisability 
of forming a separate credit men's as- 
sociation. Representatives were present 
from practically all the large houses in 
that city. A committee consisting of 
H. D. Eby and five others was formed, 
which will look into the charter under 
which the Winnipeg association is ope- 
rated, and thoroughly consider just; what 
would be the best for the business men 
of Toronto. 



INSULATION STRIPPER. 

One of the latest devices on the mar- 
ket is a new pocket tool which cleans 
insulation from electric wires. It is 
worked by drawing the tool along the 
wire and it will separate without in- 
jury wires which have become twisted 
together. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CANADIAN METAL MARKETS 

See Itemized Market Quotation on Page 54. 



MARKETS IN BRIEF. 
Montreal. 
Turpentine.— Down 2 cents. 
Lead.— Up 10 cents. 
Toronto. 
Lead— Advanced 10 cents. 
Spelter— Advanced 25 cents. 
Turpentine— Reduced 3 cents. 
Linseed Oil— Reduced 3 cents 



MONTREAL. 

Montreal, July 28.-The metal markets 
are still active. There is no particular 
rush but there is a steady flow of .busi- 
ness that is reported as being quite sat- 
isfactory. Summer time is not regard- 
ed as a particularly husy season, hut on 
the whole trade during the past months 
has been, as far as Canada is 
concerned, quite favorable, and the out- 
look for the fall is practically all that 
could be desired. The only price change 
to report this week is an advance of ten 
cents in lead. This metal has been firm 
for some time now, the strength in the 
English markets being reflected here. 
About the only cause for the advance 
here is the strength in the Old Country. 
Spelter is also firm although prices have 
been unaffected here. Copper is steady, 
tin has been about holding its own. 

Tin.— The market has been irregular of 
late with future prices up and spots 
down, presumably, it is said, to dispose 
of spot or nearby tin. A recent Eng- 
lish reference to the market says in 
part : "There has been a little buying 
of three months' tin, generally attribut- 
ed to the operations of Dutch dealers, 
who, having sold Banka ex September 
sale, have been seeking to cover them- 
selves on the London market. These 
operations are mostly interpreted in con- 
nection with the market gossip that a 
further squeeze is to be engineered dur- 
ing September, by which time it is ex- 
pected that consumers will be forced in- 
to the market on a more liberal scale 
than has been witnessed for some time." 
Locally there is nothing of particular in- 
terest to report in regard to tin. 

Copper.— The market is steady with no 
unusual features. Reports have been 
received of the possible increase in pro- 
duction in the near future, but nothing 
authentic is yet mentioned in this re- 
spect The situation remains about the 
same with a good demand. 

Pig Iron.— There is still but little 
change in the iron market. The Cana^ 
dian situation is favorable on the whole 
and of the same character as has been 
previously mentioned. The English mar- 



kets show no change. In the United 
States activity is said to have been less 
general. Prices on, dock Montreal are:— 
No. 1 Summerlee, $20.00 ; Select Sum- 
merlee, $19.50 ; Soft Summerlee, $19.00; 
No. 3 Cleveland and Clarence, $15.50 to 
$17.00. 

Lead. — The market continues to show 
the firmness that has been apparent for 
some time. Prices are higher in the Old 
Country and the local price has been ad- 
vanced ten cents. It is difficult to as- 
cribe any reason for this movement oth- 
er than an increased demand showing 
more activity. The lead market is by 
no means the easiest to follow. A re- 
cent English report says : "The market 
for lead continues firm with no apparent 
increase in the supplies. It is reported 
that stocks are decreasing in all direc- 
tions, while American trade is rather 
better." It is pointed out that the re- 
cent Mexican troubles have restricted 
supplies coming from that country. De- 
mand for lead is steady with the firm- 
ness of the market. 

Spelter.— The spelter market is also 
quite firm with the demand sustained. 
There is nothing particular to report, the 
same steadiness being apparent that was 
referred to a week ago. 

Scrap Material.— Prices are still quot- 
ed as follows : — Heavy copper and wire, 
lie. ; heavy red brass, 10c. ; heavy lead, 
2?c. ; light copper and bottoms, 9c. ; tea 
lead, 2 He. ; machinery cast iron, No. 1, 
$14.50 ; No. 1 wrought iron, $12.50; mal- 
leable, No. 1, $9 ; miscellaneous steel, 
$5 ; stove plate, $12.50. 

TORONTO. 

Toronto, July 27.— Trade is improving 
slowly. That sums up the metal situa- 
tion in Ontario at the present moment. 
The improvement is coming gradually 
and the demand, except in a few cases, 
has not increased to any appreciable ex- 
tent during the past week. Still condi- 
tions are perceptibly becoming better 
and the improvement now showing itself 
in the United States augurs well for the 
future on this side of the line. 

The feature of the market this week 
has been the advance in lead. Business 
in that metal is now very brisk. 

Tin. — The developments in the lead 
market have relegated tin to second 
place in point of interest. Tin does not 
present any features at the present mo- 
ment. It remains at the same high 
level. 48 cents beins; the prevailing 
rrice locally still. '"The syndicate has 
comnlete control and seems thoroughly 
capable of holding on for an indefinite 
period. A more active speculative mar- 
Vet is renorted abroad and nrivate 
cables indicate an imward tendency, 

46 



Antimony.— The situation is unchang- 
ed. Little interest is being manifested 
in antimony and the sales are reported 
to be small. Some business is being 
done in a jobbing way at slightly 
c'.oser prices. 

Plates and Sheets.— The situation is 
mi riving more rapidly perhaps than in 
oilier directions. Good-sized orders are 
being placed and tihe inquiries indicate 
that buyers are now coming into the 
market for big bulk. A brisk fall trade 
is assured. No changes in price have 
been made. 

Conper. — The improvement which took 
i)i ace about a week ago, and which is 
noted elsewhere in this issue, does not 
anpear to have been sustained. Reports 
t<)-r*av, in fact, show a slightly weaker 
tendency in price. It is impossible now 
to accurately gauge the real state of 
the market and predictions as to the 
future are rather a riskv proposition. 
"I have heard opinions on copper boldly 
expressed for the last three years," said 
a metal man to-day, "and as far as I 
ran learn, the question has not been set- 
tled yet as to whether or not copper is 
is in a satisfactory condition." Sales 
locally have been satisfactory and en- 
quiries point to a continuation of 
br'sk conditions. 

Pie: Iron.— There is a steady improve- 
— ««»«t not'<^e^ 'n +ihe demand and condi- 
tions generally can be considered highly 
•"*+.' s f actorw for tb ; s season of the year, 
"r-ces still rule as follows : Canadian 
Foundry No. 1. $19 and No. 2, 50 cents 
a ton less. Old Country iron is quoted 
at $19.50 tor Middlesboro No. 3, and 
$20.25 for Clarence No. 3 ; Summerlee 
No. 2 is $22, and Cleveland No. 1, 
$20.50. Jarrow and Glene;arnoek irons 
are at $20 and $22 respectively. 

Lead— Imported lead advanced 10 
cents this wee^ and the price now quot- 
ed is $3.85. The advance comes as a 
result of a corresponding increase in the 
United States, where the active demand 
has forced un the nrice. The local de- 
mand is exceptionally actwe and. as 
stocks are lieht. it is safe to state that 
•Y-i pji-np! brislv condition will obtain for 
some time. 

Spelter.— The same conditi